All resources in Oregon Arts

Stories with Physical Expression with Jaece | Arts, Care & Connection

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About the Arts, Care & Connection Lesson Pilot Series:Arts for Learning Northwest collaborated with Oregon teaching artists on the development of this series of four arts courses designed for K-5 students, with integrated social emotional learning content in the areas of dance, visual arts, theater, and music. This lesson is part of a pilot project, and will be shared in its final version in an Oregon Open Learning Lesson Collection. 

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Shannon Johnson

Taiko Drumming and Identity with Michelle, Toru and Unit Souzou | Arts, Care & Connection

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About the Arts, Care & Connection Lesson Pilot Series: Arts for Learning Northwest collaborated with Oregon teaching artists on the development of this series of four arts courses designed for K-5 students, with integrated social emotional learning content in the areas of dance, visual arts, theater, and music. This lesson is part of a pilot project, and will be shared in its final version in an Oregon Open Learning Lesson Collection. 

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Shannon Johnson

Remix

Primary Physical Education Creative Dance Unit

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This unit is presented as a progression of tasks that allow students to explore movement through a variety of creative tasks. Students will move in personal and general space, while exploring elements of shape, size, speed, force, flow, and time. To promote student confidence and willingness in dance, teachers should isolate the dance elements before asking students to apply these elements using imagery or partner/group tasks.The National Standards and Grade-Level Outcomes in this unit are referenced from the "National Standards & Grade Level Outcomes for K-12 Physical Education."SHAPE America Outcomes:KindergartenPerforms locomotor skills in response to teacher-led creative dance. (S1.E5.K)Maintains momentary stillness on different bases of support. (S1.E7.Ka)Forms wide, narrow, curled and twisted body shapes. (S1.E7.Kb)Contrasts the actions of curling and stretching. (S1.E10.K)Travels in general space with different speeds. (S2.E3.K)Recognizes that when you move fast, your heart beats faster and you breathe faster.3 (S3.E3.K)Follows directions in group settings (e.g., safe behaviors, following rules, taking turns). (S4.E1.K)Identifies physical activities that are enjoyable. (S5.E3.Ka)Grade OneCombines locomotor and nonlocomotor skills in a teacher- designed dance. (S1.E5.1)Maintains stillness on different bases of support with different body shapes. (S1.E7.1)Demonstrates twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions. (S1.E10.1)Differentiates between fast and slow speeds. (S2.E3.1a)Differentiates between strong and light force. (S2.E3.1b)Identifies the heart as a muscle that grows stronger with exercise, play and physical activity. (S3.E3.1)Accepts personal responsibility by using equipment and space appropriately. (S4.E1.1)Describes positive feelings that result from participating in physical activities. (S5.E3.1a)Grade TwoPerforms a teacher- and/or student- designed rhythmic activity with correct response to simple rhythms. (S1.E5.2)Balances on different bases of support, combining levels and shapes. (S1.E7.2a)Differentiates among twisting, curling, bending and stretching actions. (S1.E10.2)Combines balances and transfers into athree-part sequence (i.e., dance, gymnastics). (S1.E11.2)Varies time and force with gradual increases and decreases. (S2.E3.2)Identifies physical activities that contribute to fitness. (S3.E3.2b)Practices skills with minimal teacher prompting. (S4.E1.2)Identifies physical activities that provide self-expression (e.g. dance, gymnastics routines, practice tasks in games environments). (S5.E3.2)Photo Attribution: KCBalletMedia (Photography: Brett Pruitt & East Market Studios)References:Graham, G., Holt/Hale, S. A., & Parker, M. (2013). Children moving: A reflective approach to teaching physical education. 9th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill.Joyce, M. (1994). First steps in teaching creative dance to children. California: Mayfield Publishing.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Dorann Avey

Poetry Lesson

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This resource was created by Kate Steffen, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Arts ESU2

Chicana Dance Crew Blends Tap and Mexican Footwork | If Cities Could Dance

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La Mezcla is an all-female San Francisco dance company rooted in Latinx traditions, Chicano culture and social justice. Founder Vanessa Sanchez and the other dancers blend tap dance and zapateado or traditional footwork from Veracruz, Mexico, to create a style they call “zapatap.” Watch as they perform dynamic choreography in front of iconic Mission District murals and landmarks, then bring us back to the 1940s West Coast Zoot Suit era (popularized by Bay Area playwright Luis Valdez) when young Mexican-Americans or “pachucas” proudly repped Chicana identity and resistance, while defying cultural and style taboos. Rocking big hair and flashy zoot suits, the women of La Mezcla reclaim this early history, combining tap with son Jarocho Zapateado. If Cities Could Dance is a Webby Award-winning video series featuring dancers from cities across the United States. Step into the shoes of dancers from across the country who dare to imagine what it would look like if their city could dance.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Zydeco in Houston: Black Cowboys, Trail Rides & Creole Roots | If Cities Could Dance

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Houston’s zydeco dance scene brings joy and a driving rhythm to partner dancing, and in this episode, we explore the dance’s deep roots in Creole culture and music. What was called La-la in Southeastern Louisiana Creole communities became known as zydeco in Houston with the influence of R & B and the ‘King of Zydeco’, Clifton Chenier. Houston is where zydeco is thriving, evolving and reaching a broader audience, around trail-riding clubs who dance together after their rides to the accordion-driven sounds of zydeco bands with a touch of hip-hop. As infectious as zydeco is, it’s grown popular worldwide, but what hasn't changed is how zydeco brings community together in Houston. If Cities Could Dance is a Webby Award-winning video series featuring dancers from cities across the United States. Step into the shoes of dancers from across the country who dare to imagine what it would look like if their city could dance.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Boogaloo: The Dance That Defined Oakland's Culture | If Cities Could Dance

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Inspired by James Brown and the Black Panthers, the Black Resurgents are one of the dance crews who pioneered Oakland's boogaloo dance, the foundation of many other funk styles. However, their cultural contributions are little-known outside of the Bay. Meet these veteran dancers passing on their tradition to a new a generation, bridging the gap between boogaloo, pop-locking and turf dancing. Oakland, California, home to the Black Panthers, also birthed the pioneering funk-driven freestyle dance Oakland Boogaloo, characterized by strong hits and poses. In the late 1960s and 1970s, before the emergence of hip hop, the city’s African American youth took inspiration from James Brown, the Temptations, Charlie Chaplin, cartoon characters, and sci-fi robots, and created a repertoire of original moves like the “Dime Stop,” the “Hit, the “Mack Pose” and “the Ditallion.” Youth in nearby San Francisco and Richmond soon developed variants of boogaloo, respectively known as strutting and robotting. Today, these techniques are collectively known as “the funk styles,” owing to their development during the funk era. Despite its pioneering status, Oakland boogaloo’s cultural contributions are little-known outside of Bay Area dance circles.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Black Roller Skaters Are Carrying Forward LA's Iconic Scene | If Cities Could Dance

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In Los Angeles, jam skaters draw from a community and culture built over generations at Venice Beach and at rinks across the city. Over the past year, roller skating hit the mainstream as a safe and relatively accessible pandemic-era pastime, its international popularity bolstered by people recording their shaky progress on social media. Skates were sold out for months, and skaters have become major influencers on Instagram and TikTok. But longtime skaters are quick to remind everyone: This isn’t a fad.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Dear Dancer: A Video Chain Letter to Move You | If Cities Could Dance

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Sixteen dancers from across the country, representing a range of dance styles, move as one being, with each dancer's moves flowing naturally into the next. Poet Chinaka Hodge narrates each dancer’s steps from all around the United States as we shelter-in-place. Inspired by Mitchell Rose's Exquisite Corps chain letter, each dancer begins in the last pose of the dancer before passing the movement. If Cities Could Dance is a Webby Award-winning video series featuring dancers from cities across the United States. Step into the shoes of dancers from across the country who dare to imagine what it would look like if their city could dance. Extension Project: Give your middle and high school students the opportunity to create and publish original dance videos with an accompanying artist statement with the KQED Youth Media Challenge: If Schools Could Dance.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media

Folklore Dance with Luciana | Arts, Care & Connection

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About the Arts, Care & Connection Lesson Pilot Series:Arts for Learning Northwest collaborated with Oregon teaching artists on the development of this series of four arts courses designed for K-5 students, with integrated social emotional learning content in the areas of dance, visual arts, theater, and music. This lesson is part of a pilot project, and will be shared in its final version in an Oregon Open Learning Lesson Collection. 

Material Type: Lesson

Author: Shannon Johnson

Shakespearean Sonnets

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This lesson is intended for students who are new to Shakespeare and his writing. In the lesson, students will read about sonnets, read and respond to specific Shakespearean sonnets, and explore the poetic elements - specifically meter and rhyme - of Shakespearean sonnets. This lesson was created by Tyler Barna as part of the 2020 NDE OER Workshop and was conceived from Maxx Stewart's lesson posted to OER Commons. It is designed for beginning Shakespeare students, typically in English Language Arts grades 8-10. It is expected that this lesson will take students 90 minutes to complete. All materials are linked digitally within the lesson. This lesson is written for students; "Student View" is the recommended output for this lesson. 

Material Type: Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Reading

Author: Tyler Barna

Theme Analysis in Poetry

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In this lesson students will learn about Louise Erdrich and then read her poem “Advice to Myself #2: Resistance.” As students read they will analyze how the writer uses words, phrases, and details to communicate a theme. Students will discuss the message of the poem in both small and large groups and discuss how the author’s literary choices help communicate this message. Students will then write about a message in the poem and explain what lines most strongly communicate that message as evidence to support their thinking.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Deanna Delgado, Oregon Open Learning

Documentary Photography with Paccarik Orue | KQED Art School

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In this episode of Art School, visit Paccarik Orue in the studios of Rayko Photo Center where he is currently an Artist-In-Residence. Tag along with Orue as he makes photographs in the Iron Triangle neighborhood of Richmond, California. From 2009-2011, Orue photographed residents and structures there for his book titled, There Is Nothing Beautiful Around Here. Orue also introduces us to his latest body of work, which is centered in the city of Cerro de Pasco in his home country of Peru. Cerro de Pasco is one of the highest cities in the world, perched atop the Andean Mountains. Even though he has returned to his homeland, Orue feels like an outsider. In the second video, learn how to scan, clean and color-correct medium format film, as Orue demonstrates the necessary steps for digitizing color film negatives.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: PBS Learning Media