Author:
Educurious .
Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson, Lesson Plan, Module, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
  • PBL
  • Vietnamese-American
  • vietnamese-american
  • wa-social-studies
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

    Education Standards

    Ké Chuyên: Vietnamese American Experiences

    Ké Chuyên: Vietnamese American Experiences

    Overview

    Students begin this unit by exploring the themes of humanity and community as they discuss  the many factors that influence the development of personal identities. They unpack together how we show versus hide different parts of ourselves, and how our identities can be both fixed and ever-changing. Then, students listen to oral histories by Vietnamese Americans to learn how displacement and resettlement have impacted them personally and shaped their outlook on helping others. Using evidence from these firsthand accounts, students answer the question: What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity? Throughout this unit, students work in teams to create a podcast where they reflect on their collective responsibility to stand in solidarity with displaced people.

    Educator Welcome

    Dear Educator,

    We understand the joy every teacher experiences when they discover what lights up a student, and how that breakthrough can make way for a powerful shift in student learning. We’re thrilled to partner with you in bringing project-based learning (PBL) to your classroom, and we think you’ll love these lessons, which were created in collaboration with educators, learning scientists, and experts in the field.   

    Whether this is your first voyage into PBL or you’re a seasoned pro, we’re sure you’ll agree that this approach sparks interest, ignites possibility, fuels a love for learning in students, and brings wonder to the classroom.

    We believe Open Educational Resources (OER) promote equitable access to standards-aligned, high-quality instructional materials for all educators to adapt and use. Contact us at info@educurious.org to learn more about how Educurious can support district or school adoption of this curriculum and the development of PBL teaching practices. Explore Educurious.org to discover other PBL courses and order printed materials.

    As you join your students on this learning journey, we’d love to hear from you. We want to experience your students’ curiosity, celebrate their projects, and hear about your successes, as well as what we can do better. Click here to share your thoughts. Thank you for taking us along on your adventure. 

    Onward!

    Your friends at Educurious

    Acknowledgements

    Unit Credits & Acknowledgments

    Educurious would like to express sincere gratitude to our partners and friends in the TPS Teachers Network and the Teaching with Primary Sources team at the Library of Congress for their guidance and support.

    This resource was made possible with generous funding from the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Western Region at Metro State University.

    The Educurious Team:

     

    Unit Development Team:

    • Writer: Valeria Gamarra
    • Educurious Reviewers: Chris Carter, Sara Nachtigal
    • External Reviewers: Diem Nguyen, Natasha Warsaw, Rosanne Golding, Laura-Louis Jacques, Jane Lo, Shanee Washington, and Maribel Santiago
    • Editor: Kristina Hawley

    Production Team:

    • Erik Robinson, Alex Goodell

    Project Manager:

    • Josie Brogan

    Educurious Leadership:

    • Jane Chadsey, CEO

    Unit Poster Image Credits:

    License & Attribution

    copyright

    Except where otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences by Educurious is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. You are free to share this material (by copying and redistributing it in any medium or format) and adapt it (by remixing, transforming, or building upon it). However, you must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate whether changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your adaptation. You may not use this material, or any adaptation of it, for commercial purposes. Please take care that adaptations do not introduce cultural bias.

    All logos and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All art, illustrations, and photos in this work are used with permission and are not included in the open license. This resource contains links to websites operated by third parties. These links are provided for your convenience only, and do not constitute or imply any endorsement or monitoring by Educurious. Please confirm the license status of any third-party resources and ensure that you understand their terms before use.

    If you adapt this work, please note the substantive changes, retitle the work, and provide the following attribution: “This resource was adapted from Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences, which was produced and published by Educurious and is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Module 1: People in Vietnam

    Module Overviewicon

    Module 1: People in Vietnam

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

     

    Unit Driving Question

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity

    Module Driving Question

    Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?

     

    Module 1 Overview

    Module Overview

    The phrase Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI, was popularized in the 1980s during a time of increased movement of people from Asia to the United States. The histories and cultures of the groups that make up the AAPI community are incredibly diverse. In this unit, we explore the history, culture, and forced movement (displacement) of Vietnamese people, particularly to the U.S., after the fall of Saigon. Through the stories of Vietnamese Americans, we learn about the power of community, resilience, and humanity as we seek to understand what it means to stand in solidarity with displaced people.

    In this module, students work to answer the question: Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s? In Lesson 1, students create an identity map to help them understand the complexity of identity, then listen to Nicki Tung’s interview to learn about her experience and perspective on standing in solidarity. In Lesson 2, students explore the complexity and history of the term AAPI, and hear a variety of people share how they self-identify and why. In Lesson 3, students learn about Vietnam before the fall of Saigon in order to understand more about its diverse people, culture, and heritage. Finally, in Lesson 4, students hear from refugees about their journeys out of Vietnam, and build historical context around the events that led to the refugee crisis there. As students listen to Vietnamese American oral histories, they gather evidence of the themes of this unit—including community, resilience, and humanity—in preparation for their podcast.  

    Lesson 1.1: Seeing Ourselves and Others (55 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2.Civ.1.6-8

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Create an identity map that includes components of identity that are fixed and changing, and that are visible and private.
    Use evidence from Nicki Tung’s interview, or another historical moment, to explain why solidarity is important.
    During this launch lesson, students explore the themes in this unit by discussing the many factors that influence the development of their personal identity. Then, students listen to Nicki Tung’s story to learn about how her experience as a refugee impacted her identity. Finally, students unpack the term solidarity and discuss the responsibility they have as humans to stand in solidarity with people facing displacement.
    Lesson 1.2: What’s in a Name? (80 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2. His.4.6-8

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Identify factors that influence the way people choose to identify.
    Analyze the political purpose, use, and impact of the term AAPI.
    In this lesson, students begin with an active-listening activity about their own name, and then connect that discussion to the larger responsibility of identifying people using the terms they choose for themselves. Students learn about some of the factors that led to the grouping of so many diverse communities into one: Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI. Finally, students hear a variety of people share how they identify and why.
    Lesson 1.3: Vietnam Before the Fall of Saigon (80 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2.Geo.4.6-8

    D2.His.1.6-8

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Explain the impact of perspective and bias on the creation of a primary source.
    Analyze primary sources for evidence of Vietnamese culture.
    In this lesson, students begin to learn about the rich history and culture of Vietnam, as it was before a large portion of its population was displaced in the 1970s. Students analyze primary source images for key facts and details about Vietnamese history and culture. Then, drawing on this historical context, students watch news coverage from April 30, 1975, of the fall of Saigon to begin to understand the significance of this event for Vietnamese people, both then and now.
    Lesson 1.4: Fleeing War, Looking for Refuge (80 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2. His.1.6-8

    D2. Civ.3.6-8

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Identify some of the factors that impact the refugee experience.
    Analyze primary and secondary sources for key facts and details about the U.S.–Vietnam War, the fall of Saigon, and the ensuing refugee crisis.
    In this lesson, students watch a video about what it means to be a refugee, and discuss the factors that impact how refugees around the world experience displacement. Then, students explore sources and listen to firsthand accounts that provide insight into how Vietnamese refugees experienced the U.S. in the 1970s, before building some background knowledge of the events that led to a mass displacement of Vietnamese people.
    Module Assessments
    • Lesson 1.1: Identity Map
    • Lesson 1.2: My Name, AAPI Video Notes Organizer, Know & Need to Know Chart
    • Lesson 1.3: Culture Conversations, Source Exploration, Key Terms Freewrite
    • Lesson 1.4: Source Exploration, Jigsaw, Module 1 Writing Response
    Vocabulary
    • AAPI: Asian American and Pacific Islander; this term arose in the 1980s to create political solidarity among these different ethnic groups in the U.S.
    • asylum: a form of protection which allows an individual to legally remain in a new country instead of being deported to their home country, where they would face persecution or harm
    • culture: a pattern of behaviors, values, and beliefs shared by a group of people or society
    • displacement: the forced relocation of someone from their home to another place, typically because of war, persecution, or natural disaster
    • humanity: the capacity for being kind and well-meaning to other people 
    • refugee: a person who is unwilling or unable to return to their country because of war, persecution, or natural disaster
    • resilience: a combination of strength, adaptability, and persistence that helps someone recover from challenges
    • solidarity: an expression of support for a person, people, or group

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.1: Seeing Ourselves and Others

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 1.1: Seeing Ourselves and Others

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Determine the factors that influenced the identity of Vietnamese American refugee Nicki Tung.
    • Define solidarity and discuss our collective responsibility to stand in solidarity with people around the world.

    Purpose

    During this launch lesson, you will explore the themes in this unit by discussing the many factors that influence the development of your personal identity. Then, you will listen to Nicki Tung’s story to learn about how her experience as a refugee impacted her identity. Finally, you will unpack the term solidarity and discuss the responsibility we have as humans to stand in solidarity with people facing displacement. 

    Lesson Steps

    1. Reflect on your personal identity: Use the Identity Map handout to explore the different layers of your identity and discuss the factors that impact changes to your identity. 
    2. Listen to Nicki Tung’s story: Listen to “Oral History with Nicki Tung" to learn about her experience as a Vietnamese refugee, how it impacts her identity, and how she helps others.
    3. Unpack solidarity: Explore the ways in which you have shown solidarity in your life, and discuss the responsibility human beings have to show solidarity with people around the world.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:55 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D2.Civ.1.6-8: Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental contexts.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • Highlighters (2 colors per student)
    Lesson Overview
    During this launch lesson, students explore the themes in this unit by discussing the many factors that influence the development of their personal identity. Then, students listen to Nicki Tung’s story to learn about how her experience as a refugee impacted her identity. Finally, students unpack the term solidarity and discuss the responsibility they have as humans to stand in solidarity with people facing displacement.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Preview & practice the pronunciation of kể chuyện. Use the guidance in Step 1 to practice the pronunciation on your own before practicing it with students.
    • Step 1: Create your personal identity map. Use the guidance about identity maps to create your own. Share this with your class as an example, and a way to model for your students that it is safe to share aspects of their personal identity with others in their classroom.
    • Step 2: Print transcripts for students who need them. Download and print copies of Nicki Tung’s story (transcript) as a general support for comprehension and listening, or for specific students to use.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Reflect on your personal identity(15 min)

    Purpose: Students ground themselves in the complexity of their own identities before they begin to explore the identities of the people they will hear from in this unit. The goal is for students to understand that there are many layers to a person’s identity, and that some aspects of identity are fixed while others change over time, based on internal and external factors. This personal reflection will prepare students to learn about the identities of others—particularly the complexity of Vietnamese American identities, as highlighted in this lesson and throughout this unit.

    [Slide 2] Share the unit title’s pronunciation. Display the unit title and practice the pronunciation as a class.

    You might say: Today we are starting our new unit: Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences. Before we get started, let’s make sure we understand how to pronounce the unit title so that we are respectful of the community we are going to learn from.

    • Slide 2. Help students break down the word using the guidance below:
      • Listen to the pronunciation as a class.
      • kể – /k/-ey (sounds like hey)
      • chuyện – ch-oo-yen
      • Inform students that kể chuyện (k-ey ch-oo-yen) means storytelling in Vietnamese.

    You might say: Personal and collective identities are complex, intersectional, rich, and dynamic. Before we learn about Vietnamese American identities, let’s look at the various factors that help inform how we see ourselves and others. To do this, we will create identity maps. The idea is to list as many parts of ourselves as possible! For example, some parts of my identity are that I’m (insert aspects of your own identity, like your age, race, number of siblings, place of origin, languages spoken, and as many others as you can think of).

    [Slides 3–4] Support students in creating their identity maps.

    • Slide 3. Share the identity map you created to introduce your students to this activity.
    • Slide 4. Distribute the Identity Map handout and review the directions with students.
      • For Step 1, if students are stuck, ask them to consider how people see them; how they see themselves; what they like and dislike; how many siblings they have; what kinds of clothing, music, food, etc. they like; where their family is from; etc.
      • For Step 2, consider providing examples. If this is a part of your identity that is fixed, or permanent, draw a straight line. For example, race is fixed at birth. If this is a part of your identity that can change, draw a squiggly line. For example, one’s age changes every year; one might also change one’s hair color or favorite hobby.

    [Slides 5–7] Facilitate a discussion on what influences personal identity.

    • Slide 5. Ask: What parts of our identity change, and what parts stay the same?
      • Possible response: Answers will vary, but students will likely notice that a large part of their identity is fluid or changing over time.
    • Slide 6. Ask: Why do some parts of our identity change, while others stay the same?
      • Possible response: Many of the fixed parts of our identity are influenced by DNA/genetics, while others are influenced by the deep-seated beliefs of our families. However, the fluid parts of our identities can be influenced by major life changes, such as getting older, moving to other places, experiencing trauma, changing schools, etc. This shows us that our identities can change due to, and are impacted by, outside factors in our lives. This is why our identities in 10 years will be similar to our current selves in some ways and different in others, because we will go on to have more life experiences that will impact those identities.
    • Slide 7. Ask: Why do you think that some parts of our identities are easier for people to recognize, while other parts are more hidden, or maybe even private?
      • Possible response: Answers will vary. People are complex, and some parts of identity are what we consider the ‘tip of the iceberg’—they are visible to many people, but only represent a small fraction of who the person is as a whole.
    Step 2: Listen to Nicki Tung’s story(20 min)

    Purpose: Students connect their understanding of the complexities of identity to Tung’s personal story, which includes much more than being a refugee. This will serve as a foundation for how we discuss the firsthand accounts, stories, and people throughout the unit.

    You might say: As we just discussed, identity is a complex idea. Everyone has parts of their identity that are clearly visible to others, and other parts that are not. We are now going to listen to the story of a person whose life completely changed after she was displaced from her home in Vietnam, and how that change impacted her identity.

    [Slide 8] Define the term refugee.

      • refugee: a person who is unwilling or unable to return to their country because of war, persecution, or natural disaster

    [Slide 9] Play “Oral History with Nicki Tung in its entirety [9:58].

      • Share the link to the transcript with students and/or distribute printed copies.
    • Invite students to follow along with the transcript and underline (or write down) evidence of, or insights about, Tung’s identity.
    • After listening, ask students to complete an identity map for Tung on their student handout.

    [Slide 10] Facilitate a discussion about the oral history. Discuss the parts of Tung’s identity that we see through her story, and the potential parts that we might not see.

    • Invite students to reflect on the discussion questions independently first.
      • What do we know about Tung’s identity? What other parts of her identity might be less visible?
      • What did we learn from Tung about her refugee experience? What can her story teach us about people experiencing displacement, in general?
    • Then, organize students into small groups to discuss their responses.
    • Finally, invite students to share their thoughts whole-class.
      • What do we know about Tung’s identity? What other parts of her identity might be less visible?
        • Possible response: We know that Tung identifies as Chinese and was living in Vietnam. Her family fled Vietnam at a time when many other Vietnamese people were also fleeing Vietnam. Those who fled Vietnam by boat came to be called “the boat people.” Tung is a scuba diver who likes to volunteer and give back to her community. She feels that people see very little of that—that they see her as Asian, but don’t recognize these other parts of her identity. And we know that there are many parts of her identity that we didn’t hear about: her other interests, family, friends, etc.
      • What did we learn from Tung about her refugee experience? What can her story teach us about people experiencing displacement, in general?
        • Possible response: Answers will vary, but students should land on the understanding that many people who had the opportunity to help Tung, and the others who fled with her, chose not to. Also, even after she reached safety, she faced hardship and a lack of acceptance (i.e., people telling her that refugees were “taking away jobs”). In the end, it wasn’t just fleeing her home that was hard; it was also navigating her new life afterward. This can teach us to have more empathy for people who are forced to become refugees, so they feel more welcome than Tung did when she was younger.
    Step 3: Unpack solidarity(20 min)

    Purpose: Students connect Tung’s story of how she was treated as a refugee to their own understanding of what it means to truly stand in solidarity with displaced people. Students define solidarity by reflecting on their own actions toward others throughout their lives, and by discussing the extent to which we have a responsibility to help others when we can.

    You might say: Nicki Tung’s story made us reflect on how refugees are treated, and what people can do to welcome and support refugees. In some ways, she made us reflect on solidarity, too. We are going to build on our understanding of what that means now.

    [Slide 11] Define solidarity.

    • solidarity: an expression of support for a person, people, or group
    • Provide an example, such as a protest with a group of citizens marching, holding signs, and chanting slogans. They are in solidarity with each other, or united behind a common goal or purpose.
    • The word solidarity is most often used to describe a sense of unity with a political group, striking workers, or people who have been deprived of their rights in some way.

    You might say: People stood in solidarity with Nicki Tung and other Vietnamese refugees. These experiences and stories can help us learn about the power of community, resilience, and humanity, and our collective responsibility to stand with people experiencing displacement around the world. There are many ways to stand in solidarity with a person or group of people.  

    [Slide 12] Facilitate student reflection on the term solidarity.

    • Invite students to reflect on a moment when they felt connected to someone or something. Ask:
      • Who or what did you feel connected with? What was going on in your life? Who helped you feel like you belonged, and what did that belonging feel like?
    • Invite students to think of a time when they helped another person feel like they belonged. Ask:
        • What made you step up to help bring that person into the community you were in? How did you feel afterward, and how do you think the other person felt?
    • Invite students to share their responses with a classmate.

    You might say: If you have ever helped someone become a part of a community you were in, you were standing in solidarity with them, doing what you could in that moment to help. There are many ways to stand in solidarity with a person or group of people.

    [Slide 13] Introduce the unit poster.

    • Again, invite students to practice the pronunciation of kể chuyện (k-ey ch-oo-yen).
      • kể – /k/-ey (sounds like hey)
      • chuyện – ch-oo-yen
    • Remind students that kể chuyện means storytelling in Vietnamese.
    • Review the unit driving question, module driving questions, and final product.
      • Unit: What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?
      • Module 1: Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?
      • Module 2: What can we learn from refugees, past and present, about their experiences of resettling in the United States?
      • Module 3: How can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?
      • Final product: In teams, students create a podcast that explores our collective responsibility to stand in solidarity with people facing displacement and resettlement.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.2: What’s in a Name?

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 1.2: What’s in a Name?

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Examine the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) identity and the factors that influence the way people choose to identify.
    • Analyze the political purpose, use, and impact of the term AAPI.

    Purpose

    You will begin this lesson with an active-listening activity about your own name, and we will connect that discussion to the larger responsibility of identifying people using the terms they choose for themselves. Then, you will learn about some of the factors that led to the grouping of so many diverse communities into one: Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI. Finally, you will hear a variety of people share how they identify and why.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Reflect on the power of names: Use the My Name handout to reflect on the importance of your name to your identity through an active-listening activity.
    2. Learn about the history of the term AAPI: Build a geographic understanding of where the groups of people we are learning about originated and the political circumstances in the U.S. that grouped them together, with a focus on Vietnam.
    3. Explore the terms people use to identify themselves, including AAPI: Watch “Are You ‘AAPI’ or ‘Asian American’? It's Complicated and examine the factors that influence opinions about the use of AAPI in the AAPI Video Notes Organizer.
    4. Preview your final product: Watch the first part of the video “Meet the VBP Team” and review the unit poster to orient to the final product, which is a podcast. Then, organize into podcast teams and create a Know & Need to Know chart that will help you create a successful podcast by the end of this unit.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:80 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D2.His.4.6-8: Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students begin with an active-listening activity about their own name, and then connect that discussion to the larger responsibility of identifying people using the terms they choose for themselves. Students learn about some of the factors that led to the grouping of so many diverse communities into one: Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI. Finally, students hear a variety of people share how they identify and why.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Pair students into active-listening teams. Decide if you want to preselect partners for this activity, or if you want students to select their own partners.
    • Step 4: Set up teams. Students will organize into the podcast teams that they will work in throughout the unit. Decide how you want to group students into teams.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Reflect on the power of names(20 min)

    Purpose: Students continue to build on the themes of identity and individuality, which are important to remember when we talk about how people are grouped in society. Students should leave this step understanding that names have history and importance, so we have to make the effort to use the names for people and communities that they have chosen for themselves, out of respect.

    [Slide 2] OPTIONAL: Practice pronunciation. Display the unit title and work on pronunciation as a class.

    • Students practiced this pronunciation in Lesson 1.1. Consider encouraging additional practice as needed.
      • Listen to the pronunciation as a class.
      • Help students break down the word using the guidance below:
        • kể – /k/-ey (sounds like hey)
        • chuyện – ch-oo-yen
      • Inform students that kể chuyện (k-ey ch-oo-yen) means storytelling in Vietnamese.

    You might say: We practice the pronunciation to ensure that we are making a sustained effort to get it right. When people from other countries come to the U.S., they work hard to learn English and fit into a society that isn’t always welcoming. When we, as students, are invited to learn about a community that may be different than ours, we must make an effort to learn the pronunciation and meaning of words in their language. After all, names and their pronunciation matter. Now, we are going to start an activity that asks us to reflect on why names are so important.

    [Slide 3] Display the poem “Say My Name” by Meleika Gesa-Fatafehi.

    • Use the play button at the link to hear Pádraig Ó Tuama read the poem.
    • Ask: What is this poem saying about history, ancestors, names, and identity?
      • Possible response: The speaker is saying that their name belonged to them; it was given to them by a history that preceded their birth. They are implying that our names are a reflection of the lives our ancestors lived, making names important to both our individual identity and the collective identity of our people.

    [Slide 4] Distribute the My Name handout and review the directions and questions with students.

    • Provide students time to complete the My Name handout.

    Teacher Tip: Supporting Students Through Identity Work

    As you lead this activity, be mindful in how you handle this conversation with students who may have unique circumstances. You might have students who don’t know the history of their name due to adoption, or students who don’t identify with their birth name given their gender identity. In these moments, it’s important to leverage your relationship with students to help them feel safe. For a student whose name differs from their birth name, encourage them to reflect on their chosen name. If a student knows little about the origin of their name, encourage them to reflect on the last few questions, which focus on their nicknames, pronunciation of their name, and the importance of respecting people’s identity. Here are some other resources that might be helpful in making all students feel supported in your classroom.

     

    [Slide 5] Set norms for the active-listening activity. Talking points:

    • Work with a partner to reflect on your own names and the importance of referring to people using the names that they want us to use.
    • One person speaks. The other listens and asks clarifying questions, but does not share their own thoughts or opinions until it is their turn.
    • Partner A will have five minutes to respond to any of the discussion questions from their handout. If there is a lull in their response, partner B can ask one of the following questions.
            • When you said ____, what did you mean?
            • Can you elaborate on your statement about _______?
            • Can you give an example to support your statement about _______?
    • After five minutes, partner B will have five minutes to respond to any of the discussion questions. If there is a lull in their response, partner A can ask one of the above questions.
    • After both partners have spoken, each partner has three minutes to reflect on and discuss one statement their partner made that stuck with them during the activity.
    • I will keep time and let you know when it is time to switch.

    [Slide 6] Lead a reflection on the active-listening activity.

    • Students discuss the extent to which the activity helped them listen to understand, rather than listen to respond, and how they can use this protocol. Ask:
      • How did it feel to not respond in the moment to what your partner said?
      • How does this activity help strengthen our listening skills?
      • What can we take from this activity to use in other parts of our lives?

    You might say: Names have history and weight. Calling people what they want to be called is affirming; it’s a celebration of the history that led to that name. Not listening to people, and calling them what we want to call them—like a mispronounced version of their name, or a different name altogether—is disempowering. This applies not only to individuals like ourselves, but also to whole communities. We are about to learn more about the Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI, community. But is this the name we should be using? Is this how the groups within that community want to be named? Let’s find out.

    Step 2: Learn about the history of the term AAPI(25 min)

    Purpose: Students build context around the term AAPI, and the history that led to the grouping of so many people with such different backgrounds. Students should leave this step understanding why the term exists, as well as the political reasons that so many different communities have been grouped together under it. In this step, students also further geographically unpack Vietnam.

    [Slide 7] Review a small excerpt from Nicki Tung’s story, as read in Lesson 1.1.

    • “People get the same treatment no matter where they go. I mean, to this day, I went to Virginia with my boyfriend a couple of months ago and I still get the look because I'm Asian. So, just imagine 20 to 30 years ago, people have never seen Asian before and they don't know what to do with us. And they don't know how to react around us. It was very small, I remember I was going to elementary there was only two other Asians in the whole school, and then my sister and I. That’s it.” (Source: “Oral History with Nicki Tung)

    [Slide 8] Facilitate a discussion about identity, based on the excerpt from Tung’s story. Ask:

    • As we know, Tung is Vietnamese and ethnically Chinese. However, in this excerpt she refers to herself as “Asian.” Why do you think she uses this term to refer to herself in the U.S. instead of “Vietnamese”?
      • Possible response: She is using the term Asian because that is how she is seen by Americans, instead of as Vietnamese. She is grouped together with the rest of the people from Asia based only on perceived visual resemblance.
    • What is the impact of referring to someone like Tung as “Asian” instead of “Vietnamese”?
      • Possible response: Using the broader term “Asian,” instead of the more specific “Vietnamese,” dulls Tung’s identity. She is grouped with many other people from many other countries, and her identity is partially erased.

    You might say: We know a little about Nicki Tung after the previous lesson. We know she is more than simply “Asian,” or even “Vietnamese.” But what if we didn’t? Is it still okay to group people we don’t know into one big category, like “Asian American and Pacific Islander?” Maybe… but where did that grouping and name even come from? Let’s build some context.

    [Slides 9–14] Introduce background knowledge about the history of the term AAPI. Talking points:

    • Slide 9. Asia is the largest continent in the world, and is made up of 48 countries.
    • Slide 10. The first major wave of Asian migration into U.S. territory began in the mid-1800s, during the California Gold Rush. Immigrants from Asia faced discrimination from people in the U.S. who blamed them for their own economic issues. You can see this discrimination in a political cartoon from the 1800s titled “The Anti-Chinese Wall.” (Visit the digital catalog entry for “The Anti-Chinese Wall” to learn more about this and other related items at the Library of Congress).
    • Slide 11. This discrimination led to the passing of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. This act prohibited the migration of Chinese laborers, and heavily limited the immigration of Asian people to the U.S. until Congress passed the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. This act loosened restrictions against immigrants from Asia. This led to another major wave of migration from Asia into the United States.
    • Slide 12. Although more people from Asia were able to immigrate to the U.S., it led to increased discrimination of Asian Americans. According to the New York Times, the beating of Peter Yew by New York City police in 1975 sparked large protests. People gathered and protested to call for the cessation of police harassment against the Chinese community.  
    • Slide 13. The term Asian American arose out of this activism, as a way to signal to the U.S. that the Asian community would stand together to fight for rights and protection. It reflected that Asian people living in the U.S. were also Americans, and deserved the same rights as other Americans. In the 1980s, the term Asian American began to also include Pacific Islander people, like the native peoples of Hawaii and Polynesia, given their proximity to Asia and Asian heritage. It became Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI.
    • Slide 14. In 2021, there were nearly 22 million people in the U.S. who could trace their origins to Asia. It is expected that by 2060, that number will be closer to 46 million people. 85% of the AAPI population, as of 2021, could trace their origins to China, India, the Philippines, Vietnam, Korea, or Japan.  

    [Slide 15] Invite students to reflect on the history of the term AAPI for the many groups of people within this community. Ask:

    • What is the political purpose of using the term AAPI for a community made up of people from such different places and with such different histories?
      • Possible response: The term was created to unite different immigrant Asian communities so they would have more political power. People within these communities realized that by acting as one, in solidarity with one another, they could demand better protection of their rights.

    [Slide 16] Review the Module 1 driving question.

    • Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?

    You might say: In this module and unit, we are going to focus on the experiences of Vietnamese American refugees. This includes people like Nicki Tung. We are focusing on one group of people within the larger AAPI community because, as we discussed, it is impossible for one term to speak to the histories of all of these different cultures. By focusing on one country and its people, we are narrowing in and giving depth to our understanding of that community. To support this depth of learning, let’s orient ourselves to where Vietnam is located and learn some basic facts about the country.

    [Slides 17–20] Provide geographic context for Vietnam. Talking points:

    • Slide 17. As we mentioned earlier, the AAPI community is made up of many different groups of people. There are so many different cultures and histories within this continent, and each country is full of many different identities.
    • Slide 18. We find Vietnam near China, Cambodia, and Thailand, on the Indochinese Peninsula.
    • Slide 19. Here we see some of the natural attractions found in Vietnam today.
    • Slide 20. As Nicki Tung explained, Vietnam has gone through some really hard times in its history. Here we see Vietnamese refugees being pulled off of a boat in 1975. We will learn more about what caused this displacement and more about Vietnam in the next lesson.
    Step 3: Explore the terms people use to identify themselves, including AAPI(20 min)

    Purpose: Students hear from members of the AAPI community about how they feel about the use of the term. Students should walk away from this step with a better understanding of the complexities of using the term, given the complex identities of the people grouped under it.

    You might say: Now that we have some context about where the term AAPI comes from, we are going to hear from people within the AAPI community about how they feel about the term.

    [Slides 21–22] Play the PBS Voices video “Are You ‘AAPI’ or ‘Asian American’? It's Complicated” in its entirety [11:01]. Before you play the video, distribute the AAPI Video Notes Organizer and review the directions and guiding questions with students.

    • Stop the video at the timestamps shown below to give students an opportunity to respond to the guiding questions.
    • [0:45] What does AANHPI stand for?
    • [1:09] What geographic region unites the AANHPI community?
    • [3:30] Why was the term Asian American invented?
    • [7:00] How does the history of Spanish and U.S. colonization impact AANHPI people and how they self-identify?
    • When the video is complete, invite students to respond to the reflection questions independently or in teams.
      • What are some criticisms of the name AAPI?
        • Possible response: Answers will vary, but the overall criticism is that AAPI erases the individual identities of the many countries that are grouped under the term. Each country has its own culture, values, and history, and one term cannot encompass all of those differences.
      • How do people who don’t like the term AAPI want to be identified?
        • Possible response: Answers will vary, but people typically want to be identified by their country of origin, not an umbrella term. Whenever possible, we should ask how people want to be identified to make sure we are respectful.

    Teacher Tip: Extension Article Exploring AAPI Identity

    If you and your students would benefit from more work unpacking AAPI identity, consider inviting students to engage with the Vox article “The inadequacy of the term ‘Asian American.’” We offer up a mini-lesson below on what this might look like.

    • Read through the article and select one or more excerpt(s) that you want students to read. The excerpt(s) should provide multiple perspectives on the use of the term Asian American.
    • Have students annotate the excerpt(s) using a nonfiction annotation approach. For example:
    • Who is this section about?
    • What did you learn about the “who” in this section?
    • Summarize the central idea of the entire text/document concisely (using as few words as possible)
    • Reflect: According to the article, why do some people in the Asian American community push back against the term Asian American?
     
    Step 4: Preview your final product(15 min)

    Purpose: Students preview the unit’s final product, and create a class Know & Need to Know chart to reflect on what they know and what they want to learn.

    You might say: There are many ways to stand in solidarity with other people: by being welcoming to people who are new to your community; advocating for laws that help people who are facing hardships; and amplifying the stories of communities that don’t always get attention. In this unit, we will explore the many ways we can stand in solidarity with people inside and outside of our communities. One way we can take action in this unit is through our final project. We’ll look at that in a moment, but first, let’s look at the questions that will drive our unit and this module.

    [Slide 23] Preview the final product. Play the video “Meet the VBP team in its entirety [2:07], then ask:

    • Based on this video, what do you think your final project is going to be?
    • How do you think this final project will help us stand in solidarity with people around the world?

    [Slide 24] Organize students into their podcast teams.

    • Adapt this slide to communicate how students will organize into podcast teams.
      • You can assign teams or let students choose their own teams.
      • There should be 3–4 students per team.

    [Slide 25] Podcast teams create their Know & Need to Know chart.

    You might say: Now that you are in your podcast teams, it’s time to complete your first assignment together. As a team, you will work on a Know & Need to Know chart for this unit. You’ll consider the following questions: What do you know about Vietnamese culture and history, Vietnamese Americans, solidarity, and displaced people? What questions do you have about Vietnamese culture and history, Vietnamese Americans, solidarity, and displaced people? What do you know about creating a podcast? What questions do you have about creating a podcast?

    • Distribute the Know & Need to Know chart handout to students and review the directions.
      • Know: On this part of your chart, reflect on what you already know about Vietnamese people, solidarity, Asian Americans, podcasts, and the general purpose of the unit we have just started.
      • Need to Know: On this part of your group chart, reflect on what you still need to know about these big ideas.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.3: Vietnam Before the Fall of Saigon

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 1.3: Vietnam Before the Fall of Saigon 

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Reflect on how my identity is shaped by my culture.
    • Analyze primary source images for evidence of Vietnamese culture.
    • Identify implications of the event known as the fall of Saigon.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will begin to learn about the rich history and culture of Vietnam, as it was before a large portion of its population was displaced in the 1970s. You’ll analyze primary source images for key facts and details about Vietnamese history and culture. Drawing on this historical context, you will watch news coverage from April 30, 1975, of the fall of Saigon. This will help you understand the significance of this event for Vietnamese people, both then and now.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Reflect on cultural elements that shape your identity: Using the Culture Conversations handout, define culture and reflect on cultural elements in your own life.
    2. Learn some of the history of Vietnam: Your teacher will present key facts and details to prepare you for a primary source analysis of Vietnam’s cultural history.
    3. Analyze primary sources for evidence of Vietnamese culture: Using the Source Exploration handout, build your understanding of Vietnamese culture. Then, reflect on how perspective and bias can impact people’s interpretations and understanding of unfamiliar cultures.
    4. Introduce the fall of Saigon: Define displacement, asylum, resilience, and humanity using your Key Terms Freewrite handout. Watch the South China Morning Post video “The ‘fall of Saigon’ in 1975, how the news reported it” and use these terms to begin to discuss the implications of this historic event.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:80 minutes
    Standards
    • C3

    D2.Geo.4.6-8: Explain how cultural patterns and economic decisions influence environments and the daily lives of people in both nearby and distant places. 

    D2.His.1.6-8: Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.

    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • Chart paper & markers
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students begin to learn about the rich history and culture of Vietnam, as it was before a large portion of its population was displaced in the 1970s. Students analyze primary source images for key facts and details about Vietnamese history and culture. Then, drawing on this historical context, students watch news coverage from April 30, 1975, of the fall of Saigon to begin to understand the significance of this event for Vietnamese people, both then and now.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 3: Plan for individual and collaborative work. Decide whether you want students to complete their own Source Exploration or collaborate in partner teams to do so.
    • Step 3: Preview additional sources about Vietnamese culture. If time permits and/or your students are interested, consider having students continue their investigation into Vietnamese history and culture using two resources from the Library of Congress, the Annamite Bibliography and the Mechanics and Crafts of the People of Annam.
    • Step 4: Decide on the structure for class definitions. Choose a thought-catcher tool, like Google Docs or Jamboard, for class discussions. It can be a digital tool, or you can build anchor charts (as suggested in the Step 4 Teacher Tip). Either way, you’ll want to ensure you can reference it throughout the unit as students build a deeper understanding of the key terms initially discussed in this lesson.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Reflect on cultural elements that shape your identity(15 min)

    Purpose: Students reflect on cultural elements in their own lives and discuss the many different cultures that exist within their classroom community and around the world. Students should walk away from this step understanding that there are many different cultures around them that deserve to be celebrated, and how to use a Culture Wheel to identify the cultural elements within a specific society.

    [Slide 2] Distribute and complete the Culture Conversations handout.  

    You might say: These questions help us start to define the culture of our own community. Our responses might be similar to the responses of other people in the room, but they might also be different. That’s because our culture is defined by our personal histories, our parents and/or guardians, our family’s place of origin, and the histories of the places in which we live.

    [Slide 3] Define culture. Unpack elements that help us understand the culture of a specific place or community using the Culture Wheel.

    • culture: a pattern of behaviors, values, and beliefs shared by a group of people or society
    • Unpack the Culture Wheel. Explain that when we are seeking to understand the culture of a group of people or society, it is helpful to explore the various elements.

    [Slide 4] Facilitate a whole-class discussion on cultural elements. Invite students to reflect on the importance of understanding other cultures by discussing the questions below.

    • Ask: How can identifying the different elements in the Culture Wheel for a specific group of people or society help us understand that group better?
      • Possible response: The Culture Wheel allows us to look at different elements within the culture of a group of people more specifically, which allows us to get a better picture of their culture as a whole.
    • Ask: Why is it important to learn about different cultures within our own community and around the world?
      • Possible response: In learning about the lived experiences and values of people who are different from us, we can also learn to appreciate and celebrate those differences.
    Step 2: Learn some of the history of Vietnam(10 min)

    Purpose: Students build a basic understanding of Vietnam’s history before they begin their research into Vietnamese culture in the next step.

    You might say: Culture is all around us, and we should celebrate the different cultures that exist in our communities and around the world. Today we will be looking at some aspects of Vietnamese culture that can be traced back thousands of years.

    [Slides 5–14] Provide some historical context for Vietnam. Provide students with a brief history of Vietnam in preparation for their team research activity in Step 3. (Sources of facts and details: Asia for Educators, National Geographic, BBC.)

    • Slide 5. Civilizations in the territory known today as Vietnam can be traced back 5,000 years.
    • Slide 6. Independent tribes inhabited the territory until it was taken over by the Chinese in 207 BCE. This is when the territory was given the name Nam Việt. Nam Việt became part of the Chinese empire. In the year 939 CE, forces led by Ngô Quyền overtook the Chinese forces and pushed them out of the territory. From then on, the territory was ruled by a series of dynasties, and it was renamed Đại Việt.
    • Slide 7. From 1010–1025, the territory experienced its first “golden age,” or time of prosperity, with the Lý dynasty. During this time, the first university was established, and a written language of characters known as Chữ Nôm were created. Two rival dynasties developed by the mid-1500s—one in the North (the Trịnh) and the other in the South (the Nguyễn).
    • Slide 8. It was the Nguyễn dynasty that renamed the territory Vietnam.
    • Slide 9. However, by the end of the 19th century, the French had seized control of Vietnam and declared it a French colony. The French divided the territory into three separate states.
    • Slide 10. In 1930, a colonial opposition leader named Hồ Chí Minh attempted to unite the three states into one through the creation of the Indochinese Communist Party.
    • Slide 11. In 1940, during World War II, the territory was invaded by Japan, which held control until its defeat in 1945. During Japan’s occupation, Hồ Chí Minh and other Vietnamese people formed a guerilla organization called the Việt Minh to resist occupation in Vietnam.
    • Slide 12. After the war, Hồ Chí Minh and the Indochinese Communist Party declared Vietnam independent. They set up a government in the North. The French returned at the same time and sought to rule the territory once again, as they had before the Japanese invasion.
    • Slide 13. At this time (1945), the U.S. and other European allies expressed support for the French in their efforts to eliminate communism in the region. The French forces continued to clash with the Northern Vietnamese forces, and in 1954, Vietnam was officially divided into North Vietnam and South Vietnam.
    • Slide 14. In 1965, the U.S. took over France’s efforts to fight communism in South Vietnam. This marked the beginning of the U.S.–Vietnam War.
    Step 3: Analyze primary sources for evidence of Vietnamese culture (40 min)

    Purpose: Students unpack primary sources that further inform their understanding of Vietnamese culture. They look at several different images and connect their analysis of each image to their prior knowledge of Vietnamese culture and history.

    You might say: In order to build our understanding of Vietnamese culture, we are going to participate in a source exploration.

    [Slide 15] Prepare students to analyze primary sources.

    • Distribute the Source Exploration handout, then review the directions, sources, and questions with students.

    [Slide 16] Facilitate a share-out on Question 3.

    • Invite students to discuss their responses to the third question.

    You might say: One thing we didn’t discuss through these sources is the question of who took these photographs. These photographs were taken by the U.S. military and the French, and represent a Western point of view rather than a Vietnamese point of view. Given this, there may have been details excluded from the frame because of what the photographer valued or personally wanted to see.

    [Slide 17] Facilitate a discussion on perspective and bias. Ask:

    • How might the photographer’s perspective and bias limit what we can see about Vietnamese culture through these photographs?
      • Possible response: Responses will vary; encourage students to think about which parts of Vietnamese society the French colonists would want to take pictures of. Would they be inclined to take pictures of the everyday, working-class parts of Vietnamese society? Or would they prioritize the parts of society that paint Vietnam in a specific way—one that benefits the French? Just like we reflect on what we see, we should also reflect on what we don’t see.

    Teacher Tip: Annotating Images With the Quadrant Strategy

    When looking at primary source images, pairing them with an annotation strategy helps students pull more information from each image. Otherwise, for more complex images (like a political cartoon with lots of symbols), it can be hard for students to digest all of the information at once. Here is one annotation strategy you can use; it works best when students have a physical copy of the source material. You can use the following talking points with your students.

    • Step 1: Summarize any text features.
      • Image title
      • Image caption
      • Image source
    • Step 2: Draw a vertical line down the middle of the image. 
    • Step 3: Draw a horizontal line across the image, connecting with the vertical line and creating four quadrants.
    • Step 4: Number each quadrant #1–4 in clockwise order, starting with the top left quadrant.
    • Step 5: Work your way through each quadrant (starting with number 1) and list all of the things you see in the quadrant. Then, using your context of history at this time, explain what you think these elements represent. 
    • Step 6: After analyzing each quadrant individually, look at the whole image again. Answer the following questions: 
      • What message is the photographer/artist trying to send to their audience through this image?
      • How might this image impact the perspective of people viewing it?
    Step 4: Introduce the fall of Saigon(15 min)

    Purpose: Students engage with some of the key terms from the unit. Students pull from their own understanding before exploring a class definition for each of the terms. Then, they create inferences about why they are learning these terms for this unit, and how these ideas will come into play in the upcoming lessons. Finally, students watch a primary source video about the fall of Saigon to frame the focus of the rest of the unit.

    You might say: Now that we’ve learned more about Vietnamese history and culture, it’s time to begin our learning about the refugee crisis and large-scale displacement that occurred in Vietnam in the 1970s. This will be the focus of the remainder of our unit. In our next lesson, we will learn about the factors that created the refugee crisis in Vietnam. In order to help us more deeply understand these factors, we are going to learn several new vocabulary terms.

    [Slide 18] Distribute the Key Terms Freewrite handout and prompt students to freewrite on one or more of the questions as they are able, depending on their existing background knowledge of each of the terms: displacement, asylum, humanity, and resilience.

    • What do you think of when you hear the word resilience? What do you consider resilience to look like, sound like, and feel like?
    • What do you think it means to have and show humanity toward other people?
    • What does it mean for a person to seek asylum in another country?
    • Define displacement. What does it mean to be displaced?

    Invite students to share out their responses. Capture student responses on a class anchor chart, or in another place that students can easily reference in future lessons.

    Teacher Tip: Collaborative Anchor Charts & The Frayer ModelWhen introducing new academic language, one way to support student language acquisition and development is through the use of structured anchor charts. Using a classroom anchor chart, whether physical or digital, for each class allows you to build in natural reflection moments at the end of each module. Simply bring the anchor chart back out as you finish each module, and ask students to reflect on whether their collective understanding of the concept has changed, as well as if there is anything that should be added or amended. For those anchor charts, you might consider using the Frayer Model to further build out these vocabulary definitions. To see examples of the Frayer Model and learn more, consider reading The Frayer Model resource from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.

    [Slides 19–22] Provide definitions for key terms:

    • Slide 19. displacement: the forced relocation of someone from their home to another place, typically because of war, persecution, or natural disaster
    • Slide 20. resilience: a combination of strength, adaptability, and persistence that helps someone recover from challenges
    • Slide 21. humanity: the capacity for being kind and well-meaning to other people
    • Slide 22. asylum: a form of protection which allows an individual to legally remain in a new country instead of being deported to their home country, where they would face persecution or harm

    [Slide 23] Facilitate a share-out in which students use the academic terms to make connections to and inferences about refugee crises in Vietnam and other places.

    • Invite students to do a Think-Pair-Share on the questions below, then share out their ideas whole-class.
    • Which past or present world events could be described using these key terms?
      • Possible response: The U.S. troop withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2021 and the Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2022. In both of these events, refugees were displaced and had to seek asylum in other countries.
    • How do you think these key terms will come up when we are discussing Vietnamese refugees in this unit? Make an inference using at least two of the key terms we discussed.
      • Possible response: I believe that these terms will come up when we study Vietnamese refugees who sought asylum in the U.S., and that the Vietnamese refugees we are going to learn from demonstrated resilience after they were displaced.

    [Slide 24] Introduce students to the fall of Saigon.

    You might say: The fall of Saigon marked the beginning of a refugee crisis. Vietnamese refugees sought asylum in the U.S. and around the world as these events unfolded, and had no choice but to depend on the humanity of the new communities they joined. Today, people and places in various parts of the world are experiencing refugee crises. In the next lesson, we will listen to firsthand accounts from refugees to understand how refugee experiences are similar and different. We will then draw on these firsthand accounts in future lessons to help us develop content for our podcasts.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 1.4: Fleeing War, Looking for Refuge

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 1.4: Fleeing War, Looking for Refuge 

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Discuss some of the factors that impact the refugee experience.
    • Explore primary and secondary sources for key facts and details about the U.S.–Vietnam War, the fall of Saigon, and the ensuing refugee crisis.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will watch a video about what it means to be a refugee, and discuss some of the factors that impact how refugees around the world experience displacement. Then, you will explore sources and listen to firsthand accounts that provide insight into how Vietnamese refugees experienced the U.S. in the 1970s, before building some background knowledge of the events that led to a mass displacement of Vietnamese people.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Explore what it means to be a refugee: Watch the TED-Ed video “What does it mean to be a refugee?” and discuss the factors that impact the experiences of refugees.
    2. Learn about some of the causes and effects of the U.S.–Vietnam War: Look at a timeline of events that led up to the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War and use the Source Exploration handout to reflect on how people in the U.S. responded to their country’s involvement in the war.
    3. Listen to Vietnamese American refugee stories: Listen to a firsthand account of Vietnamese people becoming refugees, and use the Jigsaw handout to gather evidence of refugee resilience during their displacement.
    4. Respond to the Module 1 driving question: Using what you have learned about the displacement of Vietnamese people and the refugee experience, respond to the question in the Module 1 Writing Response handout.

    Explore More

     

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:80 minutes
    Standards
    • C3

    D2. His.1.6-8: Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts. 

    D2. Civ.3.6-8: Examine the origins, purposes, and impact of constitutions, laws, treaties, and international agreements.

    D2. Civ.1.6-8: Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental contexts.

    • CCSS

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7: Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students watch a video about what it means to be a refugee, and discuss the factors that impact how refugees around the world experience displacement. Then, students explore sources and listen to firsthand accounts that provide insight into how Vietnamese refugees experienced the U.S. in the 1970s, before building some background knowledge of the events that led to a mass displacement of Vietnamese people.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 2: Review “The Mỹ Lai Massacre” video. Determine if the contents of the video are appropriate for your classroom. If you do play the video, make sure to frame it for students accordingly. See the Teacher Tip resources for further framing support.
    • Step 3: Identify teams for the jigsaw activity. This activity is designed for groups of four, but you can distribute the sources differently if you want the students to work in smaller groups.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Explore what it means to be a refugee(15 min)

    Purpose: Students further explore the definition of refugee, this time as it is defined by the United Nations (UN), and discuss the factors that impact the refugee experience in the U.S. and around the world. Students should walk away from this step with a clearer understanding of the many obstacles that refugees face.

    You might say: In this unit so far, we have explored what it means to show humanity toward other people. We have discussed what it looks like and feels like to stand in solidarity with other people. As we continue to learn about the refugee experience from refugees, it’s important to have a clear understanding of what we mean when we say refugee community. We are going to explore the term, and the challenges that are shared and different across refugee experiences.

    [Slide 2] Play the video “What does it mean to be a refugee?” in its entirety [5:28]. Then ask:

    • According to the United Nations, what is the difference between a migrant and a refugee?
      • Possible response: According to the UN, a migrant is someone who moves from one location to another for a number of different factors. For example, a migrant might move to seek out better economic opportunities. A refugee is defined by the UN as someone who is escaping conflict or violence in their home country.
    • What difficulties do refugees face as they try to find safety?
      • Possible response: Responses will vary, but people face a number of challenges when they are displaced. They face danger in their home country—the danger that initially pushed them out—and then they face further danger during their journey to another country. Some refugees do not have the correct paperwork to enter other countries, so they have to do so in unsafe ways. They might also face hard conditions at refugee camps. Then, once they are in a new country, they face challenges navigating the asylum process. Finally, they might face racism or xenophobia (prejudice against people from other countries) in the new country they’ve settled in.

    [Slide 3] Facilitate a discussion about factors that impact a refugee’s experience.

    • What specific factors might influence the refugee experience in the U.S.?
      • Possible response: Responses will vary, but might include where the refugees come from, and the relationship between that country and the U.S.; the race(s) of the displaced people seeking refuge; the way that the media and government talk about the refugee group; the ages of the displaced people; and the presence of other refugee communities in the area.
    Step 2: Learn about some of the causes and effects of the U.S.–Vietnam war(30 min)

    Purpose: Students explore the factors that led to displacement of people in Vietnam, and how the conflict in Vietnam and Vietnamese refugees were viewed by people in the United States.

    You might say: In our last lesson, we closed by watching a news report about the fall of Saigon. This event marked the end of the U.S.–Vietnam War and the start of displacement of a large portion of the Vietnamese population. But what caused the fall of Saigon, and how did people in the U.S. feel about the conflict in Vietnam? We’re going to explore that now.

    [Slides 4–15] Provide students some background knowledge about the United States’s involvement in Vietnam.

    • Slide 4. Vietnam was under French control until World War II, when Vietnam was invaded by Japan.
    • Slide 5. In 1945, Japan lost their fight in WWII and retreated from Vietnam. At the time, the Vietnamese leader of the Indochinese Communist Party, Hồ Chí Minh, declared Vietnam independent and set up a government in the North.
    • Slide 6. The French refused to release control of Vietnam and backed another leader, Emperor Bảo Đại, in the South and set up Saigon as the capitol of the country in 1949.
    • Slide 7. The North and South fought for control of the entire country.
    • Slide 8. In 1954, Hồ Chí Minh defeated the French, and the Geneva Convention negotiated peace in the region. The French exited the region and Hồ Chí Minh was to remain in control of North Vietnam until the election was held in 1956, with the goal that the elections would unify Vietnam.
    • Slide 9. However, elections were never held because another leader took control of South Vietnam and declared himself the president of the country. His name was Ngô Đình Diệm, and he was criticized for his treatment of people in South Vietnam. Even though Diệm faced opposition, the U.S. backed him because they did not support the communist government of North Vietnam.
    • Slide 10. In 1959, North and South Vietnam attacked one another as a result of the oppressive treatment of Vietnamese communists in South Vietnam.
    • Slide 11. In 1961, President Kennedy sent U.S. troops to investigate the attacks within the country. The U.S. wanted to make sure that Vietnam did not become a communist country.
    • Slide 12. In August of 1964, Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, authorizing President Lyndon Johnson to use armed forces against the communist government of North Vietnam.
    • Slide 13. The war became increasingly unpopular in anti-war groups in the United States after the event known as the Mỹ Lai massacre came to light. The massacre occurred in March of 1968, but was not known to the world until November of 1969.
    • Slide 14. Anti-war sentiments grew in the U.S., fueled by the collective feeling that the government was not being open or honest about their reasons for being in Vietnam, and concern that they continued to send troops there even as it was becoming clear they were not winning the war.
    • Slide 15. The U.S. withdrew from Vietnam in 1973.
    • Slide 16. By the end of the war, as many as two million Vietnamese civilians had been killed. 1.1 million North Vietnamese and Viet Cong soldiers died; 200,000 to 250,000 South Vietnamese soldiers died; and nearly 58,000 U.S. soldiers died or were missing after the war.

    [Slide 17] Facilitate a student exploration of primary sources. Students investigate two images and answer the guiding questions that follow. Distribute the Source Exploration handout, review the directions with students, and introduce the sources and guiding questions.

    [Slides 18–22] Provide students some background knowledge about the end of the war in Vietnam (sources: Britannica, UNAVSA, The Vietnamese Boat People).

    • Slide 18. After the U.S. removed troops from the region, the North Vietnamese forces took over the southern part of the country.
    • Slide 19. “The fall of Saigon,” as it is called in Western media, refers to the day (April 30, 1975) when North Vietnamese forces took control of the capitol of Saigon, which had been controlled by South Vietnamese forces with Western help.
    • Slide 20. Vietnamese people have different names for this event. In Vietnam, it is known as “Liberation Day,” which signals a celebration of the events that took place that day. The North Vietnamese forces who took control of Saigon, and created a unified country again in the process, see this as a day to remember positively. Vietnamese refugees see it as a day that drove them out of their home. They remember the events of that day as “The Day We Lost the Country,” “Black April,” “National Day of Shame,” or “National Day of Resentment.”
    • Slide 21. The differences in the names used for the same event show us that feelings and views around it are complex and varied.
    • Slide 22. The events of April 30, 1975, caused mass displacement for Vietnamese people, who had to flee the oppression and legacy of the U.S.–Vietnam War. Many Vietnamese people fled Vietnam by sea, as part of a large group that became known by the U.S. and international media as the Vietnamese Boat People.

    Teacher Tip: Teaching About War

    This step includes a video about the Mỹ Lai massacre, a difficult but historically important moment to talk about. When it comes to teaching about war, it is important to be thoughtful about how we introduce it. If you need guidance on how to navigate these difficult conversations around war, please check out these resources:

    [Slide 23] Facilitate a discussion on the causes of conflict in Vietnam. Ask students to reflect on the following questions individually and then as a class.

    • According to the UN’s definition, a refugee is someone escaping conflict and/or violence in their home country. How did the U.S. add to the conflict and violence that occurred in Vietnam from 1961–1973?
      • Possible response: Responses will vary, but students might discuss the increase in fighting that happened once U.S. troops entered Vietnam, the Mỹ Lai massacre, or the number of people who died during this conflict in Vietnam in their reponses.
    • Given the United States’s involvement in Vietnam, did people in the U.S. have an obligation to welcome Vietnamese refugees into their communities? Why or why not?
      • Possible response: Responses will vary, depending on students’ views. Students might say that the U.S. government and society had a responsibility to welcome refugees since the U.S. played a role in the violence there. Other people might say the opposite. Push students to explain their thinking here and give students opportunities to respond to each other’s thoughts. You could also put up a list of the vocabulary so far (refugee, asylum, solidarity, humanity, resilience) and ask students to use the vocabulary in their responses.
    Step 3: Listen to Vietnamese American refugee stories(15 min)

    Purpose: Students explore stories of Vietnamese refugees after their displacement in 1975. Students should understand that the stories of Vietnamese refugees are all different, but all demonstrate resilience. They should also understand the power of storytelling when it comes to standing in solidarity with displaced people.

    You might say: The conflict and violence in Vietnam were caused by many different factors, including people and countries fighting for their own interests. This resulted in the mass displacement of people. Now we will explore firsthand stories of Vietnamese refugees. Each can help us learn more about what it means to be resilient and how we can support displaced people.

    [Slide 24] Facilitate a jigsaw activity.

    • Distribute the Jigsaw handout and review directions and how to listen to each story.
      • Point out to students that once they are in their assigned story, they will need to click the “Listen” button to play the audio for the right story.
    • Organize students into groups of four and have each student listen to a different story.
    • After students are done analyzing their assigned source, invite students to report out what they learned in their small groups. Remind students to write notes in their Jigsaw handout based on what their teammates learned from listening to the story they were assigned.

    [Slide 25] Facilitate a closing reflection on Vietnamese refugee experiences. Ask:

    • What lessons can we learn from these Vietnamese American refugees about how we should support refugee communities?
    Step 4: Respond to the Module 1 driving question(20 min)

    Purpose: Students synthesize and demonstrate their learning by drawing on oral histories and research notes to respond to the module driving question.

    You might say: In today’s lesson, we built more context about the events that led to the displacement of Vietnamese people. We built some understanding of the experiences of Vietnamese refugees by listening to their firsthand stories. In this module, we’ve explored Vietnamese culture, the identity terms that people in the AAPI community use, the history of those terms, and much more. All of this has helped us learn more about who the Vietnamese American refugees were, before and after displacement. As we close out our module, let’s reflect on that learning by responding to our module driving question.

    [Slide 26] Distribute the Module 1 Writing Response handout. Review the directions with students.

    • Respond to the Module 1 driving question: Why were Vietnamese people displaced in the 1970s?
    • Use key vocabulary terms (e.g., refugee, displacement, AAPI, asylum, resilience, solidarity, culture, humanity), historical context, and evidence from oral histories.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Module 2: Resettlement in the U.S.

    Module Overviewicon

    Module 2: Resettlement in the U.S.

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

     

    Unit Driving Question

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

     

    Module Driving Question

    What can we learn from refugees, past and present, about their experiences of resettling in the United States?

     

    Icon

    Module Overview

    In this module, students explore the challenges and opportunities that Vietnamese refugees navigated in their displacement and resettlement.

    In Lesson 2.1, students reflect on the lessons we can learn from the experiences of Vietnamese refugees and use those lessons to explore recent refugee crises, including the 2021 Afghan refugee crisis. In Lesson 2.2, students listen to the experiences of Vietnamese Americans and look for themes of community, resilience, humanity, and solidarity in their stories. They listen to oral histories and interviews of people standing in solidarity with Vietnamese refugees, and reflect on how they can include aspects of these stories in their final podcasts. In Lesson 2.3, students reflect on what people should consider when telling stories that are not their own, and reflect on the power of storytelling. Lastly, they draw on what they have learned so far in this unit to drive inquiry about the content of their podcasts, and decide which refugee experiences to share in their podcast.

    Lesson 2.1: Solidarity & Support (75 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2.Civ.1.6-8CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Compare the experiences of displaced Vietnamese people with those of other recently displaced people (e.g., from Afghanistan and Ukraine).
    • Explain how podcasting can be used to stand in solidarity with displaced communities of the past, present, and future.
    In this lesson, students reflect on the experiences of refugees of the past and today. Students listen to stories of communities that welcomed Vietnamese refugees to learn what solidarity looked like in the 1960s and 1970s. Then, students compare the experiences of some modern refugees to identify commonalities. Finally, students reflect on how they can use podcasting to stand in solidarity with people experiencing displacement, as a way to deepen their understanding of this unit’s themes: community, resilience, and humanity.
    Lesson 2.2: Resettlement Histories (100 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2.Civ.1.6-8CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Research Vietnamese refugee communities in the United States for evidence of community, resilience, and humanity.
    • Identify a person, community, or event that will be the focus of their podcast.
    In this lesson, students read a firsthand story of resettlement by Vietnamese American refugee Linda Thong, and reflect on how sharing her story can help motivate others to stand in solidarity with displaced communities. Then, students research displaced communities, with a continued focus on Vietnamese American refugee communities, and reflect on their experiences. Finally, drawing on their research and working with their podcast team, students select the focus for their podcast.
    Lesson 2.3: Research Your Podcast (80 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    D2.His.6.6-8D2.His.4.6-8

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Identify the elements of responsible storytelling, for when we are sharing stories that are not our own.
    • Collaboratively research the focus of my team’s podcast.
    • Answer the module driving question.
    In this lesson, students participate in a collaborative activity and discussion that aim to identify what students must consider when telling stories that are not their own. Then, students work in their podcast teams to outline (i.e., storyboard) the content and flow of their podcast conversation. Finally, drawing on what they have learned in Module 2, students respond to the module driving question.
    Module Assessments
    • Lesson 2.1: Poem Analysis
    • Lesson 2.2: Resettlement Histories Notes Organizer, Developing Your Podcast
    • Lesson 2.3: Podcast Research & Outline, Module 2 Writing Response
    Vocabulary
    • Students are working with the same vocabulary they were introduced to in Module 1.

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 2.1: Solidarity & Support

    Teacher GuideIcon

    Lesson 2.1: Solidarity & Support

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    What can we learn from refugees, past and present, about their experiences of resettling in the United States?

    Learning Targets

    I can: 

    • Compare the events and experiences of the 2021 Afghan refugee crisis with the Vietnamese refugee crisis of the 1970s.
    • Reflect on how I can use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced communities of the past, present, and future.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will reflect on the experiences of refugees of the past and today. You will listen to stories of communities that welcomed Vietnamese refugees to learn what solidarity looked like in the 1960s and 1970s. Then, you will compare the experiences of some modern refugees to identify commonalities. Finally, you will reflect on how you can use podcasting to stand in solidarity with people experiencing displacement, as a way to deepen your understanding of this unit’s themes: community, resilience, and humanity.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Analyze a student poem on the refugee experience in the U.S.: Read “Refuge” by Jason Fotso and complete the Poem Analysis handout to learn from one student’s perspective of their experience as a student watching the world react to the Syrian refugee crisis in 2015. Discuss your responses in a small group.
    2. Analyze displacement and resettlement as an ongoing issue: Watch the videos “Afghanistan crisis explained for kids” and “How Seattle’s Vietnamese community is helping Afghan refugees” to learn about the displacement and resettlement of Afghan refugees in 2021. Identify how their refugee experiences, regardless of the reason for displacement, are similar to or different from those of the Vietnamese refugees you learned about previously.
    3. Reflect on podcasting stories of solidarity: Listen to a podcast highlighting a refugee’s story and an example of solidarity, and discuss the extent to which podcasting can serve as a tool to support refugees in our community. Then, as a team, review the Podcast Rubric in preparation for your final project and learn more about storytelling. Finally, revisit your Know & Need to Know chart.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes 

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:75 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D2. Civ.1.6-8: Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental contexts.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students reflect on the experiences of refugees of the past and today. Students listen to stories of communities that welcomed Vietnamese refugees to learn what solidarity looked like in the 1960s and 1970s. Then, students compare the experiences of some modern refugees to identify commonalities. Finally, students reflect on how they can use podcasting to stand in solidarity with people experiencing displacement, as a way to deepen their understanding of this unit’s themes: community, resilience, and humanity.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 2: Preview the Teacher Tip about Ukraine. Decide whether or not you will bring up the conflict in Ukraine as an example after reading the Teacher Tip in Step 2.
    • Step 3: Preview podcast sources. Decide whether you want students to listen to one or two podcasts during Step 3. if you only have time for them to listen to one each, use a jigsaw activity.
    • Step 3: Preview the Teacher Tip about podcast length. Decide what the right length for student podcasts should be, and provide this guidance as students review the Podcast Rubric.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Analyze a student poem on the refugee experience in the U.S.(20 min)

    Purpose: Students read a poem about refugees, written by a then-18-year-old student, that encourages them to think about the positive and negative ways that people see refugees. Students walk away from this step understanding that the way that refugees are perceived has a direct effect on how those refugees are treated.

    You might say: The way we see other people, and our willingness to accept those who are different from us, have a huge impact on how people are treated in our communities. We are going to explore the relationship between how people are seen and how they are treated a little more through the following poem.

    [Slide 2] Read a poem about refugees to support an initial discussion on empathy.

    • Distribute the Poem Analysis handout and review the directions with students.
    • Read the poem Refuge by Jason Fotso aloud and invite students to follow along.
    • Prompt students to respond to the guiding questions, then discuss their responses in small groups.

    [Slides 3–4] Facilitate a discussion about refugees in our own communities.

    • Display the Pew Research Center’s interactive map “Where have refugees settled in the U.S.?”
      • Move through the years below the map manually, or play the animation. Ask students to discuss their wonderings/noticings as a whole group. Talking points:
        • What do you notice and wonder about the different groups that have resettled in the U.S.?
        • What challenges do you think people might face when they are resettling in the U.S.? Do those challenges change depending on the country they were displaced from?
        • What opportunities do you think people might have when they resettle in the U.S.? What factors might influence the opportunities they have?

    You might say: In this module, we are going to hear stories directly from Vietnamese Americans, and other people who stood in solidarity with and demonstrated compassion and empathy toward Vietnamese American refugees. We’ll also learn about people who chose to make the lives of Vietnamese American people more difficult and refused to welcome them into their community out of misplaced fear. By exploring all of these stories, we will gain insight into community, humanity, and resilience. We will take these lessons with us when we think about how we can support refugee communities today.

    Teacher Tip: Discussing Resettlement

    Given the reality of increased displacement around the world right now, there is a possibility that you are discussing this subject with students who have faced displacement in their own lives. When we consider economic displacement due to factors like a lack of affordable housing options within the U.S., that number of students increases. Here are some resources you can explore to further inform how you can mindfully facilitate and support these discussions in your classroom.

    Step 2: See displacement and resettlement as an ongoing issue(25 min)

    Purpose: Students connect their thinking around Vietnamese American refugees to another group facing a refugee crisis today: the Afghan people. Students learn a little about the Afghan refugee crisis, then hear about a group of Vietnamese Americans who are helping with the Afghan resettlement.

    You might say: Vietnamese American refugees are one of many groups of people that have experienced displacement and resettled in the United States. There are many examples from the past and present of people facing the hardships of displacement. In 2021, Afghan people faced displacement when the United States ended its military operation in Afghanistan. We are going to hear how Vietnamese Americans stood up to support Afghan refugees as they were displaced and resettled in the United States.

    [Slide 5] Play the video Afghanistan crisis explained for kidsin its entirety [5:36].

    • Explain to students that this video depicts a recent series of events that lead to the displacement and resettlement of a group of people.
    • Review guiding questions with students before playing the video.
      • What similarities do you notice between the Afghan refugee crisis and the Vietnamese refugee crisis?
        • Possible response: Some similarities include: the existence of conflict between two groups trying to establish their rule in the country, causing instability; and having to live under an oppressive government, causing harm. There is also a similarity between the Taliban’s capture of the capitol and the fall of Saigon: both signify the fall of one government and the rise of another. Finally, there is the commonality of U.S. forces leaving both territories after exerting their authority there for many years, which also caused instability.
      • What might Afghan refugees be feeling as they are being displaced? What might they need as they resettle?
        • Possible response: Responses will vary, but you should push students to identify specific emotions to build the idea of empathy through this lesson. Some examples include fear, sadness, grief, uncertainty, confusion, resentment, and maybe hope that things will improve. This helps us understand that displaced people need empathy and humanity, as well as for people in their new countries to help them navigate these heavy feelings.
    • Invite students to turn and talk, and share their responses with one other student.

    [Slide 6] Play the video How Seattle’s Vietnamese community is helping Afghan refugees in its entirety [8:05].

    • Explain to students that this is just one example of a group of people stepping up to support Afghan refugees during their displacement and resettlement in 2021.
    • Review guiding questions with students before playing the video.
      • Why are Vietnamese American refugees in Seattle helping Afghan refugees?
        • Possible response: Vietnamese Americans are welcoming Afghan refugees because they understand what it feels like to be displaced from your country, and to resettle in another country while also dealing with that loss. The similarities in the United States’s involvement and then abandonment in their home country also makes them want to help the Afghan community.
      • What can the actions of Vietnamese Americans teach us about showing humanity toward refugees?
        • Possible response: These actions teach us that there are many ways to support displaced people, and how similarities between communities in the U.S. that have resettled can drive us to help those facing displacement today.
    •  Invite students to turn and talk, and share their responses with one other student.

    [Slide 7] Facilitate a whole-class discussion. Invite students to participate in a discussion about how we can support refugees.

    • Based on what we have learned about the Vietnamese and Afghan refugee experiences, what can individuals and communities do to help displaced people recover as they resettle?

    Teacher Tip: Discussing Ukraine

    In 2022, the issue of displacement has been playing out on social media and mass media due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine. The people of Ukraine are facing displacement and looking for refuge around the world. The Ukrainian refugee crisis has also shed light on the issue of how refugees are treated differently around the world depending on their race. It is a challenging and complex topic to unpack, and one that you can discuss with students if you are able to extend this lesson. Here are some resources you might consider:

    Step 3: Reflect on podcasting stories of solidarity(30 min)

    Purpose: Students listen to two podcasts in a jigsaw activity and discuss the role that podcasting can play in standing in solidarity with displaced communities.

    You might say: After hearing more about a different refugee community and connecting it to the lessons we have learned from Vietnamese American refugees, it is time to reflect more deeply on how we will highlight through our final project what we have learned about showing humanity to displaced people.

    Teacher Tip: Storytelling

    We’re going to use storytelling for our final project because it’s an important part of creating deeper understanding. If you have time to extend this lesson, play the BBC video “The science of storytelling” in its entirety [4:37] to help students consider the power of storytelling.

    • Before playing the video, share with students two guiding questions:
      • How can stories shape the ways in which people see the world?
      • What about how people see marginalized groups, specifically?
    • Invite students to share their responses in small groups, then ask:
      • Even though the video talked mostly about books, how can the information about storytelling help us understand the purpose of our final project podcast?

    [Slide 8] Play a podcast episode highlighting a story of solidarity toward Vietnamese refugees.

    • Review the guiding questions below with students, then play one of the two podcast episodes (“The guy who steered the ship” and “Sound of freedom”). Each one is about 16 minutes long.
      • How does this story inspire its audience to show humanity and solidarity toward displaced people?
      • What stood out to you in terms of how this story was told?

    [Slide 9] Connecting to your final project. Distribute copies of the Podcast Rubric. As students read through the rubric, invite them to discuss the following questions as a podcast team:

    • What ideas do you have for creating a podcast?
    • What questions do you still have about creating a podcast?

     [Slide 10] Invite students to update their Know & Need to Know chart.

    • This is a good opportunity to update your class Know & Need to Know chart that you established in Lesson 1.2, particularly around the questions:
      • What do you know about creating a podcast?
      • What questions do you have about creating a podcast?
    • Students should work as a team to update their chart before sharing as a whole class.

    Teacher Tip: “The Right Length” Rubric Guidance

    The rubric includes a row about “delivery.” In this section of the rubric, students are asked to make their podcast “just the right length.” We wanted to leave this open for you to decide what the right length might be, given the amount of time students have to complete their podcast in your class. We suggest guiding students to create a podcast that is 5–6 minutes long, but you should choose the length given your class’s needs.

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 2.2: Resettlement Histories

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 2.2: Resettlement Histories

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    What can we learn from refugees, past and present, about their experiences of resettling in the United States?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Read a Vietnamese refugee story about resettling in the United States.
    • Research Vietnamese refugee experiences and communities in the United States for evidence of humanity, community, and resilience.
    • Identify a person, community, or event impacted by a refugee crisis to highlight in your podcast.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will read a firsthand story of resettlement by Vietnamese American refugee Linda Thong, and reflect on how sharing her story can help motivate others to stand in solidarity with displaced communities. Then, you will research displaced communities, with a continued focus on Vietnamese American refugee communities, and reflect on their experiences. Finally, drawing on your research and working with your podcast team, select the focus for your podcast.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Read Linda Thong’s story: Using your Resettlement Histories Notes Organizer, read a story of displacement. Work with your project teams to unpack the message behind this story and how it can be used to help people in your community show humanity toward refugees.
    2. Listen to stories of Vietnamese resettlement: Use your Resettlement Histories Notes Organizer to listen to stories of resettlement in the U.S. for evidence of the themes of humanity, community, and resilience.
    3. Research where displaced communities resettled: Use the Resettlement Histories Notes Organizer to learn more about displaced communities that have resettled in your region and identify refugee stories you could share in your podcast.
    4. Develop your podcast message: Watch the National Geographic video “Developing your audio story,” then work through the Developing Your Podcast handout with your podcast team to identify the message of solidarity you want to build.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:100 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D2. Civ.1.6-8: Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental contexts.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students read a firsthand story of resettlement by Vietnamese American refugee Linda Thong, and reflect on how sharing her story can help motivate others to stand in solidarity with displaced communities. Then, students research displaced communities, with a continued focus on Vietnamese American refugee communities, and reflect on their experiences. Finally, drawing on their research and working with their podcast team, students select the focus for their podcast.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 2: Preview sources. Note the different lengths of the sources and decide whether you would like to edit some sources for length, or have some students look at one source while others look at two.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Read Linda Thong’s story(20 min)

    Purpose: Students unpack the message behind Linda Thong’s story of displacement and resettlement, while thinking about the importance of sharing stories of resettlement with others. Then, students reflect on how to tell stories in a way that is respectful toward the communities they are highlighting.

    You might say: We’ve been discussing the power of storytelling and how we will use our final product to highlight stories of humanity, resilience, and community in Vietnamese American refugee communities. Let’s reflect on the importance of telling these stories, and on how we can do so respectfully even when the experiences described are unlike our own.

    [Slide 2] Prepare students to read Linda Thong’s story.

    • Invite podcast teams to read through the transcript together and respond to the questions.

    [Slide 3] Facilitate a discussion. Invite students to discuss in their podcasting teams, then share out whole-class.

    • What should we be mindful of when we highlight a story of someone outside of our community?
    • How can we tell other people’s stories in a respectful way?
    Step 2: Listen to stories of Vietnamese resettlement(20 min)

    Purpose: Students learn about several stories of Vietnamese American resettlement. As students listen to these stories, they look for evidence of the three themes in this unit (humanity, resilience, and community) and for missed opportunities, when people in the U.S. could have done more to support resettlement.

    You might say: We are now going to explore three primary sources that highlight several experiences of Vietnamese American refugees. As we look at these sources, remember to look for evidence of community, resilience, and humanity. We will also reflect on what more could have been done. As resilient as the Vietnamese American community is, the experiences of Vietnamese refugees could have been a lot less traumatic if they’d had more support from their new communities as they resettled. We can learn how to better support displaced people by reflecting on how we have treated them in the past.

    [Slide 4] Review the themes students will use in their Source Exploration.

    • Community: What examples do we see in this source of Vietnamese American refugees being welcomed into a community or creating their own?
    • Humanity: What examples do we see in this source of actions that helped support Vietnamese Americans in general, or that helped the narrator specifically?
    • Resilience: What examples do we see in this source of resilience by the narrator or people in their community?
    • Missed opportunities: What examples do we see in this source of moments when people could have been more supportive of Vietnamese American refugees? What could have been done differently?

    [Slide 5] Prepare students to analyze sources.

    • Direct students to the Source Exploration section of their Resettlement Histories Notes Organizer, then review the directions and sources with students. Point out to students that once they open each source link, they will need to click the “Listen” button to play the audio for the right story.

    [Slide 6] Facilitate a discussion on student findings from their Source Exploration. Ask:

    • Which moments stood out for you as clear examples of solidarity toward Vietnamese American refugees?
    • Which moments stood out for you as clear examples of when people could have shown more humanity toward and more solidarity with refugees?
    Step 3: Research where displaced refugees resettled (40 min)

    Purpose: Students learn more about communities that resettled in their region, the circumstances that led to their displacement, and what resettlement in the U.S. looked like for them. Whenever possible, students are encouraged to research Vietnamese American refugees near them, which will help with the focus of their podcast.

    You might say: We have been talking about Vietnamese American refugees and their resettlement around the country. But, as we started to discuss yesterday, there are many communities that have faced displacement and had to resettle in the United States.

    [Slide 7] Display the Pew Research Center interactive map “Where have refugees settled in the U.S.?

    You might say: We saw this map in our last lesson and noticed how people from different countries have resettled in each state. Today we are going to build on that understanding by researching refugee communities in the state where we live, the factors that led to their displacement, and the challenges and opportunities these communities faced as they resettled.

    [Slide 8] Facilitate and guide student research.

    • Direct students to the research portion of their Resettlement Histories Notes Organizer and review the directions. Talking points:
      • Work in your podcast teams to research refugee communities around you.
      • As a team, use the interactive map “Where have refugees settled in the U.S.?” to identify a refugee community that resettled in your state between 2002–2017.

    [Slide 9] Facilitate a whole-class share-out on what students learned from their research.

    • Invite students to share their research as teams. Ask:
      • What new information did you learn about refugee communities?
    Step 4: Develop your podcast message(20 min)

    Purpose: Students watch a video of the thinking that goes into developing an audio story before they reflect on and develop the message behind their podcast.

    You might say: You all will be creating a podcast about standing in solidarity with communities that are facing displacement today, through the lessons we have learned from different people and groups in the Vietnamese American community. This means that as podcast teams, you’ll need to have a clear purpose and message for your podcast before you start to research and record it. In this last part of our lesson, we will reflect on the message we want to send through our podcast.

    [Slide 10] Play the National Geographic video about developing an audio story in its entirety [7:42].

    [Slide 11] Help students develop their podcast message.

    • Direct students to Part 2 of their Developing Your Podcast handout and review the directions.

    You might say: By developing the message of your podcast first, you can make sure to prioritize your message as you research and develop the rest. While parts of your messaging might change by the time you get to your final podcast, the overall purpose—to stand in solidarity with refugee groups—should be your guiding force through this process.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 2.3: Research Your Podcast

    Teacher GuideIcon

    Lesson 2.3: Research Your Podcast

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity? 

    Module Driving Question:

    What can we learn from refugees, past and present, about their experiences of resettling in the United States?

    Learning Target:

    I can: 

    • Reflect on how I can share stories that are not my own in a responsible way.
    • Collaboratively storyboard the content and flow of my team’s podcast conversation.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will participate in a collaborative activity and discussion that aim to identify what we must consider when telling stories that are not our own. Then, you will work in your podcast teams to outline (i.e., storyboard) the content and flow of your podcast conversation. Finally, drawing on what you have learned in Module 2, you will respond to the module driving question.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Reflect on the benefits and responsibilities of storytelling: Use the Responsible Storytelling handout to explore what we must keep in mind in order to be empathetic podcasters who stand in solidarity with displaced people.
    2. Research your podcast: Use your Podcast Research & Outline handout to select a refugee community today, which you will research further and highlight through your podcast.
    3. Outline your podcast: Working in podcast teams, use the Podcast Research & Outline handout to plan your podcast’s content and flow.
    4. Respond to the Module 2 driving question: Use the Module 2 Writing Response handout to reflect on what we can learn from refugees about their experiences of resettling in the United States.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:80 minutes
    Standards
    • C3

    D2. His.6.6-8: Analyze how people’s perspectives influenced what information is available in the historical sources they created. 

    D2. His.4.6-8: Analyze multiple factors that influenced the perspectives of people during different historical eras.

    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students participate in a collaborative activity and discussion that aim to identify what students must consider when telling stories that are not their own. Then, students work in their podcast teams to outline (i.e., storyboard) the content and flow of their podcast conversation. Finally, drawing on what they have learned in Module 2, students respond to the module driving question.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Set up teams. Read over the team/partner work in Step 1 and decide how you will pair students up if they are not already permanently working in their podcast teams.
    • Step 1: Preview Teacher Tip. Read over the Teacher Tip and decide if you will use anchor charts to capture class considerations.
    • Step 2: Plan research time guidance. Consider technology use, time allotted for research, and other student-facing instructions for the research time on this step.
    • Step 3: Set up conferences. Read over the Teacher Tip and decide if you will conference with students while they outline their projects. If so, plan for how long you will conference with teams.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Reflect on the benefits and responsibilities of storytelling(20 min)

    Purpose: Students reflect on and discuss the considerations we must keep in mind when we are telling stories that are not our own. Then they discuss the questions they should think through as they research and outline their podcasts in Steps 3 and 4.

    You might say: For our final project, we will be recording podcasts in our project teams. In your podcast, you are going to highlight a community facing displacement today and create a podcast about how we can stand in solidarity with them. Most of us do not belong to the refugee communities that we will be researching, so we must make sure that through our storytelling, we are centering that community and not ourselves. There are responsible ways to tell stories that are not our own, but they require intentional reflection and planning. We’re going to do that reflection and planning right now.

    [Slide 2] Reflect on your own story. Direct students to Part 1 of their Responsible Storytelling handout and read the directions out loud.

    • Reflect on the following questions through the lens of your own identity.
      • Think back to your identity map. Out of all those identities, which two are the most important to you?
      • Now, think about a person, fictional or real, who is the complete opposite of those two identities. How would you feel if they were in charge of telling your story?
      • Keep thinking about this person who is different from you. How would you like them to tell your story? What would make you feel like your story was told well? What would make you feel like it was not told well?
      • Connect it to our podcast. What are important things to consider when we are telling stories that are not our own?

    [Slides 3–4] Participate in an active-listening exercise. Provide instructions for the partner-listening activity. Talking points:

    • Work with a partner to reflect on the identity questions you just answered.
    • One person speaks. The other listens and asks clarifying questions, but does not share their own thoughts or opinions until it is their turn.
    • Partner A will have five minutes to respond to any of the discussion questions from their handout. If there is a lull in their response, partner B can ask one of the following questions.
            • When you said ____, what did you mean?
            • Can you elaborate on your statement about _______?
            • Can you give an example to support your statement about _______?
    • After five minutes, partner B will have five minutes to respond to any of the discussion questions. If there is a lull in their response, partner A can ask one of the above questions.
    • After both partners have spoken, each partner has three minutes to reflect on and discuss one statement their partner made that stuck with them during the activity.
    • I will keep time and let you know when it is time to switch.

    [Slide 5] Debrief in podcast teams. Direct students to Part 2 of their handout and read the directions aloud.

    • When it comes to other people’s stories, what is the importance of listening actively? How does listening actively allow us to center the speaker?
    • What thoughts did your partner share about considerations we should keep in mind when telling other people’s stories? Make a list of thoughts from your whole team.

    [Slide 6] Build a class list of considerations for storytelling.

    • Invite podcast teams to share out the considerations they discussed.
    • Record the considerations so that all students can see and reference them.

    Teacher Tip: Capture Class Thoughts (Anchor Chart)

    For this activity, you can have teams share out their collaborative lists of considerations, and allow students to add anything they hear that they did not think of to their own lists. Alternatively, you can build a collaborative list of considerations in an anchor chart that students can continuously reference as they build out their final project.

    [Slide 7] Explore other possible podcast considerations.

    • Use the list on the slide to acknowledge some of the considerations that we should keep in mind as we practice responsible storytelling.
    • Invite students to identify any other considerations this discussion brought up in their minds that they have not yet shared.
    Step 2: Research your podcast(20 min)

    Purpose: Students select the focus for their podcast and begin their research.

    You might say: Now that we have reflected on how we can use podcasting as a tool to tell stories respectfully and stand in solidarity with displaced people, we are going to select a community to focus on in our podcast. In Part 1 of your Podcast Research handout, you will see links for five communities currently facing displacement. In your podcast teams, select the community you want to highlight, then begin the research you’ll need to start outlining your podcast.

    [Slide 8] Review research instructions. Direct students to Part 1 of their Podcast Research handout and review the directions for research.

    You might say: It’s important to note that you might need to do more research later on. As you outline, script, and record, you might determine that there is missing information that you want to include; that’s a normal part of the process of creating a podcast. In our upcoming lessons, you will have plenty of time to complete any research that you don’t complete today.

    Step 3: Outline your podcast(20 min)

    Purpose: Students outline their podcast by drawing on the list of considerations identified and the topic they selected in the last lesson.

    You might say: Now, we are going to outline our podcast. The outline is used to make sure that as you create your podcast, the story you are trying to tell is well thought-out and flows in a captivating way.

    [Slide 8] Review outline expectations and help students get started. Direct students to Part 2 of their Podcast Research handout and review the directions as a class.

    Support students in sequencing their podcast content. Direct students to Part 3 of their handout, where students sequence the content they have identified for their podcast.

    • Provide students guidance on how much time they have for this outline.
    • Provide students information about conferences with you (if you are going to hold conferences).

    Teacher Tip: Conferencing With Podcast Teams

    As students outline their podcasts, create a rotation schedule to conference with all teams. As you do so, you might ask them:

    • Have you selected a story that you want to share? If not, have you narrowed it down to a couple of possibilities? Let’s brainstorm some directions you could take.
    • If you have selected a story, what do you want your audience to walk away having learned? Do you want to challenge them to take a specific action after they listen? If so, what is it?
    • How does the story you are telling connect to refugees today? What message do you want to send about how refugees should be treated?
    Step 4: Respond to the Module 2 driving question(20 min)

    Purpose: Students synthesize their learning by drawing on oral histories and research notes to respond to the Module 2 driving question.

    You might say: We will use the rest of our lessons in this unit to complete our podcast. Before we really get into our podcast work, we are going to take an opportunity to reflect on what we’ve learned in Module 2.

    [Slide 9] Facilitate a reflection on what students learned in Module 2.

    • Distribute the Module 2 Writing Response handout and review directions with students.
      • Respond to the Module 2 driving question using key vocabulary terms (refugee, displacement, AAPI, asylum, resilience, solidarity, culture, humanity), historical context, and evidence from oral histories.
        • What can we learn from refugees, past and present, about their experiences of resettling in the United States?

     

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Module 3: Standing in Solidarity

    Module Overviewicon

    Module 3: Standing in Solidarity

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

     

    Unit Driving Question

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question

    How can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?

    Icon

     

    Module Overview

    In this module, students create a podcast that helps educate their community about the experiences of displaced people, and provide personal reflections on the collective responsibility we have to stand in solidarity with those experiencing displacement and resettlement. In Lesson 3.1, students explore different storytelling structures, then work in their teams to script their podcasts. In Lesson 3.2, students practice their podcasts aloud with other teams in order to give and receive peer feedback, and then revise their podcasts. In Lesson 3.3, students record their podcasts and make any final edits. In Lesson 3.4, student podcasts are published at a community event, where students and members of the broader community can listen to podcasts and discuss their collective responsibility to stand in solidarity with people who are displaced and resettling.

    Lesson 3.1: Script Your Podcast (60 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Organize their podcast research into a story outline that is chronological, circular, or a broken narrative.
    • Script their podcast.
    In this lesson, students work with their podcast team to determine the storytelling structure they will use for their podcast. After selecting their podcast structure and outlining their plan using their research, students script their podcast.
    Lesson 3.2: Practice & Revise Your Podcast (70 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4
     

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Practice their podcast with their team.
    • Use the Podcast Rubric to give constructive and actionable feedback on peer podcasts.
    • Apply relevant feedback to their podcast script.
    In this lesson, students revise their podcast script in preparation for recording their podcast in the next lesson. Students practice their podcast conversation with their team and give feedback to and receive feedback from two other teams. Then, students review the feedback they received and decide on revisions. Finally, students schedule a time to record your podcast.
    Lesson 3.3: Record Your Podcast (140 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.8.4

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Use technology tools to record, edit, and share their team’s podcast.
    In this lesson, students showcase all of the work they have done so far by recording their podcast! Students work with their team and use their podcast script to record a coherent, structured, and clear podcast.
    Lesson 3.4: Community Discussion (60 minutes)

    Key Standards for Success Criteria

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4

    Success Criteria

    By the end of the lesson, students will be able to:

    • Share their reflections on their experience podcasting.
    • Use their research notes and what they’ve learned from their peers to answer the unit driving question.
    In this final lesson, students reflect on their podcasting experience and what they’ve learned about standing in solidarity with displaced communities.
    Module Assessments
    • Lesson 3.1: Draft Podcast Script
    • Lesson 3.2: Revised Podcast Script
    • Lesson 3.3: Podcast Recording
    • Lesson 3.4: Response to Unit Driving Question
    Vocabulary
    • broken narrative: a type of storytelling structure which is told using a lot of contextual details, and the order in which events in the story are told can vary
    • chronological order: a type of storytelling structure in which the events of the story are told in the order in which they happened
    • circular order: a type of storytelling structure which starts at the height of the conflict (the climax), then goes back to the beginning and continues in chronological order

     

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.1: Script Your Podcast

    Teacher Guide 

    Lesson 3.1: Script Your Podcast 

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Organize my podcast research into a story outline.
    • Script my podcast.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will work with your podcast team to determine the storytelling structure you will use for your podcast. After selecting your podcast structure and outlining your plan using your research, you will script your podcast.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Explore different podcast structures: Watch the video How to write scripts for your podcast, and learn about the three possible podcast structures you can use as a team.
    2. Select your podcast structure: Use the Podcast Structure handout to select the structure you will use for your podcast, then fill in the handout with your research as a team. Determine if any more research is needed.
    3. Script your podcast: Work with your team and your Podcast Script handout to determine who will perform each part of your script. As you script, remember to go back and check that you are meeting the criteria of the Podcast Rubric.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:60 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D2.His.14.6-8: Explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past. 
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students work with their podcast team to determine the storytelling structure they will use for their podcast. After selecting their podcast structure and outlining their plan using their research, students script their podcast.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Steps 2 & 3: As students work to outline and script their podcasts, consider creating a plan for conferencing with each team to provide feedback on their podcast plan.
    • Step 3: If you would like students to look at another podcast script before writing their own, check out the Castos blog post “How to Write a Podcast Script” to see examples and tips.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Explore different podcast structures(20 min)

    Purpose: Students unpack the three main formats for podcast storytelling through a video and a series of examples using Nicki Tung’s story from Module 1. They will choose one storytelling structure when they plan and script their podcasts later in this lesson.

    You might say: In a few days, we will be publishing our podcasts! We will have a publishing event to showcase our work, and will spend the next few lessons preparing for that event. Up to now, you have been doing research and planning around what you want to present in your podcast. You have selected a story about a refugee community you want to highlight, identified a message of solidarity you want to create through your podcast, and created a general outline of the different parts of your podcast. Now, you must decide how you will structure all of this information. Podcasting is storytelling, and stories need an arc that takes an audience on a clear journey—but there are many ways to create a storytelling arc. We are going to unpack three different storytelling structures, and then you will choose one to use as a team.

    [Slide 2] Play the PRX video How to write scripts for your podcast in its entirety [3:58].

    • After watching the video, ask students to reflect on the following questions:
      • What is the speaker saying about “characters” in podcasting?
        • Possible response: Every podcast needs to have characters. They can be individuals or groups of people, but to create a compelling podcast, you need to identify the characters whose story will drive the plot forward. The podcast should include elements of conflict the characters are facing, and use the unpacking of that conflict to drive the story as well.
      • What are three types of story structures that can be used in podcasting?
        • Possible response: chronological order, circular order, and broken narrative.

    [Slides 3–13] Unpack the three podcast structures using Nicki Tung’s story as an example. Provide guidance for each structure using the information below.

    • Slide 3. Chronological order is when the events of the story are told in the order in which they happened. By looking at the dates of the events we want to highlight in our story, we can create a chronological timeline to build on.
    • Slides 4–5. If we were to podcast about Nicki Tung’s story in chronological order, it might sound like this:
      • After World War II, Vietnam entered a period of political instability. There was an ongoing conflict between different groups of people fighting over who would control the country.
      • In the 1960s, the U.S. became involved, and the conflict grew even more violent.
      • The U.S. left the country in 1973. In 1975, Saigon—the capitol of South Vietnam—fell to North Vietnam’s communist government.
      • This new government was very hostile toward some of its citizens, especially those who had supported the Southern forces, which were backed by the U.S.
      • In 1979, Nicki Tung and many others fled Vietnam and looked to resettle elsewhere.
      • After leaving Vietnam, Tung landed in Malaysia. As a refugee, she was allowed to stay there for a month, but the Malaysian government did little to support her or other refugees. This was the beginning of the negative treatment that Tung would receive as a refugee.
      • After her time in Malaysia, Tung headed to…
    • Slide 6. Stop & reflect: The story would then continue, with the podcast host filling in some of the gaps with context. The podcast episode would end on a message of standing in solidarity with refugees, based on Tung’s story. Ask:
      • What makes this a chronological story?
        • Response: The events of the story are told in the order in which they happened.
    • Slide 7. Circular order is when the story starts at the height of the conflict or story (the climax), then it takes us back to the beginning and goes in chronological order.
    • Slide 8. If we were to podcast about Nicki Tung’s story in circular order, it might sound like this:
      • Nicki Tung doesn’t know if she will make it out alive. She has been pushed onto a small boat with other refugees in Malaysia, and she thinks the intention is for them all to drown. The boat has been dragged by the Malaysian navy into the middle of the ocean, so there is nowhere else to go. “Go away! Go back to your own country!” says the captain. The Malaysian sailors then cut the rope connecting the small boat full of Vietnamese refugees to their own, and they leave.
      • Nicki Tung is just one of thousands of people who fled Vietnam in search of safety somewhere else.
      • After World War II, Vietnam entered a period of political instability. There was ongoing conflict between different groups of people fighting over who would control the country…
    • Slide 9. Stop & reflect: The story would then continue, with the podcast host filling in some of the gaps with context. The podcast episode would end with a message of standing in solidarity with refugees based on Tung’s story. Notice how the story moves between present and past tense. Ask:
      • How does this structure help engage an audience? How is it different than a chronological structure?
        • Response: The story starts at the height of the conflict (the climax), then it takes us back to the beginning and goes in chronological order. With the story starting at the climax, the audience is hooked by the most engaging part of the story.
    • Slide 10. Broken narrative is when the story is told using a lot of contextual details, and the order in which events in the story are told can vary. In this structure, the host tells the audience about something happening to the character(s), then gives context about why it is happening, then moves on to something else happening to the characters.
    • Slides 11–12. If we were to podcast about Nicki Tung’s story using a broken narrative, it might sound like this:
      • The year is 1980, and Nicki Tung is navigating life as a refugee in the United States. She takes English classes with her dad every day and tries to stay strong, even as she is routinely met with profanity and xenophobia. People in this new place don’t understand her journey; in fact, she’s sure they’ve never met anyone who looks like her.
      • Nicki Tung is in the U.S. because of the long conflict between South and North Vietnam that culminated in 1975 with the fall of Saigon. This is when the Northern government took over the country. The conditions in Vietnam became hostile, forcing many to flee.
      • Nicki Tung doesn’t know if she will make it out alive. She has been pushed onto a small boat with other refugees in Malaysia, and she thinks the intention is for them all to drown. The boat has been dragged by the Malaysian navy into the middle of the ocean. “Go away! Go back to your own country!” says the captain. The Malaysian sailors then cut the rope connecting the small boat full of Vietnamese refugees to their own, and they leave.
      • Malaysia is a country in southeast Asia, and like many countries at the time, it was not receptive to refugees. This forced Tung and her family to flee again to Singapore. According to the South China Morning Post, from 1978–1996, over 30,000 Vietnamese refugees passed through the refugee camp that the UN created in Singapore.
    • Slide 13. Stop & reflect: The story would then continue in this way, with the podcast host jumping around between important events in Tung’s journey, followed by context about why each was happening. Ask:
      • How is this format different than the chronological and circular structures? What might this structure add to the storytelling in our podcast?
        • Response: Broken narrative is when the story is told using a lot of context, and events in the story are told out of order. In this structure, you tell the audience about something happening to your character(s), then give context about why it is happening. In chronological and circular structure, the “why” may not be established.
    Step 2: Select your podcast structure(20 min)

    Purpose: Students select a podcast structure and organize their content accordingly. Then, students identify any missing pieces for their podcast and conduct further research to fill in those gaps.

    You might say: Now that we have unpacked three different storytelling structures, it’s time for your team to select which one you are going to use and begin organizing the research and planning you have done up to this point.

    [Slide 14] Distribute the Podcast Structure handout. Read the directions with students and provide any additional guidance needed for their work time.

    [Slide 15] Facilitate a reflection on gaps in their podcast content. After students have selected their podcast structure, as they are filling in the handout with their research, have them pause briefly to reflect on the following questions. Ask:

    • As you are filling out your handout, are you noticing any gaps in your research? 
    • What information might you want to include that you have not thought of until now?
    • How will your team fill in any research gaps?

    You might say: Researching before outlining is very important. However, as we build out the structure of our story, it’s very normal to realize that there is more we want to include, or parts that we might have missed when doing our initial research. It’s part of the process!

    Step 3: Script your podcast(20 min)

    Purpose: In their teams, students choose their roles and create a script in preparation for their upcoming podcast practice and recording.                                                                                                                                                                                                 

    You might say: Now that you have determined how you will structure your podcast, it’s time to write your script. This script will be very detailed and help make sure you know exactly what to say when recording your podcast. Let’s go over what your script will look like together.

    [Slide 16] Prepare students to begin writing their script.

    • Project the Podcast Rubric and review the criteria for all five rows in the “Award-Winning Podcast Producers” column with students.
      • Clarify for students the expected length of podcasts (i.e., how many words or pages of script equal how many minutes).
      • We have found that on average, it takes 5–6 minutes to read aloud a 1,000-word script, depending on pauses and delivery speed.
    • Distribute the Podcast Script handout, then review the directions and guidance with students.

    [Slide 17] Provide students time to script.

    • As students are working, have the following tips visible. You can refer students back to them as you support students during their worktime.
    • Work collaboratively (one person should not do all the writing)
    • Make your story interesting
    • Decide if you need to do more research
    • Check the Podcast Rubric to see if you are meeting the criteria for an Award-Winning Podcast Producer.

    Let students know they will have time to finish their first drafts in the next lesson, before it is time to record them.

    Teacher Tip: Make Sure Students Share Scriptwriting Tasks

    To avoid a situation in which one student does most (or all) of the work of writing the script, coach teams in collaboration. Each team member can write part of the script, offer ideas, and suggest revisions. For example, once the team members have an outline of the questions they will discuss in their podcast, each member can be assigned a part and be responsible for scripting the response.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.2: Practice & Revise Your Podcast

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 3.2: Practice & Revise Your Podcast 

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Practice my podcast.
    • Give meaningful feedback to my peers on their podcast scripts.
    • Use peer feedback to revise my team’s podcast script.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will revise your podcast script in preparation for recording your podcast in the next lesson. You will practice your podcast conversation with your team and give feedback to and receive feedback from two other teams. Then, you will review the feedback you received and decide on revisions. Finally, you will schedule a time to record your podcast.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Workshop your podcast: Use the Podcast Feedback handout to give feedback to the teams you are paired with for your practice round.
    2. Revise your podcast: Review feedback from your peers and your own team, and make relevant changes to your podcast script. Then, review the Podcast Rubric and reflect on what still needs to be done to complete your project.
    3. Schedule your recording session: Schedule your podcast recording time with your teacher. While you wait for your recording session, practice your podcast script with your team and make any final changes.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:70 minutes
    Standards
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • timer
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students revise their podcast script in preparation for recording their podcast in the next lesson. Students practice their podcast conversation with their team and give feedback to and receive feedback from two other teams. Then, students review the feedback they received and decide on revisions. Finally, students schedule a time to record your podcast.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Make copies of podcast scripts. In the previous lesson, students created a podcast script. They might each have their own copy already, but if they don’t, consider making copies for each team member so they can make edits as they read. You can do the same at the end of this lesson once students finalize their scripts. You can alternatively consider having students pull up their scripts in Google Docs so they can edit them electronically.
    • Step 1: Print multiple feedback handouts. Decide how many rounds of feedback students will participate in during their practice. This step is set up for two rounds of feedback, but students can do fewer or more rounds. Make sure each student has one clean copy of the Podcast Feedback handout for each team they will be working with.
    • Step 1: Set up feedback pairs. Depending on how many rounds of feedback students will engage in, set up the pairs of teams ahead of time so students know who they are working with right away.
    • Step 3: Create a template for recording slots. Each slot should be 15–20 minutes. This is a good opportunity to organize teams depending on how much time they need to complete their podcasts. Schedule teams that are 100% ready to go first, giving the other teams more time to fix or expand on their podcast scripts based on the feedback they received earlier in this lesson.
    • Step 3: Give instructions for work time. As you are working to schedule all podcast teams for their recording sessions, give students guidance on what they should do until you get to their team. They should practice their revised podcast as much as possible, and finalize their script in preparation for their upcoming recording session.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Workshop your podcast(30 min)

    Purpose: Students practice their podcasts with two other teams and give each other feedback on their scripts.

    You might say: Now that we have researched, planned, and outlined our podcasts, it’s time to practice them. Your team has been working on a podcast script that lays out everything you will say in your podcast, exactly as you will say it during your recording session. You are going to go through two rounds of feedback on each other’s scripts. However, the teams you are paired with will not read your script; instead, they will watch you read your script as a team. This will enable them to provide feedback on how your story sounds aloud. It will also help you because, when you read your writing aloud, you can catch mistakes more quickly and easily. You’ll be able to make any changes needed before you record.

    [Slides 2–4] Distribute the Podcast Feedback handout. Read instructions with students and provide any further guidance needed, including expectations for peer feedback. Talking points:

    • You will participate in two rounds of feedback.
    • You will fill out one feedback form for each team you are paired with and give it to them at the end of the feedback round.
    • Between each feedback round, you will have three minutes to make quick edits to your script. These should be simple changes, like crossing out words that tripped you up or fixing grammatical errors.
    • Each team member should have a copy of their script and a pen or pencil. As your teammates read their parts of the script, circle/underline/highlight anything that sounds off or might need to be edited.
    • (Optional) Provide further guidance if needed, like how long they have for each round and how they will know it’s time to stop and to move on. If possible, provide timers to help students stay on track.
    Step 2: Revise your podcast(20 min)

    Purpose: Students review the notes they took on their scripts during feedback rounds, along with the Podcast Feedback handouts they received from their peers, to revise their podcast script.

    You might say: Now that you have participated in the feedback rounds, you have a lot of notes to review with your team! Review the notes your team took as you all read your script, along with the ones on the Podcast Feedback handouts that your peers completed for you.

    [Slide 5] Facilitate a reflection and prioritization of peer feedback.

    • Invite teams to discuss the following questions in their teams as they reflect on their feedback. Ask:
    • What feedback did we receive that we can address quickly and right away?
    • What feedback did we receive that would require us to rewrite a major part of our script? How should we address this feedback?
    • What feedback did we receive that would require us to add an entirely new part to our podcast? How do we plan to address this feedback?
    • Invite teams to share out up to three changes they are making based on peer feedback.

    [Slide 6] Invite students to reflect on the project rubric. Distribute copies of the Podcast Rubric. Instruct students to read through the rubric as a team and reflect on the following question: What do we still need to complete, or revise, in order to make sure that our podcast is meeting the rubric expectations for an award-winning podcast?

    • Invite teams to share out up to three changes or additions they are making to ensure they are meeting project expectations, based on the rubric. They can also share which recommendations from the rubric they plan to keep in mind as they record (tone, language, etc.).
    Step 3: Schedule your recording session(20 min)

    Purpose: Students schedule their recording sessions and finalize their podcast scripts.

    You might say: We are nearing the end of our podcast planning! Next, we will schedule our recording sessions. We’ll record our podcasts one team at a time to ensure that everyone has enough support for their recording. I will now walk around to schedule each team for their session.

    [Slide 7] Provide guidance on what students should be doing as you walk around to schedule recording sessions.

    Talking points:

    • Continue revising and finalizing your podcast script based on the feedback you received.
    • Once you have finalized your script, practice it aloud as a team as many times as possible.

    Teacher Tip: Scheduling Recording Sessions

    Although ideally you would be present to oversee all of the podcast recordings, it is not always feasible given the number of students you have in your class and amount of time you might have set aside to complete this project. Here are some other ideas you can consider for students to record their podcasts:

    • Podcast teams record in admin offices. Most schools have administrative offices that could be repurposed for a day or two to support student podcasting.
    • Podcast teams record in another teacher’s classroom during that teacher’s planning time.
    • Podcast teams record during lunch or after school.
    • Podcast teams record over Zoom so they can record from different locations, potentially after school.
    These options would require some extra coordination on your part, but would allow your students to record outside of your allotted class time or to do multiple recordings at the same time.

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.3: Record Your Podcast

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 3.3: Record Your Podcast 

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Come prepared to record my podcast.
    • Present my ideas clearly using digital technologies.

    Purpose

    In this lesson, you will showcase all of the work you have done so far by recording your podcast! You will work with your team and use your podcast script to record a coherent, structured, and clear podcast.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Record your podcast: Arrive at your scheduled recording time and record your podcast with your team!
    2. Use flexible time: Use the remaining time to continue recording, begin editing your podcast, or take care of tasks required to prepare for the podcast publishing event.

    Explore More

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:140 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D4.3.6–8: Present adaptations of arguments and explanations on topics of interest to others to reach audiences and venues outside the classroom using print and oral technologies (e.g., posters, essays, letters, debates, speeches, reports, and maps) and digital technologies (e.g., Internet, social media, and digital documentary).
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.8.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • n/a
    • Technology (computer, tablet, phone) with recording software
    Lesson Overview
    In this lesson, students showcase all of the work they have done so far by recording their podcast! Students work with their team and use their podcast script to record a coherent, structured, and clear podcast.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Learn about recording podcasts. Watch The Democracy Group’s “How to record podcast episodes” video [11:50] to learn about additional considerations you can implement to support student podcast sound quality.
    • Determine technology hardware and software needs in advance. Decide how students will be recording their podcasts. They might use a school computer, or you might give students the option to record their podcast on their phone. Determine if your school can provide external microphones and headphones for student computers. Recording podcasts can be as low- or high-tech as you choose.
    • Steps 1–2: Adapt slide deck to support this lesson.
    • Slide 3: Update with what students should expect as they record their podcasts.
    • Slide 4: Decide whether and how you will have students edit their podcast after they record it.
    • Step 1: Determine how to supervise podcast production: If you are using one of the Teacher Tip ideas from Lesson 3.2 to record multiple podcasts at the same time, make sure there are adults available to support and supervise students.
    • Step 1: Determine the platform you will use to record podcasts. The guidance in Step 1 includes a Teacher Tip about the Audacity platform, but you can use any recording platform you want. Make sure to preview the tool, though, so you can help students navigate it during their recording session.
    • Step 1: Determine how you will share the audio files. See the Teacher Tip at the end of Step 1 for more guidance on sharing audio files with students. Then, determine how you will upload the podcasts so they can be shared in Lesson 3.4.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

     

    Step 1: Record your podcast(120 min)

    Purpose: Students record their podcast during their scheduled recording slot.

    You might say: The time has come to record our podcasts! You will be working in your teams to record your podcast using the script you have finalized and practiced. Each team has signed up for its own time slot, so be sure to keep track of time so you know when to go to the recording studio.

    [Slide 2] Record podcasts! Give students some guidance on what they should expect as they record their podcasts.

    Talking points:

    • Be ready by the recording space three minutes before your recording time.
    • Make sure each team member brings a copy of the podcast script.
    • While you wait for your turn, continue to practice your script.
    • (Optional) Add any other guidance on what students should expect as they record their podcasts.

    Teacher Tip: Using Audacity  

    To record the student podcasts, you will need a recording tool. Audacity is one free option you can use to easily record podcasts. Follow the links and guidance below, and make sure to explore your chosen tool before the lesson so you are ready to support students in their recording!

    Some best practices:
    • Select a quiet space for recording to ensure student voices are not obscured by other noises.
    • Allow students to record a 30-second practice session and play it back so they can reflect on their volume, speed, and tone.
    • If possible, connect headphones with a microphone to the computer where students are recording. You can also contact tech support for your school to see if they have a more advanced setup they could loan out. Either way, make sure to change the microphone input/output on Audacity.
    • Decide how you will edit these files. You might notice a couple of seconds of transition time when students switch between speakers, especially if they are using headphones. This is easy to edit in Audacity, and you can do it yourself before they are uploaded and shared in Lesson 3.4. However, this is also an opportunity to enable some of your more tech-savvy students to become “podcast producers.” They can help you edit the files as you supervise recording sessions, if you set them up to do so on another computer. They can even add background music!

    Teacher Tip: Sharing Podcasts

    Consider ahead of time how you will share the podcasts in Lesson 3.4. Work with your school’s administrator and technology coordinator to determine the best way to publish and share students’ podcasts. It might be as simple as emailing students an audio file, or as powerful as adding the podcasts to the school’s website so people outside of the school community can also learn from the students’ work.Two good options for sharing within a class include uploading the podcast recordings to a Google Classroom Assignment, or posting them on Flipgrid.To share out more broadly, podcasts can also be hosted on open platforms. From the New York Times’ Project audio lesson plan, here’s an example of how one teacher shares her class’s podcasts on SoundCloud.

    Step 2: Use flexible time(20 min)

    Purpose: Some student teams may need more time to record; others may be ready to move on to the editing stage, if they know how to use the technology. Students may also use this time to plan for the publishing event if needed.

    You might say: Now you have some flexible time to work. You may need more time to record your podcast. If your team has finished recording and you are satisfied with your podcast—congratulations! You can use the remaining time to begin editing your podcast, if you know how, or you can wait until the next lesson, when you will have more time to put the final touches on your podcast. You can also use this time to continue planning for our publishing event.

    [Slide 3] Provide guidance on what students can work on while others record. Explain that they may use this flexible time to:

    • Continue to finalize and practice their podcast, as they wait to record
    • Continue recording their podcast
    • Begin editing their podcast

    [Slide 4] (Optional) Student teams that are ready begin editing their podcast. Remind students to check the Podcast Rubric one last time to be sure they are meeting all criteria for an award-winning podcast. Offer students the following guidance and monitor teams, providing support as needed. Talking points:

    • Make sure your podcast is just the right length
    • Check volume levels
    • Cut unnecessary parts and errors
    • Smooth transitions
    • Reduce background noise
    • Add music and sound effects

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.

    Lesson 3.4: Community Discussion

    Teacher Guideicon

    Lesson 3.4: Community Discussion 

    Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences

     

    Unit Driving Question:

    What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity?

    Module Driving Question:

    How can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?

    Learning Targets

    I can:

    • Present my podcast to my classroom community. 
    • Give meaningful feedback to my peers on their podcasts.  
    • Reflect on the lessons I have learned about standing in solidarity with refugees.

    Purpose

    In this final lesson, you will reflect on your podcasting experience and what you’ve learned about standing in solidarity with displaced communities.

    Lesson Steps

    1. Reflect on podcast recordings: Listen to your own recording and the recordings made by other teams, and use the Podcast Reflection handout to record your thoughts.
    2. Participate in a community discussion: After reflecting on the podcasts you and your peers created, participate in a discussion about what you learned through this recording process.
    3. Reflect on unit driving question: Individually reflect on what the experiences of displaced people can teach us about community, resilience, and humanity. Finally, revisit the Know & Need to Know chart as a class.

    Teacher Preparation Notes

    Pacing
    Lesson Timing:60 minutes
    Standards
    • C3
    D2.Civ.1.6-8: Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens, political parties, interest groups, and the media in a variety of governmental and nongovernmental contexts.
    • CCSS
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4: Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
    Lesson Resources
    For StudentsFor EducatorsMaterials
    • Student podcasts (audio files)
    • Anchor chart
    • Sticky notes
    Lesson Overview
    In this final lesson, students reflect on their podcasting experience and what they’ve learned about standing in solidarity with displaced communities.
    Teacher Preparation
    • Step 1: Prepare podcast audio files. See the Teacher Tip from Lesson 3.3 about publishing podcasts, and ensure that students have access to their own and the other teams’ recordings.
    • Step 1: Determine which podcasts students will listen to. If you have uploaded all files to a class platform, students can listen to any two podcasts of their choosing. If you want to make sure all podcasts get equal attention, you can assign podcasts for each team to reflect on. Finally, decide how they will listen to these podcasts, depending on the technology available. For example: do you have enough headphones for each student to listen individually? If not, can you set students up in small groups, far enough apart that they can listen to podcasts in those groups? If not, choose a few podcasts to listen to as a class.
    • Step 3: Decide how to display unit reflections. This step suggests having students write down their reflections on sticky notes that you can display on an anchor chart, along with the unit driving question. However, you can use other platforms, like Google Jamboard, to record these reflections if you choose. Just make sure to decide on the structure beforehand.

    Lesson Steps in Detail

    Step 1: Reflect on podcast recordings(35 min)

    Purpose: Students listen to their own and their peers’ podcast recordings. They reflect on the stories and messages of each podcast.

    You might say: It’s time to celebrate and share all of the hard work we have done to create our podcasts. You will reflect on your own podcast and the podcasts created by your peers, and then we will have a community discussion on what we learned in this unit and through this process.

    [Slide 2] Invite students to complete their peer reflections.

    • Distribute copies of the Podcast Reflection handout.
    • Prompt students to begin by reflecting on the podcasts that their peers created. Provide directions on what podcasts they should listen to and how, and how much time they have for their peer reflections using the guidance provided in the Teacher Preparation section of this Teacher Guide.

    [Slide 3] Personal Podcast Reflection. Direct students to Part 2 of their Podcast Reflection handout and inform them that they will now reflect on their own podcast. Provide guidance on how much time they have for these personal reflections.

    Step 2: Participate in a community discussion(15 min)

    Purpose: Students engage in a whole-class discussion of the lessons they learned about supporting refugee communities through this unit and the podcast-recording process.

    You might say: Now that we have listened to some podcasts created by our class and reflected on these recordings individually, let’s open it up to a community discussion. We will start by sharing what we learned from the podcasts we listened to, and then we will talk about what we learned in this unit as a whole.

    [Slide 4] Invite students to participate in a community discussion. You can work through some or all of the following discussion questions together. Encourage students to reference notes from their Podcast Reflection handout as they reflect and respond.

    • What new information did you learn today through podcasts about refugee communities?
    • What surprised you as you were listening to podcasts today? What captured your attention?
    • Do you have any shoutouts you want to give to other teams about their podcasts?
    • Given our work, how can we use podcasting to stand in solidarity with displaced people?
    • What is the most important thing you would want someone to take away from your podcast, in terms of supporting refugee communities?
    Step 3: Reflect on unit driving question(10 min)

    Purpose: Students individually reflect on the unit driving question and display their reflections on a class anchor chart.

    You might say: We are going to close out this unit by reflecting on the question that has been guiding our learning throughout: What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity? You will reflect on this question individually on a sticky note. When you are done, you will post your sticky note on our class anchor chart, and then I will read some of our reflections aloud.

    [Slide 5] Display unit driving question. Distribute sticky notes and give students time to individually reflect on the question. Then, invite students to post their sticky notes on an anchor chart with the question written on it. Read some of the reflections aloud.

    [Slide 6] Invite students to return to their class Know & Need to Know chart, and make any final updates. Acknowledge that it’s okay if we still have unanswered questions about what we can do to stand in solidarity with displaced communities. There are so many organizations and communities working to support displaced people that we can look to for more information. These include:

    Teacher Tip: Managing Audience Questions & Feedback

    You may choose to invite parents and outside guests to this lesson, or share student podcasts with parents and outside guests.When students share their work at an event attended by parents, school staff, other students, outside experts, and/or community members, the audience may need support for asking good questions. Some people may not know what questions to ask, or may ask questions that are too challenging or complicated—or even inappropriate. For example, someone might ask students to comment on an aspect of history they did not study, or ask about a sensitive personal or political topic, or ask a question in a way that your students find difficult to understand or answer.If one of these questions arises, you can reframe it for students or ask the audience member to clarify it. For some questions, you may even have to say something like, “That’s a good question, but it’s not something we can answer,” or other words to that effect. Consider providing the audience with a handout with suggestions for the kinds of questions they might ask of students, such as, “What was the most important thing you learned?”, “What challenges did you face and how did you overcome them?”, and “Could you explain more about….?”Audience feedback is good for students to hear and can be a valuable part of your assessment strategy. However, guests may tend to offer only general praise, not specific feedback, and typically don’t want to sound too critical. Distribute one copy of the Podcast Rubric per team presenting to any outside guests, so they can orient to the project and use the rubric to provide feedback.

    Teacher Tip: Ways to Celebrate the Project

    Let your community or local media know about the project, and consider where else the podcasts might be made available to additional audiences, or how you could share the story of the project.In addition to a celebration that might have taken place with guests after the podcast publishing event, consider whether to celebrate as a class with just you and your students. Here are some ideas:

    • As a class, discuss “what we are proud of” or “our shining moments,” and make a list on chart paper.
    • Conduct an awards ceremony for the podcasts and hand out certificates. This should not be about which podcasts were the “best,” but more lighthearted and inclusive, and there can be more than one award given for each category. Students can help think of the categories, make nominations, and select who will receive the awards. Here are some examples:
    Most Unusual MusicCleverest Sound EffectsFuture NPR Podcast HostsTech Support WizardsMost Insightful IdeasCatchiest IntroductionsUnsung HeroesMost Challenging Problems Overcome
     

     

     

     

     

    Unless otherwise noted, Kể Chuyện: Vietnamese American Experiences © 2022 by Educurious is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0.