Updating search results...

Search Resources

41 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • plagiarism
Academic Integrity
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

An interactive approach to conveying the values of academic integrity, clarifying the meaning of plagiarism, and introducing the basics of citations, quoting and paraphrasing.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Regina
Author:
Ulrike Kestler
Date Added:
07/01/2021
All About APA Handout PDF
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides detailed information on how to cite and write in APA style. Writers will learn how to organize their work and develop in-text and formal reference lists according to APA.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Auburn University
Date Added:
10/06/2022
Avoiding Plagiarism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

We know you have come to this tutorial because you are a serious writer who wants to write well — and correctly! You have probably heard the word plagiarism and would like to understand it better. You have come to the right place. In this tutorial, you’ll learn:

What plagiarism is
How to recognize seven different kinds of plagiarism
The correct way to use ‘open access’ materials
The consequences of plagiarism
How to avoid plagiarism by doing the following:
Citing sources correctly
Recognizing ‘common knowledge’
Writing good paraphrases
Writing good summaries
Taking careful notes

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Excelsior University
Provider Set:
Excelsior University Online Writing Lab
Date Added:
11/06/2018
Avoiding Plagiarism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

PowerPoint presentation on avoidance of plagiarism and associated tools. This resource should be accessible and includes captioning, as well as narration transcript within notes. Conversion to MP4 format can be found with the following link: https://1drv.ms/v/s!Au0Iieak3rI_0FzvLimwqLC6KUxo?e=Np6bCL.

Subject:
Applied Science
Education
Higher Education
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Lynda M. Redden
Date Added:
07/12/2021
Avoiding Plagiarism Tutorial
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Plagiarism is presenting someone else's work as your own. It can include copying and pasting text from a website into a project that you're working on, or taking an idea from a book without including a citation to give credit to the book's author. Plagiarism is very common, and the internet has made it even more common. However, if you are careful to cite your sources, it's not too hard to avoid plagiarism.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Provider:
Goodwill Community Foundation, Inc.
Provider Set:
GCFLearnFree
Date Added:
07/19/2013
Biology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, The Science of Biology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the shared characteristics of the natural sciencesSummarize the steps of the scientific methodCompare inductive reasoning with deductive reasoningDescribe the goals of basic science and applied science

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Tina B. Jones
Date Added:
08/17/2019
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, The Science of Biology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the shared characteristics of the natural sciencesSummarize the steps of the scientific methodCompare inductive reasoning with deductive reasoningDescribe the goals of basic science and applied science

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Classroom Policy on Plagiarism
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This will set a standard for student's academic integrity and dishonesty in  submitting their papers and/or presentations.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Student Guide
Author:
Charo Chio
Date Added:
10/01/2020
Common Sense Education - Let's Give Credit (Plagiarism and Citations)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

With so much information at our fingertips, students learn what it means to "give credit" when using content they find online. Taking on the role of a detective, students learn why it's important to give credit and the right ways to do it when they use words, images, or ideas that belong to others.

In this introduction to plagiarism and good digital citizenship, second graders are encouraged to give credit to people whose work they reference when doing projects.

Although written for second grade, this lesson could be easily adapted to upper primary and even middle school levels.

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Common Sense Media
Date Added:
03/05/2021
Deterring Plagiarism Handout PDF
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This handout introduces the idea of plagiarism and its various types. Further, it recommends strategies to faculty on how plagiarism can be avoided by using techniques such as timely peer review, feedback, and effective paraphrasing.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Auburn University
Date Added:
10/06/2022
Encouraging Academic Integrity Through a Preventative Framework
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
Rating
0.0 stars

The discourse around academic integrity has become more prolific and robust, and the nature of, as well as what constitutes academic misconduct has expanded and continues to evolve as the landscape of education and technology changes. Current examples of misconduct behaviours include but are not limited to: copying answers during an assessment, claiming another person’s work as one’s own, unauthorized collaboration, having another person complete an assessment, unauthorized use of online platforms to complete an assessment, purchasing a completed assessment, and falsifying results from experiments.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
British Columbia/Yukon Open Authoring Platform
Author:
Daryl Smith
Jessica Kalra
Maggie Ross
Ragad Anwar
Vicki Vogel
Date Added:
06/15/2021
Get the Word Out at McDonalds!
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students take part in a hypothetical scenario that challenges them to inform customers at a local restaurant of how their use and disposal of plastics relates/contributes to the Great Pacific garbage patch (GPGP). What students ultimately do is research information on the plastics pollution in the oceans and present that information as a short, eye-catching newsletter suitable to hand out to restaurant customers. This activity focuses on teaching students to conduct their own research on a science-technology related topic and present it in a compelling manner that includes citing source information without plagiarism. By doing this, students gain experience and skills with general online searching as well as word processing and written and visual communication.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Andrey Koptelov
Nathan Howell
Date Added:
10/14/2015
How to Avoid All Possible Types of Plagiarism in Writing
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Plagiarism definitions are many:When it comes to spoken words, plagiarism means stealing ideas and thoughts of other people to claim them as one's own. Speaking of written words, plagiarism is defined as a lack of original content in a writing piece.Dictionaries call plagiarism "stealing and passing off ideas or words of another as one's own," and "presenting as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source." (Merriam-Webster)Plagiarism is a persistent problem. People do it unknowingly or willingly, and a large percentage of accusations corresponds to the academic world: students plagiarize writings for many reasons, use all possible types of this offensive act, and don't realize all the consequences. What they should try to do is be aware of plagiarism and avoid it in academic writings, citing and referencing their works accordingly.What are plagiarism types?The digital era calls the shots, so today we have many new forms of plagiarism, both intentional and unintentional ones. Academic and journalistic are the general names for plagiarism types, but both involve several variations. They are as follows:Full plagiarismAlso known as "direct" or "complete" plagiarism, this form appears when you copy the content from a source as it is, word for word.Characteristics: no original research, no changes in lexical items or punctuation, no differences (even the tiniest ones) between two content pieces.Full plagiarism is the sin of incompetent authors or those who are mere lazy to give it their best shot and create something original. Speaking of the academic world, full plagiarism leads to a student's expulsion.ParaphrasingSome call it "partial" plagiarism because it happens when a writer takes data from several different sources, combines them with minor changes in language, and represent as original ideas. Paraphrasing itself is not plagiarism, and it's okay to use it if citing and referencing all sources. But it becomes so when represented as a rewrite of the original with no attributions.Characteristics: presenting the ideas from original sources in different forms, changes of sentence structure, active to passive voice manipulations, no cites or references.In the case of paraphrasing, an author takes pains to sound original and yet doesn't provide any first-hand research in his writing. In academia, this form of plagiarism signals about a lack of knowledge on the topic or not enough writing skills to expand ideas.Minimalistic plagiarismIt's a kind of paraphrase too, but a more professional one: a writer copies ideas but changes the flow and order in which they are presented in the source. This form of plagiarism is difficult to detect because it does seem original, especially if checked with plagiarism detection software.Characteristics: changes in sentence structure, statements order, and writing style of the source; paraphrasing several sources in one text with no attributions; active use of synonyms.Minimalistic plagiarism happens when a student lacks time or patience to create original work but is ambitious of recognition and high grades.Mosaic plagiarismAlso known as a poor rewrite, synonymization, or patch writing, mosaic plagiarism happens when an author takes phrases from the original, rearranges them in order, and represent in own work without citing. Or, when he keeps the same sentence structure and meaning but replace every word with synonyms so his work would look like a newly written one.Characteristics: rearrangements in word and phrase order, excessive synonymization, a flow changes, no attribution to sources.Students do love this type of plagiarism, and it's most common in their academic works. Mosaic plagiarism signals about procrastination, lack of knowledge, and ignorance of plagiarism consequences.Accidental plagiarismIn plain English, it's unintentional copying of others' ideas and words. Speaking of students, they might fall into a trap of accidental plagiarism when don't know they borrow concepts from others and, therefore, neglect to reference sources because they do consider their writings original.Despite its accidental nature, this form of plagiarism is considered as copyright infringement and scholar ethics violation. So, the consequences are going to be as ominous as in the case of other plagiarism types.Self-plagiarismThe trickiest one, self-plagiarism occurs when a student decides to submit his previous work to another class. Or, when he takes ideas, concepts, and passages from his other essays and use them for new assignments with no permission from both professors.This form is the most controversial one, and many still argue if they should consider it plagiarism at all. On the one hand, your work is your intellectual property, and so you can use it wherever you want. On the other, this work is no longer original after you've submitted it. It's a kind of bluff: the audience waits for new information from an author, but he misleads them and gives something they've heard already.In the world of academia, it would be wise for students to consult professors on the institution's policies to make sure it's okay to cite papers, previously submitted to other classes.Source plagiarism, or wrong referencingAuthors refer to each other in their works. And when a student refers to a cited source rather than a primary one, it's called source plagiarism.Source formatting matters, either. Improperly cited sources, false referencing, or no references at all are the cases of plagiarism. Reasons for why a student avoids references in a paper vary:He asked a ghostwriter to create an essay, so he just can't refer to it.He used a source to steal arguments and just copied them with no changes.He used the essence of a source and just changed several keywords.He combined several sources in a paper for it to look original.It often happens that a student doesn't know how to use citations and references in his copy. It's not the case of plagiarism, but a professor may consider it so when detecting some misinformation in a list of references. This includes:Using wrong sources (see the above source plagiarism).Neglecting footnotes: a student cites an author but doesn't provide a location of the source.Using fake sources: a student plagiarizes the entire text of his essay and yet provides a long list of references to "prove" its original nature.Proper citation is a must in the academic world, so writers need to know how to use and structure references to avoid accusations of plagiarism. How to avoid plagiarism issues in writings?Plagiarism consequences are many, and most are not as evident as students might think. Copyright infringement and intellectual property theft are legal issues, and they might lead to far stronger effects than poor grades or reputation loss. To avoid them, stop believing all myths about plagiarism in academia and start doing in-depth research on assigned topics. It will allow understanding key concepts and structure a future essay right.Other tips on avoiding plagiarism in writing:Document every source you use. Make sure to format it right: don't forget about quotation marks when citing someone's words.Spare no time on research.When in doubts, ask peers to check your list of references and say if you format it right. The same goes for research: friends might help to find proper sources or recommend some.Never ask anyone to write essays for you: any ghostwriters, any custom services, any downloads from the web.PRO tip: after you completed writing a paper, run it through a pro commercial software that will find unintentional plagiarism in your text.Plagiarism is about ethics and principles. It's not enough to know the definition and consequences of the issue to avoid it. What matters is your determination: stay honest, do research, create original works for more people to learn new ideas, refer to other authors, and remember to mention their names when citing.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Nancy Christinovich
Date Added:
03/26/2018
Instructor Module | Ducks Have Integrity: Academic Conduct at UO
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This module is designed to support instructors in creating a culture of academic integrity in their courses at the University of Oregon. Students learn best when we develop a shared understanding of what academic integrity is, how to support it, and what university resources we can draw on together. Instructors are encouraged to import and adapt the module to suit their teaching needs, including adding disciplinary customizations.

Please use the following attribution when using this work:

"Ducks Have Integrity: Academic Conduct at UO" by UO Libraries, TEP, and UO Online is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0"

Subject:
Education
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Laurel Bastian
Rayne Vieger
Teaching Engagement Program
UO Libraries
UO Online
Veronica Vold
Bronwen Maxson
Date Added:
10/22/2021
Introduction to Research course (LS 101)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This 2-credit course provides an introduction to research by learning to identify, find, evaluate, incorporate, and cite appropriate sources using a range of research tools. This course is designed for an online class environment and was taught as such in Spring 2020. The course materials have been collaboratively developed by Tacoma Community College librarians, and uses a combination of openly licensed, open access, and library resources.

Subject:
Education
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Tacoma Community College Library
Date Added:
08/06/2020
New Student Orientation Module | Ducks Have Academic Integrity: Academic Conduct at UO
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This module, Ducks Have Integrity: Academic Conduct at UO, is a part of IntroDUCKtion for all incoming first-years and transfer students at the University of Oregon. Module content is based on current research around why students engage in academic misconduct and what strategies have effectively increased academic integrity (we were particularly informed by The Handbook for Academic Integrity, edited by Tracy Bretag).

The module was developed in collaboration between UO Libraries, the Teaching Engagement Program, and UO Online, and in consultation with Student Conduct and Community Standards. We are grateful to the instructors who shared their experiences and challenges, as this informed the design, and those students who gave feedback, as that feedback was invaluable.

This module was not designed for use in individual classes at the University of Oregon, but rather for all students to go through as part of their new student experience. Response from students so far on the module has been overwhelmingly positive (we sought anonymous feedback from participants), and student reflections about why academic integrity matters and how they can plan for it are insightful and heartening. We encourage other institutions to adapt the module for similar new student experiences.

Please include the following attribution statement in all adaptations:

"Ducks Have Integrity: Academic Conduct at UO" by UO Libraries, TEP, and UO Online is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 | This work is a derivative of Exploring Academic Integrity in Your Research by UO Libraries, and Academic Integrity by Ulrike Kestler

Subject:
Education
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ali Selman
Bailey Dobbs
Bronwen Maxson
Laurel Bastian
Teaching Engagement Program
UO Libraries
UO Online
Veronica Vold
Rayne Vieger
Date Added:
10/22/2021