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English Language Arts, Grade 12, Satire and Wit
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Students will consider the different ways that humor can be used by a writer to criticize people, practices, and institutions that he or she thinks are in need of serious reform. Students will read satirists ranging from classical Rome to modern day to examine how wit can be used to make important points about culture.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students research an aspect of modern life that they would like to lampoon.
Students read from satirists across history to absorb the style and forms of humor and institutions satirized.
Students write their own satire, drawing on techniques of famous satirists to criticize their targets.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What is satire, and when is it too harsh?
How can humor and irony make you more persuasive?
What do you think is funny? How far would you go to satirize it?
Who gets more reaction—satirists or protestors?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Introduction to Media Studies, Fall 2003
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Offers an overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic impact of mediated communication on modern culture. Combines critical discussions with hands-on "experiments" working with different media. Media covered include radio, television, film, the printed word, and digital technologies. Topics include the nature and function of media, core media institutions, and media in transition.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Walsh, Andrea S.
Date Added:
01/01/2003
Making a
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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The purpose of this course is for adult learners to improve their communication skills, particularly writing, by arguing effectively for a raise. Their arguments will consist of evidence-based claims. Additionally, the lesson provides general guidelines on how to respond to the rejection of a raise and criticism of one's work. The target audience of this lesson is adults at the 7th grade reading and writing level. This lesson is intended for a real classroom. This module involves reading, writing and speaking components. The entire lesson will take roughly 45 minutes to complete.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
01/10/2018