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5 To One Ha
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Abolition Frowned Down
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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A satire on enforcement of the "gag-rule" in the House of Representatives, prohibiting discussion of the question of slavery. Growing antislavery sentiment in the North coincided with increased resentment by southern congressmen of such discussion as meddlesome and insulting to their constituencies. The print may relate to John Quincy Adams's opposition to passage of the resolution in 1838, or (more likely) to his continued frustration in attempting to force the slavery issue through presentation of northern constituents' petitions in 1839. In December 1839 a new "gag rule" was passed by the House forbidding debate, reading, printing of, or even reference to any petition on the subject of abolition. Here Adams cowers prostrate on a pile composed of petitions, a copy of the abolitionist newspaper the "Emancipator," and a resolution to recognize Haiti. He says "I cannot stand Thomson's [sic] frown." South Carolina representative Waddy Thompson, Jr., a Whig defender of slavery, glowers at him from behind a sack and two casks, saying "Sir the South loses caste whenever she suffers this subject to be discussed here; it must be indignantly frowned down." Two blacks crouch behind Thompson, one saying "de dem Bobolishn is down flat!" Weitenkampf cites an impression with an imprint naming Robinson as printer and publisher, this line being apparently trimmed from the Library's impression. The drawing style and handling of the figures strongly suggest that "Abolition Frowned Down" is by the same Robinson artist as the anonymous "Called to Account" and "Symptoms of a Duel" (nos. 1839-10 and -11).|Drawn by HD?|Entd . . . 1839 by H.R. Robinson . . . Southn. Dist. of N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 59.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-12.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
An Affecting Scene In Kentucky
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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A racist attack on Democratic vice-presidential candidate Richard M. Johnson. The Kentucky Congressman's nomination, in May 1835, as Van Buren's running-mate for the 1836 election raised eyebrows even among party faithful, because of Johnson's common-law marriage to a mulatto woman, Julia Chinn, by whom he fathered two daughters. The artist ridicules Johnson's domestic situation, and the Democrats' constituency as well. Seated in a chair with his hand over his face, a visibly distraught Johnson lets a copy of James Watson Webb's "New York Courier and Enquirer" fall to the floor and moans, "When I read the scurrilous attacks in the Newspapers on the Mother of my Children, pardon me, my friends if I give way to feelings!!! My dear Girls, bring me your Mother's picture, that I may show it to my friends here." On the right are his two daughters, Adaline and Imogene, wearing elegant evening dresses. One presents a painting of a black woman wearing a turban, and says, "Here it is Pa, but don't take on so." The second daughter says, "Poor dear Pa, how much he is affected." A man behind them exclaims, "Pickle! Pop!! and Ginger!!! Can the slayer of Tecumseh be thus overcome like a summer cloud! fire and furies. oh!" Johnson is reported to have slain the Indian chief Tecumseh. Flanking Johnson are a gaunt abolitionist (right) and a black man. The abolitionist holds a copy of the "Emancipator," a Hartford, Connecticut newspaper, and says, "Be comforted Richard; all of us abolitionists will support thee." The black man pledges, ". . . de honor of a Gentlemen dat all de Gentlemen of Colour will support you." On the far left is a stout postmaster who says, "Your Excellency, I am sure all of us Postmasters and deputies will stick to you; if you promise to keep us in office." The print seems to date from early in the campaign of 1836. Johnson's wife Julia Chinn died in 1833. Adaline, one of the two daughters pictured, died in February 1836. Although Weitenkampf dates the print at 1840, when Johnson was again Van Buren's running-mate, the presence of both daughters and the drawing style are persuasive evidence for an 1836 date.|Probably published by Henry R. Robinson, New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 63.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-15.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
African American Identity in the Gilded Age: Two Unreconciled Strivings
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Students use Library of Congress primary sources to examine how African-Americans in the Gilded Age were able to form a meaningful identity for themselves and reject the inferior images fastened upon them.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Lesson Plans
Date Added:
07/23/2021
African American Women Unite for Change (Teaching with Historic Places) (U.S. National Park Service)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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As a historic unit of the National Park Service, the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The site also is within the boundaries of the Logan Circle Historic District. This lesson is based on the Historic Resources Study for Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site, as well as other materials on Bethune and the National Council of Negro Women. The lesson was written by Brenda K. Olio, former Teaching with Historic Places historian, and edited by staff of the Teaching with Historic Places program and Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Political Science
Reading Informational Text
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
National Park Service
Author:
Brenda K. Olio
Date Added:
01/19/2022
The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Noted Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. recounts the full trajectory of African-American history in his groundbreaking series The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. The series explores the evolution of the African-American people, as well as the multiplicity of cultural institutions, political strategies, and religious and social perspectives they developed — forging their own history, culture and society against unimaginable odds.

Using video clips from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross, this collection of lesson plans addresses a wide range of themes of the African-American experience from 1500 to the present.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Module
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
The WNET Group
Date Added:
01/30/2023
Am I Not A Man and A Brother?
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The large, bold woodcut image of a supplicant male slave in chains appears on the 1837 broadside publication of John Greenleaf Whittier's antislavery poem, "Our Countrymen in Chains." The design was originally adopted as the seal of the Society for the Abolition of Slavery in England in the 1780s, and appeared on several medallions for the society made by Josiah Wedgwood as early as 1787. Here, in addition to Whittier's poem, the appeal to conscience against slavery continues with two further quotes. The first is the scriptural warning, "He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death. "Exod[us] XXI, 16." Next the claim, "England has 800,000 Slaves, and she has made them free. America has 2,250,000! and she holds them fast!!!!" The broadside is advertised at "Price Two Cents Single; or $1.00 per hundred.|N.Y. sold at the Anti-Slavery Office, 144 Nassau St. 1837.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Wedgwood Portraits and the American Revolution, p. 116-117.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-16.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
American Memory from the Library of Congress
Read the Fine Print
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American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Amistad Digital Resource
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
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This resource provides three modules on Black history in the United States. The modules discuss three historical eras, including the "plantation to ghetto, Civil Rights Era, and The Future and the Present." Each module includes text, images, and video.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Columbia University
Date Added:
09/01/2023
Baseball, Race Relations and Jackie Robinson
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Students use Library of Congress primary sources to examine race relations in the mid-20th century United States through a close reading of two documents relating to Jackie Robinson's breaking of the racial...

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Lesson Plans
Date Added:
08/15/2022
Black Historical Figures (Lorenzo Dow Turner)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This is a 4 week reading and critical interrogation assignment for students at the Higher ed level... Image in Title is by Florida_Aaron - https://pixabay.com/users/florida_aaron-3954368/

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Joanna Schimizzi
Date Added:
02/09/2022
The Blessings of Liberty Or How To "hook" A "gentleman of Color"
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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0.0 stars

A diverse group of abolitionists try to drag an unwilling black man toward the left with a large gaff hook. Holding the hook are (left to right) an old hag, a Quaker man, and two other homely men. The hag declares, "How perverse our dear colored brother is, I shall break my wind if I pull much longer." The Quaker says, "Verily it is hard work to set this Ethiopian at liberty. I fear we must break his back before we can succeed." A woman behind him enjoins "Pull on brethren till you have broken every yoke." Another young woman (center) asks the black, "Don't you feel the blessings of liberty?" The black protests, "Bress my soul, Massa Robolition, why you kidnap me 'way from Massa Clay? Let poor nigger go 'bout his bizness, and hab his own way dis once, and I berry glad." The black struggles to join Henry Clay and Horace Greeley, on the right, who stand with hands joined. The elderly Clay stands leaning on his cane. Greeley, in top hat and white coat, points toward the right and advises Clay, "Don't look behind you, friend Harry, but come and see my crack article on the Tariff." Weitenkampf dates the cartoon 1851, on the basis of the reference to Greeley's support of trade protectionism. The apparent double entendre of the word "hook" in the title is puzzling.|Probably drawn by H. Bucholzer.|Published by Nathaniel Currier, New York?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 102.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1851-7.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The Bloody Massacre Perpetrated In King Street Boston On March 5th 1770 By A Party of The 29th Regt.
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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0.0 stars

A sensationalized portrayal of the skirmish, later to become known as the "Boston Massacre," between British soldiers and citizens of Boston on March 5, 1770. On the right a group of seven uniformed soldiers, on the signal of an officer, fire into a crowd of civilians at left. Three of the latter lie bleeding on the ground. Two other casualties have been lifted by the crowd. In the foreground is a dog; in the background are a row of houses, the First Church, and the Town House. Behind the British troops is another row of buildings including the Royal Custom House, which bears the sign (perhaps a sardonic comment) "Butcher's Hall." Beneath the print are 18 lines of verse, which begin: "Unhappy Boston! see thy Sons deplore, Thy hallowed Walks besmeared with guiltless Gore." Also listed are the "unhappy Sufferers" Saml Gray, Saml Maverick, James Caldwell, Crispus Attucks, and Patrick Carr (killed) and it is noted that there were "Six wounded; two of them (Christr Monk & John Clark) Mortally."|Engrav'd Printed & Sold by Paul Revere Boston.|The print was copied by Revere from a design by Henry Pelham for an engraving eventually published under the title "The Fruits of Arbitrary Power, or the Bloody Massacre," of which only two impressions could be located by Brigham. Revere's print appeared on or about March 28, 1770.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Brigham, p. 41-57.|Cresswell, no. 246.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1770-1.|Published in: Viewpoints; a selection from the pictorial collections of the Library of Congress . . . Washington : Library of Congress, 1975, no. 56.|Exhibited in: Creating the United States, Library of Congress, 2008.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Bobalition of Slavery
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Another in the series of "bobalition" broadsides, marking the July 14 celebration of the anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade. (See no. 1819-2). The text, facetiously dated "Uly 14teenth 18 hundred and 30 tu," consists of a letter to "Captain Ookpate" from "Pomp Peters" and "Cezar Garbo" regarding the celebratory procession, along with notes on toasts, volunteers, etc. The broadside is illustrated with a cut of a standing black man facing right and another caricature of a strutting militiaman armed with a cutlass and broom.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Rei lly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-4.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
[Calendar For 1863]
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

An advertising calendar for a lithographic printer, with various patriotic motifs and a subtle commentary on the Emancipation Proclamation. The calendar, for 1863, is set within an elaborate architectural framework. The whole is draped with an enormous flag which hangs down from an enthroned Columbia at top. Columbia sits holding a sword and shield, an eagle on her left, and a globe and the Constitution at her feet. Further left are a plough, scythe, and wheat sheaves. On the right appear symbols of progress and industry including a telescope, locomotive, anvil and hammer, millstone and gear wheel, and bales and barrels of goods. On the middle register are symbols of the arts, sciences, and learning, including an easel painting, palette and brushes, musical instruments, books, urns, and a tapestry. On the far left a seaman mans a cannon before a backdrop of sails and smokestacks. On the right an infantryman stands guard with his dog before an encampment. At the bottom are two scenes. The scene on the left shows three black children and a white child, who watches idly as one of the three stands on a cotton bale and whitewashes over a placard reading "1862." Another black child, kneeling on a crude wooden block with chains attached to it (an allusion to slavery), holds the bucket of whitewash, and the third blows soap bubbles. In the scene on the right the roles are reversed: as the white child works, the three black children are idle. Standing on a pedestal labeled "Emancipation," the white boy inscribes the date "1863" on a panel. He holds a portfolio under his arm. A black child sits on a classical cornice at left, holding a small bucket of paint while one of his companions reclines on the ground. The third black child sits fiddling on a fallen column nearby. A small hourglass appears in a vignette below the calendar. |Ehrgott, Forbriger & Co. Lith. Cincinnati.|Entered . . . 1862 by Ehrgott, Forbriger & Co. . . . Ohio.|The Library's impression of the calendar was deposited for copyright on January 3, 1863. |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1862-18.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The Candidate of Many Parties. A Phrenological Examination To Ascertain What His Political Principles Are
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

Whig nominee Zachary Taylor's reluctance to clearly declare his political views was an issue eagerly exploited by the opposition in the 1848 campaign. Here the artist shows phrenologist Orson S. Fowler probing the candidate's skull to determine his "principles," as New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley (left) takes notes. Greeley asks, "What for a Prsident would he make?" Fowler replies, "he says he is 'Incompetent,' & so say his developments." Taylor (center) sits grumbling, "When I get to Washington I will turn [Postmaster General] Cave Johnson out, and put a good Military man in his place, This paying 7.50 for "dead letters," is too much for me to stand." Beginning in late July the "dead letter" issue was a source of great popular amusement at Taylor's expense. After Taylor's nomination in early June, he was sent a letter by John Morehead offering him the candidacy. In an economizing move, Taylor had recently instructed the local postmaster in Baton Rouge not to forward to him any letters on which postage was not prepaid. Consequently, Morehead's notification of nomination was among the mail that landed in the dead letter office in Washington, and after several weeks cost Taylor $7.50 to have retrieved. Among the long list of Taylor's characteristics that Greeley and Fowler have compiled are: "A Quick Fiery Temper," "A lack of self respect," and "Disregard for things Sacred." Each of these falls under a broader category, such as "Combativeness," which is accompanied by a number designating its degree of "development." The number six indicates an ideal level of development, anything lower being deficient. Seven, the highest possible score, was excessive. Here Taylor scores a seven in "Combativeness," but only receives a one for "Self Esteem." In "Firmness" he receives a fourteen, making him remarkably "Obstinate & Mulish." Shelved on the back wall at right are specimens of heads and skulls, including those of Martin Van Buren, James Watson Webb, Henry Clay, and a black man. Posted on the left is a sign advertising "Fowler & Wells. Phrenologists, 131 Nassau St. Clinton Hall, N. York."|Drawn by "W.J.C."|Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Lithd. & published by H.R. Robinson-31 Park Row New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Lorant, p. 19.|Weitenkampf, p. 93-94.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-24.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Civil War Images: Depictions of African Americans in the War Effort
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A selection of Library of Congress primary sources exploring the ways in which African Americans were depicted in the Civil War effort. This set also includes a Teachers Guide with historical context and teaching suggestions.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Primary Source Set
Date Added:
08/19/2022