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Audio Slideshow: The World is No Long our Oyster
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Oyster-Acidifying oceans dramatically stunt the growth of already threatened shellfish. This audio slideshow and video features scientists from Bodega Marine Lab and research on shellfish in Tomales Bay, CA.

Subject:
Applied Science
Chemistry
Environmental Science
Oceanography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Author:
National Science Foundation
Date Added:
08/14/2012
The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe Undertakes Innovative Action to Reduce the Causes of Climate Change
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Educational Use
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The Blue Lake Rancheria Tribe—a federally recognized Native American tribe in California—was one of 16 communities selected as a 2015–2016 Climate Action Champion by the Obama Administration for exceptional work in response to climate change.

The Tribe began its strategic climate action planning in 2008 and has become a regional leader in greenhouse gas reductions and community resiliency measures. To date, the Tribe has reduced energy consumption from 2008 levels by 35 percent and has committed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2018, utilizing a range of approaches—including aggressive energy efficiency upgrades, developing on-site renewable energy (biomass, solar, fuel cells, grid battery storage), and switching to green fuels (electricity and biodiesel).

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
11/03/2016
Boomtimes Again: Twentieth-Century Mining in the Mojave Desert
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore twentieth-century mining in the Mojave Desert. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
04/11/2016
California Child Welfare Core Practice Model (CPM) Workforce Development Tools
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This resource features tools designed for child welfare leaders in California to use and adapt to meet the workforce development needs of their specific county or jurisdiction.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
05/16/2018
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom Lesson Plans
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This database of lessons is provided to support agriculture education in California classrooms. Over the last century, children have become further removed from the land that feeds and clothes us. And yet, Agriculture is the very basis of civilization—the food we eat, the clothing we wear, the material of our homes and many of our traditions and values…all coming from agriculture and collectively setting the pace for a nation's standard of living. The California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom works with K–12 teachers, and students to enhance education using agricultural examples.

Subject:
Agriculture
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom
Date Added:
02/16/2011
California Gold Rush
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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On January 24, 1848, carpenter James Marshall discovered gold at Sutter’s Mill, a sawmill on the American River in Coloma, California. This news quickly spread across the country and around the world, igniting the California Gold Rush. Between 1848 and 1855, 300,000 fortune-seekers came to California, transforming its population, landscape, and economy. The largest wave of migrants—about 90,000 people—arrived in 1849, earning them the nickname “forty-niners.”

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
03/05/2018
Chinese Exclusion Act
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Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Climate Change, Land Warming, and Wildfires
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Educational Use
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How does climate change lead to an increase in size, intensity, and frequency of wildfires in California? Students will use the phenomenon of wildfire intensity increasing in California to explore the causes, effects and solutions to climate change in California.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
U.C. San Diego
Provider Set:
Climate Champions
Author:
Cindy Jenson-Elliot
Tina Tom
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Collaboration Supports OER at Fallbrook Union Elementary School District
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The Fallbrook Union Elementary School District, located in north San Diego County, serves approximately 5,200 kindergarten through eighth grade students in eight schools. The geographical boundaries of FUESD contribute to the unique population it serves. Stretching from the I-15 corridor to the Pacific coast, and encompassing over 110,000 acres of Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, FUESD serves a uniquely diverse population of students who represent military-connected families, English-language learners, students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, as well as students from more affluent families.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Office of Educational Technology
Author:
Office of Educational Technology
Date Added:
09/23/2021
Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC) Resources
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This resource provides access to publications, reports and videos related to Commercially Sexually Exploited Children (CSEC) in child welfare, with particular emphasis on the role of California's child welfare agencies in supporting safety and stability for children and families impacted by commercial sexual exploitation.

Subject:
Social Science
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Competing Visions: A History of California
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This is a college-level history of California that covers (in thirteen chapters) the state's history prior to Spanish colonization and up through the present day. Three major themes provide a unifying thread for the narrative: demographic and cultural diversity, California's relationship to the nation and world, and competing visions of the "California Dream," including contestations over the allocation of cultural, economic, and political power. The text is richly illustrated with maps, charts, photographs, and art.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo
Richard Griswold del Castillo
Robert W. Cherny
Date Added:
10/26/2021
Continuous Quality Improvement in Child Welfare Learning Collaborative 2015
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This resource provides access to various materials used throughout the Northern California Training Academy's Child Welfare CQI Collaborative Conference, which was held in February, 2015. To learn more about the Academy and the the courses it offers, visit humanservices.ucdavis.edu/academy.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Education
Social Science
Material Type:
Data Set
Date Added:
11/29/2018
Conversations with History: Democracy, Disarmament and Public Education with Alan Cranston
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Alan Cranston was a four term Senator from California and president and founder of the Global Security Institute and director of its nuclear weapons elimination initiative. This discussion on democracy, disarmament and public education with UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler was taped in April 2000. (53 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/13/2005
Core 2.5: Child Maltreatment Identification, Part 1
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This training provides participants with the skills to recognize factors that will assist them in accurately identifying neglect, emotional abuse and physical abuse as defined by California law.

After attending this training, participants will be able to: Identify factors that constitute abuse and/or neglect as defined by the Welfare & Institutions Code Section 300 (a) - (j) and recognize parenting behaviors that promote child safety and family well-being outcomes; distinguish scenarios of child maltreatment from those that are not child maltreatment based on a constellation of factors such as physical injuries and behavioral indicators, within a cultural context; and value the importance of diversity as it relates to child maltreatment.

Successful participants will be better equipped to recognize conditions contributing to child maltreatment as well as common injuries bringing children to the attention of child welfare.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Date Added:
01/03/2017
Coronado Unified School District’s #GoOpen Movement to Support Learner-Centric Teaching
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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CUSD was motivated to #GoOpen because the learner has changed. “Students have a pervasive mindset of personalization. Personalization of clothing, communication devices, and food has become expected in the marketplace…so why not in our schools?” acknowledged Superintendent Dr. Jeffrey Felix. Students today demand to have their instruction personalized, made to order, just the way they like it.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
Office of Educational Technology
Author:
Office of Educational Technology
Date Added:
09/23/2021
Early History of the California Coast
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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is a travel itinerary that highlights 45 historic places that help tell the story of Spanish colonization of California. Learn about forts, churches, adobe houses, historic districts, and other places. Find out about the Presidio, which was established in 1769 as the base for Spain's colonization efforts and was the first permanent European settlement on the Pacific Coast.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
07/27/2007