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Assessing Climate Risks in a National Estuary
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Public Domain
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Stakeholders of the Morro Bay National Estuary Program in California worked with resources from the EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries program to identify their climate risks. Their results helped them prioritize actions for building resilience.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
09/20/2016
Bending the Curve: Mitigating Climate Change
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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The goal of this unit is for students to gain an awareness of several potential ways to mitigate climate change. Many climate solutions exist, are in use, and can be expanded in scale. Students will examine solutions from Bending the Curve, explore carbon sequestration by trees, coastal wetland restoration, and food waste reduction in more detail. They will propose three (3) realistic solutions that could happen at an individual, school, or community scale that would assist in mitigating climate change.

Subject:
Applied Science
Atmospheric Science
Environmental Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
U.C. San Diego
Provider Set:
Climate Champions
Date Added:
04/27/2022
Carnivorous Plants of Cartwheel Bay
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Educational Use
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In this video segment from NatureScene, explore Cartwheel Bay, a wetland in South Carolina, and learn about the variety of carnivorous plants native to this unique landform.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
SCETV
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Date Added:
08/20/2008
Environmental Applications of GIS
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Increasingly volatile climate and weather; vulnerable drinking water supplies; shrinking wildlife habitats; widespread deforestation due to energy and food production. These are examples of environmental challenges that are of critical importance in our world, both in far away places and close to home, and are particularly well suited to inquiry using geographic information systems. In GEOG 487 you will explore topics like these and learn about data and spatial analysis techniques commonly employed in environmental applications. After taking this course you will be equipped with relevant analytical approaches and tools that you can readily apply to your own environmental contexts.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Information Science
Physical Geography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Rachel Kornak
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Evaluating the Health of an Urban Wetland Using Electrical Resistivity
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This module introduces students to the fundamental principles and uses of electrical resistivity, with a focus on an environmental application. Students explore the characteristics and environmental setting of Harrier Meadow, a saltmarsh just outside of New York City. They investigate the relationship between electrical resistivity and physical properties of the soil in the marsh. Students also discover how variations in survey configuration parameters control investigation depth (how far into the ground the signals sense) and spatial resolution (what size objects can be detected). Finally, students learn about and then perform geophysical inversion, which is the process of estimating the geophysical properties of the subsurface from geophysical observations. In the final unit of the module, students evaluate the extent to which the geophysical dataset and direct physical measurements support the hypothesis, introduced in Unit 1, accounting for the distribution of Pickleweed in Harrier Meadow.
This module is intended to require approximately 2-3 weeks of class time. Teaching material includes PowerPoints that may be used in lectures or provided for self-guided learning, exercises, and handouts that ask students to synthesize what they learn from the exercises. In addition, multiple choice and short answer questions can be given to students as homework, on quizzes, or on exams.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Chemistry
Environmental Studies
Hydrology
Mathematics
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Evaluating the Health of an Urban Wetland Using Electrical Resistivity Lee Slater, Rutgers University - Newark [end rawhtml]
Date Added:
09/27/2022
Geography of Water Resources
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Geography 431 is designed to further understanding of the natural processes of aquatic ecosystems, management of water resources, and threats to sustaining water quantity. Develop awareness and appreciation of the perspectives about water as a precious resource, commodity, and sometimes hazard. Learn how and why water is distributed unevenly around the Earth. Examine how resource management decisions are strongly related to water availability, quantity, and quality. The course examines water resources management; dams and dam removal; provision of safe potable water; threats to water quantity and quality; land use changes; the water economy; water laws and policy; institutions for water management at the global, national, regional, and local scale; and issues of water security and climate change.

Subject:
Applied Science
Ecology
Environmental Science
Hydrology
Life Science
Physical Geography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Jamie Peeler
Michael Nassry
Rob Brooks
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Geology of the National Parks
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Geysers and grizzlies and glaciers, oh my. The national parks may be America's best idea, saving the finest parts of the nation for everyone to enjoy forever. What better way to learn about the natural world than to tour the parks with us? We'll explore how the mountains and valleys formed and why they often come with volcanoes and earthquakes. You'll see what really killed the dinosaurs and how we can help save their modern relatives in the parks. With film clips, slide shows, and our geological interpretations of classic rock songs, isn't it time for a road trip?

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Ecology
Environmental Science
Geology
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Richard Alley
Sridhar Anandakrishnan
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Investigating Neighborhood Wetlands
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This activity is field investigation where students map a neighborhood wetland and generate various watershed questions. Students identify engineered structures in or around this wetland and consider how flood water can be controlled.

Subject:
Ecology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Tim Shulstad
Date Added:
08/16/2012
Investigating the Long Meadow Lake Unit of the MN Valley National Wildlife Refuge to Determine if the Bass Ponds Trailhead Wetlands is a Stable Ecosystem
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this investigation, students gather biotic and abiotic data and samples in the field, develop an experiment to test another abiotic factor in the lab, synthesize group data, interpret their findings and make a claim on the health of the wetland ecosystem.

Subject:
Ecology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Stephanie Jones
Date Added:
08/10/2012
Join a Stream Team
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Activities offer students the opportunity to learn about multiple facets of waterbodies and pollution, including aquatic life (indicator species), local concerns, and public outreach through research, teamwork, and role-playing exercises.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Date Added:
02/16/2011
PEI SOLS 2nd grade Wetland: Habitats
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CC BY
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The goal of the second grade Wetland: Habitat storyline is to introduce students to wetlands and the living things that call them home. In this storyline students develop an understanding of what a habitat is, different types of habitats, what living animals and plants can be found in a wetland, and what plants need to grow

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
PEI SOLS 5th grade Wetland: Ecosystem Benefits
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CC BY
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The goal of the fifth grade Wetland: Ecosystem Benefits storyline is to build on students’ previous knowledge of plant/animal needs, habitats, and protection of Earth’s resources. In this storyline students develop an understanding of wetland ecosystems, photosynthesis, what plants need to grow/gain mass and blue carbon wetlands.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
PEI SOLS Middle School Wetlands: Ecosystem Services
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CC BY
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Coastal wetlands bring many benefits to ecosystems including their ability to sequester carbon and mitigate fluctuations in sea levels. Students will understand the ecosystem benefits of coastal wetlands with a focus on the potential of estuaries for climate related planning.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
Saving Tidal Marshes in the San Francisco Bay
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As sea level rises, wetlands and marshes must move inland, or drown. The Sonoma Land Trust is using innovative strategies to restore and enhance marshlands and the ecosystems they support.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Provider Set:
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Date Added:
08/09/2016
Understanding the methane-producing potential of two recently discovered groups of microbe
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Mangrove forests are home to many varieties of methanogens, microbes that digest surrounding carbon into methane under low-oxygen conditions. Despite their important role in the global carbon cycle and climate change, the metabolic potentials of two novel methanogens in mangroves remain poorly understood. A new study reports on the ecological importance of Methanofastidiosa (MF) and Methanomassiliicoccales (MMA), two recently discovered groups of methanogens found to dwell naturally in the Mangrove Nature Reserve in Shenzhen, China. Using metagenomics, researchers examined how MF and MMA produce methane. Results showed that the two groups of microbes both use hydrogen to produce methane from compounds found naturally in mangrove sediments, including methylsulfides, methanol, and methylamines. This marks the first time the two groups of methanogens have been studied in the wild and could help scientists understand how these microbes contribute to global methane emissions and a changing climate..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
11/03/2020
Unit 1: Exploring Harrier Meadow, an Urban Wetland System
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Students will conduct a virtual exploration of Harrier Meadow, a saltmarsh in the New Jersey Meadowlands. They will identify its vulnerability to pollution, its tidal connection to the Hackensack Estuary and the Atlantic Ocean along with its proximity to New York City. Vegetation patterns within this wetland will be explored, focusing on a salinity tolerant native plant (Pickleweed) that is returning to the marsh. The return of such native species is critically important to wetland restoration efforts that aim to reclaim native habitat following decades of environmental degradation since the industrial revolution. These vegetation patterns are the focus of resistivity and electromagnetic surveys that the students explore in the subsequent units of this module. The geophysical surveys aim to better understand the underlying factors controlling the distribution of Pickleweed. By understanding where the Pickleweed is thriving, restoration efforts could subsequently be improved by locating regions of such wetlands with similar underlying factors where Pickleweed (and other native plants) could be successfully reintroduced. In the first unit of this module, students will use Google Earth (on the web), high-resolution video acquired from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and an ArcGIS Storymap in their exploration. Primary outcome: students comprehend the association between salinity and Pickleweed and formulate plans to test a hypothesis for Pickleweed persistence/patterning in Harrier Meadow that will ultimately be implemented using near surface geophysical methods in the remaining units of the module.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Biology
Career and Technical Education
Environmental Studies
Hydrology
Life Science
Mathematics
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Compiled by Lee Slater, Rutgers University Newark (lslater@newark.rutgers.edu)
Date Added:
09/03/2022
Unit 2: Geophysical Properties of the Subsurface
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Electrical measurement of unconsolidated soils in the laboratory.

Provenance: Lee Slater, Rutgers University-Newark
Reuse: This item is in the public domain and maybe reused freely without restriction.
Archie (1950) defined the term petrophysics to describe the study of the physics of rocks, particularly with respect to the fluids they contain. Although originally focused on geophysical exploration, petrophysics concepts are now used to interpret near surface geophysics measurements made to address environmental and engineering problems. This unit investigates relationships between these geophysical measurements and the physical and chemical properties of soils and sediments in the Earth's near subsurface. The specific focus is on the electrical properties of soils and how they are related to the ionic concentration of the pore fluids, the water content, porosity and grain size. Field results from a geophysical survey performed in Kearny Marsh, close to Harrier Meadow, are included to illustrate how electrical conductivity of a soil measured with an electromagnetic sensor is a good proxy for pore fluid ionic concentration, in this case related to contamination from a bordering landfill.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Chemistry
Environmental Studies
Hydrology
Mathematics
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Compiled by Lee Slater, Rutgers University Newark (lslater@newark.rutgers.edu)
Date Added:
09/03/2022
Unit 3: Field Geophysical Measurements
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Near surface geophysical measurements are performed by moving sensors across the Earth's surface. Active geophysical sensors transmit a signal into the Earth and record a returned signal that contains information on the physical and chemical properties of the Earth (see Unit 2). This unit introduces the student to the basics of geophysical data acquisition using two techniques that record variations in the electrical conductivity (see Unit 2) of the Earth: [1] electrical imaging (EI), and [2] electromagnetic (EM) conductivity mapping.











Basic concept of electrical imaging measurements

Provenance: Lee Slater, Rutgers University-Newark
Reuse: This item is in the public domain and maybe reused freely without restriction.
Electrical imaging is a galvanic geophysical approach whereby electrical contact with the Earth is made directly via electrodes (typically metal stakes) that are inserted into the ground. Electromagnetic conductivity mapping is a non-contact approach whereby the physics of EM induction is used to sense changes in electrical conductivity. The advantages and disadvantages of using galvanic (EI) and non-contact (EM) techniques for measuring electrical conductivity are described. Ohm's Law is introduced and students investigate how electrical resistance measurements are related to the electrical conductivity of soils. Field implementation of both EI and EM techniques is demonstrated using surveys performed in Harrier Meadow as an example. Students investigate how variations in survey configuration parameters (e.g. electrode configuration and electrode spacing in EI, frequency and coil spacing in EM) control investigation depth (how far into the ground the signals sense) and spatial resolution (what size objects can be detected). The concept of pre-modeling a geophysical survey (i.e. running some simulations of likely effectiveness of the methods before going to the field) to evaluate expected investigation depth and sensitivity is introduced. The Excel-based Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity (SEER) tool provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) is used to demonstrate some key concepts.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Chemistry
Environmental Studies
Hydrology
Mathematics
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Compiled by Lee Slater, Rutgers University Newark (lslater@newark.rutgers.edu)
Date Added:
09/03/2022
Unit 4: The Magic of Geophysical Inversion
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The concepts of forward modeling and inverse modeling

Provenance: Lee Slater, Rutgers University-Newark
Reuse: If you wish to use this item outside this site in ways that exceed fair use (see http://fairuse.stanford.edu/) you must seek permission from its creator.
This unit introduces the student to the concept of geophysical inversion, which is the process of estimating the geophysical properties of the subsurface from the geophysical observations. The basic mechanics of the inversion process used to estimate spatial variations in electrical conductivity from electrical imaging (EI) datasets are introduced in a way that avoids the heavy mathematics. The challenges of inverting two dimensional geophysical datasets and the strategies for limiting the inversion to geologically reasonable solutions are described. The unfortunate characteristics of geophysical images (blurriness, imaging artifacts) are explained to highlight the limitations of inversion and to emphasize that the inverted images never match with geological reality. Students use the Excel-based Scenario Evaluator for Electrical Resistivity (SEER) tool introduced in Unit 3, Field Geophysical Measurements, to investigate key inversion concepts associated with measurement errors and the benefits of adding boreholes to surface data using synthetic datasets. Students are then led through an inversion of the two-dimensional EI dataset acquired in Harrier Meadow using ResIPy, a Python-based graphical user interface developed for instructional use. Following the instructional video, students then perform the inversion in ResIPy themselves and explore how variations in inversion settings related to the errors in the measurements result in distinctly different images.

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Chemistry
Environmental Studies
Hydrology
Mathematics
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Compiled by Lee Slater, Rutgers University Newark (lslater@newark.rutgers.edu)
Date Added:
09/03/2022