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Native American Stories Science Connections
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The original Native American story component lesson was developed as part of an Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and Washington State Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform (LASER) project funded through an EPA Region 10 grant. The stories were told by Roger Fernandes of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. Mr. Fernandes has been given permission by the tribes to tell these stories.As these lessons and stories were shared prior to the adoption of the Washington State Science Learning Standards in 2013, there was a need to align these stories with the current science standards. This resource provides a current alignment and possible lesson suggestions on how these stories can be incorporated into the classroom. This alignment work has been funded by the NGSS & Climate Science Proviso of the Washington State Legislature as a part of North Central Educational Service District's award.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Elementary Education
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Ethnic Studies
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
MECHELLE LALANNE
Barbara Soots
Ellen Ebert
Carissa Haug
Johanna Brown
Lori Henrickson
Kimberley Astle
Date Added:
04/28/2020
Ocean Acidification: A Systems Approach to a Global Problem
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In this curriculum module, students in high school life science, marine science, and/or chemistry courses act as interdisciplinary scientists and delegates to investigate how the changing carbon cycle will affect the oceans along with their integral populations.

The oceans cover 70 percent of the planet and play a critical role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide through the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes. As a result of anthropogenic activity, a doubling of the atmospheric CO2 concentration (to 760 ppm) is expected to occur by the end of this century. A quarter of the total CO2 emitted has already been absorbed by the surface oceans, changing the marine carbonate system, resulting in a decrease in pH, a change in carbonate-ion concentrations, and a change in the speciation of macro and micronutrients. The shift in the carbonate system is already drastically affecting biological processes in the oceans and is predicted to have major consequences on carbon export to the deep ocean with reverberating effects on atmospheric CO2. Put in simple terms, ocean acidification is a complex phenomenon with complex consequences. Understanding complexity and the impact of ocean acidification requires systems thinking – both in research and in education. Scientific advancement will help us better understand the problem and devise more effective solutions, but executing these solutions will require widespread public participation to mitigate this global problem.

Through these lessons, students closely model what is occurring in laboratories worldwide and at Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) through Monica Orellana’s research to analyze the effect CO2 has on ocean chemistry, ecosystems and human societies. Students experiment, analyze public data, and prepare for a mock summit to address concerns. Student groups represent key “interest groups” and design two experiments to observe the effects of CO2 on seawater pH, diatom growth, algal blooms, nutrient availability, and/or shell dissolution.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Aisha McKee
Alexis Boleda
Alexis Valauri-Orton
Allison Lee Cusick
Anna Farrell-Sherman
Baliga Lab
Barbara Steffens
Claudia Ludwig
Danny Thomson
Dexter Chapin
Dina Kovarik
Donald Cho
Eric Grewal
Eric Muhs
Helen Ippolito
Holly Kuestner
Institute for Systems Biology
Jeannine Sieler
Jennifer Duncan-Taylor
Jia Hao Xu
JoAnn Chrisman
Jocelyn Lee
Kedus Getaneh
Kevin Baker
Mari Knutson Herbert
Megan DeVault
Meredith Carlson
Michael Walker
Monica V. Orellana
Nitin S. Baliga
Olachi Oleru
Raisah Vestindottir
Steven Do
Systems Education Experiences
William Harvey
Zac Simon
Date Added:
03/09/2023
Oh, Salmon!
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Through this lesson, students in 3rd-5th grade will understand how the human history of a local creek (Whatcom Creek in this example) affects the health of salmon populations. This lesson is an active way to engage students in graphing through the use of models and uses critical thinking to understand implications of human actions in the past and in the future.

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Game
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Date Added:
07/29/2019
Online Course: Creating Resources for Equitable At-Home Science Learning
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CC BY-SA
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This online course explores together with teachers how we can provide students equitable place-based home science learning during the time of COVID-19. We examine guidelines and discuss various approaches, then collaborate together to share, develop and adapt short and simple science activities that could be done by students in their yard, neighborhood, or a deck, window, or balcony. The course includes an introductory session, two small groups sessions to develop or adapt class and age appropriate materials and a final session for groups to share what they developed and explore additional topics.

Subject:
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Brad Street
Date Added:
07/03/2020
Our Invisible Forest: What's in a Drop of Seawater?
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Take a breath — where does the oxygen you inhaled come from? In our changing world, will we always have enough oxygen? What is in water that supports life? What is known? How do we know what we know about our vast oceans? These are just a few of the driving questions explored in this interactive STEAM high school curriculum module.

Students in marine science, environmental science, physics, chemistry, biology, integrated science, biotechnology and/or STEAM courses can use this curriculum module in order to use real-world, big data to investigate how our “invisible forest” influences ocean and Earth systems. Students build an art project to represent their new understanding and share this with the broader community.

This 4-week set of lessons is based on the oceanographic research of Dr. Anne Thompson of Portland State University in Oregon, which focuses on the abundant ocean phytoplankton Prochlorococcus. These interdisciplinary STEAM lessons were inspired by Dr. Thompson’s lab and fieldwork as well as many beautiful visualizations of Prochlorococcus, the ocean, and Earth. Students learn about the impact and importance of Prochlorococcus as the smallest and most abundant photosynthetic organism on our planet. Through the lessons, students act as both scientists and artists as they explore where breathable oxygen comes from and consider how to communicate the importance of tiny cells to human survival.

This module is written as a phenomenon-based, Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) three-dimensional learning unit. Each of the lessons below also has an integrated, optional Project-Based Learning component that guides students as they complete the PBL process. Students learn to model a system and also design and evaluate questions to investigate phenomena. Students ultimately learn what is in a drop of ocean water and showcase how their drop contributes to our health and the stability and dynamics of global systems.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Amanda Cope
Anne W. Thompson
Baliga Lab
Barbara Steffens
Claudia Ludwig
Emily Borden
Institute for Systems Biology
Jeannine Sieler
Linnea Stavney
Mari Knutson Herbert
Mark Buchli
Michael Walker
Nitin S. Baliga
Portland State University
Uzma Khalil
Date Added:
03/09/2023
PEI SOLS 1st Grade Renewable Energy: Solar
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Solar energy in the form of light is available to organisms on Earth in abundance. In this storyline, students explore cultural connections with the sun, learn about light and discover how light interacts with other materials through hands-on activities, literacy integration and engineering.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/15/2021
PEI SOLS 2nd Grade Urban Forestry: The Needs of Trees
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Trees grow all around us. Sometimes they are in large forests and sometimes they are single trees along the road or in our schoolyards. In this storyline, students explore cultural connections with trees, learn about the characteristics of trees, and discover what trees need to grow through handson activities, art, and literacy integration.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/22/2021
PEI SOLS 2nd grade Coastal Hazards: Erosion
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Erosion is a natural hazard that causes major damage and can cause homes to collapse. In this storyline, students are introduced to weathering and erosion. Students will gain an understanding of coastal erosion by experimenting with different types of erosion control practices, including seawalls and riprap.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/15/2021
PEI SOLS 2nd grade Wetland: Habitats
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The goal of the second grade Wetland: Habitat storyline is to introduce students to wetlands and the living things that call them home. In this storyline students develop an understanding of what a habitat is, different types of habitats, what living animals and plants can be found in a wetland, and what plants need to grow

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
PEI SOLS 3rd Grade Coastal Hazards: Flooding
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The Washington State coastline is a culturally important place and valuable resource for communities of people, animals, and plants throughout Washington and the United States. As coastal flooding from storms and erosion threatens our coastal environments, communities are forced to make difficult decisions about how to protect themselves, their history, and their livelihoods. In this Storyline, students will learn what coastlines are and why they are important to humans and other types of natural communities. Given the specific weather hazard of coastal flooding, they will test materials and design structures that could be used to help reduce the impacts caused by this hazard.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/15/2021
PEI SOLS 3rd Grade Fire: Wildfires in Washington
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A change in climate over time has contributed to a significant increase of wildfires in our state. In this storyline, students will make the connection between changes in ecosystems and the interconnectedness of all things. Students will gain an understanding of combustion (fire triangle), and observe through data that certain conditions (humidity, temperature, fuel load, etc.) contribute to forest fires (fire environment triangle). 

Subject:
Environmental Science
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2020
PEI SOLS 3rd grade Fire: Wildfire in Washington (Spanish)
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Un cambio en el clima a lo largo del tiempo ha contribuido a un aumento significativo de los incendios forestales en nuestro estado. En este caso, los estudiantes harán la conexión entre los cambios en los ecosistemas y la interconexión de todas las cosas. Los estudiantes aprenderán sobre la combustión (triángulo de fuego) y observarán a través de los datos, que ciertas condiciones (humedad, temperatura, carga de combustible, etc.) contribuyen a los incendios forestales (triángulo del ambiente de fuego).

Subject:
Elementary Education
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
PEI SOLS 4th Grade Natural Hazards: Erosion
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What we see on Earth’s surface is a complex and dynamic set of interconnected systems that include the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, cryosphere and biosphere. Earth’s processes are the result of energy flow and matter cycling within and among these systems. Understanding Earth’s systems is important for many decisions made in communities today such as where to build a road, where a salmon can successfully build a redd to lay eggs, and how to ensure air quality. Erosion involves all five spheres giving students an excellent example of the interconnectedness of these large systems.  Students may begin the storyline by hearing a story about the relationship between the land and plants from an Indigenous perspective, a local tribe elder or expert if possible. This perspective can be woven throughout the storyline while students explore different types of erosion: wind, water and ice in sand and soil. For real life experiences, students visit their schoolyard or nearby area to find examples of erosion. They may find examples from very small to larger examples of places where soil has eroded. They may find places where human foot traffic has made pathways through a previously planted area.  

Subject:
Environmental Science
Geology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2020
PEI SOLS 4th Grade Natural Hazards: Erosion (Spanish)
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Lo que vemos en la superficie de la Tierra es un conjunto complejo y dinámico de sistemas interconectados que incluyen la geósfera, la hidrósfera, la atmósfera, la criósfera y la biósfera. Los procesos de la Tierra son el resultado del flujo de energía y el ciclo de la materia que está dentro y entre estos sistemas. Comprender los sistemas de la Tierra es importante para muchas decisiones que se toman hoy en las comunidades, por ejemplo en dónde construir una carretera, en dónde un salmón puede poner huevos con éxito y cómo garantizar la calidad del aire. La erosión involucra las cinco esferas, lo que brinda a los estudiantes un excelente ejemplo de la interconexión de estos grandes sistemas.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Geology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/15/2021
PEI SOLS 4th grade Renewable Energy: Solar
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Solar energy in the form of light is available to organisms on Earth in abundance. Natural systems and other organisms have structures that function in ways to manage the interaction with and use of this energy. In this storyline, students compare resources used for energy and their effect on the atmosphere. Students will explore how light energy interacts with materials and how light energy can be transformed into energy for heating and cooling.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/15/2021
PEI SOLS 5th grade Food Waste
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While food waste is not typically seen as contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, it is a major contributor. Reducing food waste is the 3rd most beneficial drawdown solution. Wasted food, and the resources to produce that food, are responsible for approximately 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. When individuals and groups reduce food waste, it has a huge impact on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Food waste awareness is applicable to every person and community. In this storyline, students conduct a “food waste audit”. Each participating class of students collects, sorts and measures their food waste for one day at lunch. Students discuss the local and global causes and effects of food waste in the environment. Students will also learn the cultural connections around food waste from experts or elders from the local Indian tribe and inquire how different agencies in the community deal with food waste (e.g, grocery store, food bank, city). Suggestion for how students can present their findings and create an action plan are also included. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2020
PEI SOLS 5th grade Food Waste (Spanish)
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Mientras que el desperdicio de comida no es típicamente visto como un contribuyente de emisiones de gas de efecto invernadero, es un contribuyente mayor. Reducir el desperdicio de comida es la 3era solución más beneficiosa para la reducción de dichos gases. La comida desperdiciada y los recursos para producirla, son responsables del aproximadamente 8% de las emisiones globales de gases de efecto invernadero. Cuando los individuos y grupos reducen el desperdicio de comida, esto tiene un gran impacto en la reducción de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. La conciencia del desperdicio de comida es aplicable a cada persona y comunidad. En este caso, los estudiantes van a conducir una “auditoría de desperdicio de comida”. Cada clase de estudiantes participantes recolecta, clasifica y mide su desperdicio de comida por un día durante el almuerzo. Los estudiantes discuten las causas locales y globales y los efectos del desperdicio de comida en el ambiente. Los estudiantes también aprenden las conexiones culturales alrededor del desperdicio de comida de los expertos o gente mayor de las tribus locales, e indagan cómo las diferentes agencias en la comunidad lidian con el desperdicio de comida (e.g. tiendas de abarrotes, bancos de comida, la ciudad). Los estudiantes presentan sus resultados y crean un plan de acción.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
PEI SOLS: 5th grade Forests: Ecosystem Benefits
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El objetivo del caso de quinto grado, Bosques: Beneficios del ecosistema forestal, es aprovechar el conocimiento previo de los estudiantes sobre las necesidades de las plantas / animales, los ecosistemas y la protección de los recursos de la Tierra. En este caso, los estudiantes desarrollan una comprensión de los ecosistemas forestales, los beneficios de los árboles, incluyendo la captura de carbono, y lo que los árboles necesitan para crecer/ agregar masa. 

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
07/29/2021
PEI SOLS 5th grade Forests: Forest Ecosystem Benefits
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The goal of the fifth grade Forests: Forest Ecosystem Benefits storyline is to build on students’ previous knowledge of plant/animal needs, ecosystems, and protection of Earth’s resources. In this storyline students develop an understanding of forest ecosystems, tree benefits including carbon sequestration, and what trees need to grow/gain mass. 

Subject:
Environmental Science
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2020
PEI SOLS 5th grade: Regenerative Agriculture (Eastern Washington)
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Soil quality is an important aspect of growing food. In this storyline, students will discover what soil is made of and how carbon is an important part of soil quality as well as how carbon moves between plants, soil, and air. Students will learn how Indigenous people used practices such as composting. Finally, students will explore what regenerative agriculture practices are and how they can be a solution to how the climate is changing over time.  

Subject:
Environmental Science
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2020