Author:
Raeanna Carlson
Subject:
Literature, Educational Technology, Composition and Rhetoric, Reading Literature, Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson, Module
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11
Tags:
  • Discussion
  • Note-taking
  • Of Mice and Men
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    Of Mice and Men End of the Novel Project

    Of Mice and Men End of the Novel Project

    Overview

    Activity Description: This activity is actually four different discussion-based activities to be used in a station rotation discussion day format.  It does require some prework with the double journal note-taking graphic organizer included in the resources.  

    Time needed for activity: 45-60 minutes

    Resources needed for activity: student notes using the double journal note-taking graphic organizer; paper, sticky notes, and markers for timelines, and internet access to LMS. 

    Assessment:  Rubrics 

     

     

    "Of Mice and Men End of the Novel Project" by Raeanna Carlson is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0 / A derivative from the original work

    Pre-Discussion Notes

    Prior to the discussion day, have students fill out the double journal note chart attached to the student resources.  This double journal note-taking graphic organizer asks students to record textual evidence in the first column.  Students are also prompted to “Write down a short summary of or the direct quotation from the part of the text…” in order to get the evidence out of the text.  The organizer also reminds them to “Try to include page numbers...” in order to make finding evidence during discussion easier.  In the second column, students are prompted to explain their thoughts.  They should think about how or why something mattered to them or the text and the effect it could have on the rest of the novel. This is the most important part of the activity since this is the part where students have to think metacognitively.  They have to think beyond the straightforward and consider all the ramifications and implications of what they have just read. Essentially, they have to decompress all of their thoughts and consider why they had them and what it all means. They have to look at the big picture.

    Taking notes ... I know, not the most fun, but this is a necessary part of the learning process. 

    Photo credit: Pitsch, https://docs.google.com/document/d/1g1Bp0wo0akHJwrV8V5HNknFqWopaqd2ZfldHmxYpLV0/edit?usp=sharing
    Photo credit: https://pixabay.com/photo-2437110/

    Use the double journal linked below to record both your textual evidence (notes of quotations or paraphrases of events from Of Mice and Men ) and your reaction to that evidence.  You will need ALL of these notes to accomplish the various activities on discussion day!

    Of Mice and Men Double Journal Notes

    Connections

    Students will:

    1. Post one connection they had or made to the text.  This could be a text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connection.
    2. They will need textual evidence.
    3. Respond to at least one (1) other post with an explanation of how the first student's connection could change the way we think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.

    Go to the discussion board labeled "Connections" and complete the following tasks:

      1. Post one connection you had or made to the text. This could be a text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connection.
      2. Respond to at least one (1) other post with an explanation of how your classmate's connection could change the way we think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.
      3. See the attached rubric for how your online discussion post will be assessed.

      For BOTH posts, you need to cite specific textual evidence (a.k.a quotations or at least page numbers of conversations).  You also need to give more than the generic "I agree!/No way!" response.  Be thoughtful!

      Post-it notes
      Photo credit: Alexandra Koch, https://pixabay.com/photo-1975188/

       

      Concerns

      Students will:

      1. Post one concerns they had or made to the text.  
      2. They will need textual evidence. 
      3. Respond to at least one (1) other post with an explanation of how the first student's connection could change the way we think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.

      Go to the discussion board labeled "Concerns" and complete the following tasks:

      1. Write a discussion post about the "red flag" moments you had while reading. 
      2. Use your note sheet to help you write your discussion post.  
      3. Reference specific textual evidence by quoting directly from the text. 
      4. Explain how that concern could change the way you think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.
      5. Reply to at least one (1) classmate
      6. See the attached rubric for how your post will be assessed.
      Book club
      Photo Credit: Junder Cheng, https://pixabay.com/photo-753891/

       

      Concepts & Craft

      On discussion day, one station will be a collaborative workstation.  Students will work together to create a timeline of important events and conversations within each chapter or chapter grouping.  Students may do this "old school" by hand on butcher paper or extra large sticky notes, online via https://time.graphics/ or another online timeline maker.

      Students will:

      1. Outline/summarize 5-10 important events or conversations that happen within the chapter.
      2. Attribute important examples of craft (figurative language, mood, irony, symbolism, etc) to the event or conversation they describe or impact.

      As a group,

      1. Create a timeline with 5-10 important events or conversations that happen within the chapter.  Be sure to include page numbers for easier reference!
      2. After establishing your baseline of events and conversations, find examples of craft (figurative language, mood, imagery, symbolism, irony, etc) that describe or impact those events or conversations.
      3. In a different color or direction, add quotations that demonstrate those craft items to the timeline.
      4. See the attached rubric for how you will be assessed.
      Timeline
      Photo Credit: Luigi Mengato, https://flic.kr/p/gVUd2Z

       

      Group Discussion Project

      NOTES FOR THE DISCUSSION

      • Review discussion expectations 
      • Review the rubric in detail the day before
      • Monitor the discussion
      • Assign the students their roles
      • Vet the submitted questions for repeated or inappropriate material

      Please review the following questions in preparation for the group discussion:

      1. Why would some people say Lenny best represents innocence and George best represents morality? What evidence can you pull from the text to support your answer? 

      2. What would you do if you were the deciding factor regarding who lives and who dies? How would you make your decision? 

      3. How would a situation similar to George killing Lenny be received by the current climate in American society? What has changed from the 1930s to today to explain the reception of the murder? 

      4. Identify a metaphor in the novel and explain its impact on the plot progression and character development. 

      5. Who has the authority to decide what is considered right and what is considered wrong?

      Group discussion icon

      Photo Credit: Ricinator, pixabay.com  

      Students are to submit a minimum of one (1) quesiton (not listed above) to the teacher to add to the pool of questions for group discussion the day before the discussion.

      Each person in the group will have a specific role in addition to discussing with peers. 

      • Questioner: this person is in charge of the questions. They are to ask the questions and clarify the questions when necessary. 
      • Notetaker: this person is to document what is said in the discussion. They are to write as much as possible. 
      • Summarizer: this person is to use the notetaker's document to create a full summary of the discussion. They are to ask for clarification from group members. 
      • Presenter: this person is to present the summarizer's document to the rest of the class to show the findings of the group. 

      ***Rubric***