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2021 Wyoming Reads
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The Sue Jorgensen Library Foundation was created in 1996 to benefit libraries and advance the cause of childhood literacy in Wyoming.  The program has grown to include celebrations in all of Wyoming’s 23 counties, distributing a book to every first grader in Wyoming.  Each year since 2006, the Governor has issued a proclamation declaring Wyoming Literacy Day to fall in conjunction with this valuable statewide celebration. The student choice boards will connect students to each book selected for Wyoming Reads 2021 and provide activities to go along with the theme of each book.  Make a Copy 2021 Student Choice Boards

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Interactive
Author:
Stefanie Hunt
Date Added:
05/01/2021
21st Century Literature from the Philippines and the World
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Most of the learners here in our area don't have much access to the internet because there is no signal reception. They can sometimes access but only for those who can afford. So, teachers preferred modular learning. 21st Century Literature from the Philippines and the World is a senior high school subject which aims to engage students in appreciation and critical study of 21st Century Literature from the Philippines and the World, encompassing their various dimensions, genres, elements, structure, contexts, and traditions. In order to attain this, different activities are implemented. Other activities also have the need to apply multimedia and ICT skills. This resource is a way in applying multimedia and ICT skills of the students in spite of the fact that not all of them have the accessibility on the internet. This is just a step to mold students' skill in using multimedia.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Ednamie Gabonada
Date Added:
07/24/2021
5. Historical Fiction Book Clubs
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In fifth grade unit 5, Reading Historical Fiction Book Clubs, students will be organized into reading clubs consisting of 3-5 students of similar reading levels as they read historical fiction text set made up of related historical fiction, informational text and primary sources (photographs, letters, posters etc.) How do readers read, analyze and interpret historical fiction text? to understand their historical fiction and the time period connected to the text.
Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Oakland Schools
Date Added:
06/20/2017
5th Grade Reading and Writing - Tall Tale
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This lesson uses tall tale read alouds to reinforce the common elements, or text structure, of tall tales. As the text is read aloud, students examine the elements of the book that are characteristic of tall tales. Then using what they've learned, they write and perform tall tales of their own.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
Performing Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Beth Einspahr
Date Added:
07/24/2020
ACR Core Family Stories
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Students will be able to ask and answer questions about key details in a text. Students will be able to compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Tia Astarb
Date Added:
03/27/2020
Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Reader 2
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Short Description:
This reader, written specifically for adults, contains eight chapters about Langston Hughes' family history and personal life. It includes excerpts from many of Hughes' poems and is designed to accompany the BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English - Course Pack 2. This level 2 reader, one of a series of six readers, is roughly equivalent to grades 1.5 to 3 in the K-12 system. Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This reader has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Long Description:
This reader, written specifically for adults, contains eight chapters about Langston Hughes’ family history and personal life. It includes excerpts from many of Hughes’ poems and is designed to accompany the BC Reads: Adult Literacy Fundamental English – Course Pack 2. This level 2 reader, one of a series of six readers, is roughly equivalent to grades 1.5 to 3 in the K-12 system.

Each chapter in this reader mirrors a chapter in the accompanying course pack. It is suggested that instructors locate the full versions of these poems in books or on the web. Some or all of this author’s works are in the public domain. It is also recommend that instructors read Hughes’ excellent short story Thank You, Ma’am with their students.

Font size and line spacing can be adjusted in the online view, and have been enhanced for the print and PDF versions for easier reading. This reader has been reviewed by subject experts from colleges and universities.

Word Count: 2648

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically as part of a bulk import process by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided. As a result, there may be errors in formatting.)

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Shantel Ivits
Date Added:
03/09/2020
Advanced German Literature & Culture: Madness, Murder, Mysteries
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides the opportunity to discuss, orally and in writing, cultural, ethical, and social issues on a stylistically sophisticated level. It explores representative and influential works from the nineteenth century to the present, through literary texts (prose, drama, poetry), radio plays, art, film, and architecture, as well as investigates topics such as the human and the machine, science and ethics, representation of memory, and issues of good and evil. Taught in German.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Languages
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Weise, Peter
Date Added:
09/01/2014
Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have exhausted itself more than two decades ago.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Graphic Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Scribner, Charity
Date Added:
02/01/2004
African American Literature
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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AAS 267, African American Literature, is a survey course that will take us from the early days of enslavement to the present. We will read, analyze, and discuss literary texts written by African Americans, paying particular attention to the political, historical and social context that informs these texts.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
City University of New York
Author:
Anne Rice
Date Added:
12/13/2022
African American Protest Poetry, Freedom's Story, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center
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CC BY-NC
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Given the secondary position of persons of African descent throughout their history in America, it could reasonably be argued that all efforts of creative writers from that group are forms of protest. However, for purposes of this discussion, Defining African American protest poetrysome parameters might be drawn. First—a definition. Protest, as used herein, refers to the practice within African American literature of bringing redress to the secondary status of black people, of attempting to achieve the acceptance of black people into the larger American body politic, of encouraging practitioners of democracy truly to live up to what democratic ideals on American soil mean. Protest literature consists of a variety of approaches, from the earliest literary efforts to contemporary times. These include articulating the plight of enslaved persons, challenging the larger white community to change its attitude toward those persons, and providing specific reference points for the nature of the complaints presented. In other words, the intention of protest literature was—and remains—to show inequalities among races and socio-economic groups in America and to encourage a transformation in the society that engenders such inequalities. For African Americans, Some of the questions motivating African American protest poetrythat inequality began with slavery. How, in a country that professed belief in an ideal democracy, could one group of persons enslave another? What forms of moral persuasion could be used to get them to see the error of their ways? In addition, how, in a country that professed belief in Christianity, could one group enslave persons whom Christian doctrine taught were their brothers and sisters? And the list of “hows” goes on. How could white Americans justify Jim Crow? Inequalities in education, housing, jobs, accommodation, transportation, and a host of other things? In response to these “hows,” another “how” emerged. How could writers use their imaginations and pens to bring about change in the society? Protest literature, therefore, focused on such issues and worked to rectify them. Poetry is but one of the media through which writers address such issues, as there are forms of protest fiction, drama, essays, and anything else that African Americans wrote—and write.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
National Humanities Center
Trudier Harris
Date Added:
05/03/2019
After Columbus
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres - reports, captivity narratives, essays, novels, poetry, drama, and film. Some of the earlier authors we will read are Michel Montaigne, William Shakespeare, Jean de Léry, Daniel Defoe and Mary Rowlandson; more recent authors include Derek Walcott, and J. M. Coetzee.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
09/01/2003
Alma Strikes a Chord
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Short Description:
When Alma tries to write a song for her boyfriend Quang, she learns that actions speak louder than words.

Long Description:
When Alma tries to write a song for her boyfriend Quang, she learns that actions speak louder than words.

This short novel for low-intermediate students of English introduces more quirky characters from Portland set in the world of Stig Digs In.

Word Count: 9124

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Date Added:
03/01/2021
American Authors: American Women Authors
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This subject, cross-listed in Literature and Women's Studies, examines a range of American women authors from the seventeenth century to the present. It aims to introduce a number of literary genres and styles- the captivity narrative, slave novel, sensational, sentimental, realistic, and postmodern fiction- and also to address significant historical events in American women's history: Puritanism, the American Revolution, industrialization and urbanization in the nineteenth century, the Harlem Renaissance, World War II, the 60s civil rights movements. A primary focus will be themes studied and understood through the lens of gender: war, violence, and sexual exploitation (Keller, Rowlandson, Rowson); the relationship between women and religion (Rowlandson, Rowson, Stowe); labor, poverty, and working conditions for women (Fern, Davis, Wharton); captivity and slavery (Rowlandson, Jacobs); class struggle (Fern, Davis, Wharton, Larsen); race and identity (Keller, Jacobs, Larsen, Morrison); feminist revisions of history (Stowe, Morrison, Keller); and the myth of the fallen woman (take your pick). Essays and in-class reports will focus more particularly on specific writers and themes and will stress the skills of close reading, annotation, research, and uses of multimedia where appropriate.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Literature
Reading Literature
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
02/01/2003
American Authors: Autobiography and Memoir
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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What is a "life" when it's written down? How does memory inform the present? Why are autobiographies and memoirs so popular? This course will address these questions among others, considering the relationship between biography, autobiography, and memoir and between personal and social themes. We will examine classic authors such as Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Mark Twain; then more recent examples like Tobias Wolff, Art Spiegelman, Sherman Alexie, Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Edwidge Danticat, and Alison Bechdel.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
09/01/2013
American Classics
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This subject is devoted to reading and discussing basic American historical texts that are often cited but often remain unread, understanding their meaning, and assessing their continuing significance in American culture. Since it is a "Communications Intensive" subject, 21H.105 is also dedicated to improving students' capacities to write and speak well. It requires a substantial amount of writing, participation in discussions, and individual presentations to the class.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
02/01/2006
American Classics
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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"What then is the American, this new man?" asked J. Hector St-John de Crèvecoeur in his Letters from an American Farmer in 1782. This subject takes Crèvecoeur's question as the starting point for an examination of the changing meanings of national identity in the American past. We will consider a diverse collection of classic texts in American history to see how Americans have defined themselves and their nation in politics, literature, art, and popular culture. As a communications-intensive subject, students will be expected to engage intensively with the material through frequent oral and written exercises.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Capozzola, Christopher
Lepera, Louise
Date Added:
09/01/2002
American Literature
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
02/01/2013
American Literature I
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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0.0 stars

American Literature I (1650–1860) examines significant literary works of early American and Puritan literature, the Enlightenment, American Romanticism, and pre-Civil War era. The course includes primary texts (many accompanied by video/audio options), historical background, literary criticism and interpretation, and instruction on writing about literature.

This course was developed by Anne Eidenmuller from Columbia Basin College with contributing work from Lumen Learning.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Reading
Provider:
LibreTexts
Author:
Anne Eidenmuller
Date Added:
12/13/2022