Updating search results...

Search Resources

269 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • evolution
100th Day of School Activities
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Resources to mark the 100th day of school with math activities. Challenge students to generate 100 different ways to represent the number 100. Students will easily generate 99 + 1 and 50 + 50, but encourage them to think out of the box. Challenge them to include examples from all of the NCTM Standards strands: number sense, numerical operations, geometry, measurement, algebra, patterns, data analysis, probability, discrete math, Create a class list to record the best entries. Some teachers write 100 in big bubble numeral style and then record the entries inside the numerals.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Mathwire
Author:
Terry Kawas
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Acidic Oceans Prompt Evolution
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

It's no secret that greenhouse gases warm the planet and that this has dire consequences for the environment whole islands swallowed up by rising seas, animal and plant species stressed by higher temperatures, and upsets in ecological interactions as populations move to cooler areas. However, carbon dioxide has another, less familiar environmental repercussion: making the Earth's oceans more acidic. Higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere mean that more carbon dioxide dissolves in the ocean. This dissolved carbon dioxide forms carbonic acid the same substance that helps give carbonated beverages their acidic kick. While this process isn't going to make the ocean fizzy anytime soon, it is introducing its own set of challenges for marine organisms like plankton and coral.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
University of California Museum of Paleontology
Provider Set:
Understanding Evolution
Date Added:
10/01/2012
Adaptive Radiation: Darwin's Finches
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Finches on the Galapagos Islands have evolved to exploit almost every possible niche. This diagram shows the range of food sources available on the island and the different beak shapes adapted to exploit each of them.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
The Airplane Graveyeard
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

During World War Two, a fierce battle between American and Japanese forces on Kwajalein atoll left a trail of debris on the deep lagoon floor. This lagoon now has one of the largest collections of well-preserved aircraft in the world. In this video, as part of the first ever film crew allowed onto this secret military base, Jonathan explores a B-25, F4-U Corsair and Dauntless dive bomber still sitting on the bottom of the ocean, as if ready to take off. Please see the accompanying study guide for educational objectives and discussion points.

Subject:
Oceanography
Physical Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Jonathan Bird's Blue World
Provider Set:
Jonathan Bird's Blue World
Author:
Jonathan Bird Productions
Oceanic Research Group
Date Added:
03/01/2007
Allopatric Speciation
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

These images from the Smithsonian Institution depict Nancy Knowlton's work with snapping shrimp in Panama. Knowlton found that the closing of the isthmus -- dividing the Pacific Ocean from the Caribbean -- resulted in new species of shrimp.

Subject:
Geoscience
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
09/26/2003
Analyzing datasets in ecology and evolution to teach the nature and process of science
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This quarter-long project forms the basis of a third-year course for majors and nonmajors at the University of Washington, Bothell called Science Methods and Practice. Students use databases to identify novel research questions, and extract data to test their hypotheses. They frame the question with primary literature, address the questions with inferential statistics, and discuss the results with more primary literature. The product is a scientific paper; each step of the process is scaffolded and evaluated. Given time limitations, we avoid devoting time to data collection; instead, we sharpen
students' ability to make sense of a large body of quantitative data, a situation they may rarely have encountered.

We treat statistics with a strictly conceptual, pragmatic, and abbreviated approach; i.e., we ask students to know which basic test to choose to assess a linear relationship vs. a difference between two means. We stress the need for a normal distribution
in order to use these tests, and how to interpret the results; we leave the rest for stats courses, and we do not teach the mathematics. This approach proves beneficial even to those who have already had a statistics course, because it is often the first time
they make decisions about applying statistics to their own research questions.

We incorporate peer review and collaborative work throughout the quarter. We form collaborative groups around the research questions they ask, enabling them to share primary literature they find, and preparing them well to review each other's writing. We encourage them to cite each other's work. They write formal peer reviews of each other's papers, and they submit their final paper with a letter-to-the-editor highlighting how their research has addressed previous feedback.

A major advantage of this course is that an instructor can easily modify it to suit any area of expertise. Students have worked with data about how a snail's morphology changes in response to its environment (Price, 2012), how students understand genetic drift (Price et al. 2014), maximum body size in the fossil record (Payne et al. 2008), range shifts (Ettinger et al. 2011), and urban crop pollination (Waters and Clifford 2014).

(Note: this resource was added to OER Commons as part of a batch upload of over 2,200 records. If you notice an issue with the quality of the metadata, please let us know by using the 'report' button and we will flag it for consideration.)

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Environmental Science
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Teach the Earth
Author:
Rebecca Price
Date Added:
06/14/2022
The Anthropology of Biology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course applies the tools of anthropology to examine biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. It examines such social concerns such as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning. It offers an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology—ecological, organismic, cellular, molecular, genetic, informatic—are changing. It examines such artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artificial life models, and using primary sources in biology, social studies of the life sciences, and literary and cinematic materials, and asks how we might answer Erwin Schrodinger’s 1944 question, “What Is Life?” today.

Subject:
Anthropology
Biology
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Stefan Helmreich
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria At the Meat Counter
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

The pork chops you buy in the supermarket neatly packaged in plastic and styrofoam may look completely sterile, but are, in fact, likely to be contaminated with disease-causing bacteria - and not with just any old bugs, but with hard-to-treat, antibiotic resistant strains. In a recently published study, researchers with the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System bought meat from a wide sampling of chain grocery stores across the country and analyzed the bacteria on the meat. Resistant microbes were found in 81% of ground turkey samples, 69% of pork chops, 55% of ground beef samples, and 39% of chicken parts.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
University of California Museum of Paleontology
Provider Set:
Understanding Evolution
Date Added:
05/01/2013
Attraction and Beauty
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

More attractive people elicit more positive first impressions. This effect is called the attractiveness halo, and it is shown when judging those with more attractive faces, bodies, or voices. Moreover, it yields significant social outcomes, including advantages to attractive people in domains as far-reaching as romance, friendships, family relations, education, work, and criminal justice. Physical qualities that increase attractiveness include youthfulness, symmetry, averageness, masculinity in men, and femininity in women. Positive expressions and behaviors also raise evaluations of a person’s attractiveness. Cultural, cognitive, evolutionary, and overgeneralization explanations have been offered to explain why we find certain people attractive. Whereas the evolutionary explanation predicts that the impressions associated with the halo effect will be accurate, the other explanations do not. Although the research evidence does show some accuracy, it is too weak to satisfactorily account for the positive responses shown to more attractive people.

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Leslie Zebrowitz
Robert G. Franklin
Date Added:
11/02/2022
Bacteria and Chronic Infections -  Adaptation and Evolution of Bacteria (09:35)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this presentation, we talk about adaptation and evolution of bacteria. Furthermore, we will discuss how you can work with or against evolution, regarding the treatment of bacteria and biofilms.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Author:
Professor Thomas Bjarnsholt
Date Added:
11/02/2018
Bacteria and Chronic Infections -  Evolution in Biofilms Part 1 (08:40)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this presentation, we will introduce you to evolution in biofilms and chronic infections. The general principles of evolution are independent of the specific environment, however some conditions related to time and space are faced by bacteria in chronic infections - and this affects evolution

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Author:
Associate Professor Mette Burmølle
Date Added:
11/02/2018
Bacteria and Chronic Infections -  Evolution in Biofilms Part 2 (15:28)
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this presentation, we will tell you about social evolution in microbes and in continuation of this discuss why social evolution in microbes is important in biofilms.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Copenhagen
Author:
Associate Professor Steve Diggle
Date Added:
11/02/2018
Bad At Estimating? Blame Evolution
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

The next time you are in the kitchen, try this experiment: pick up a box of butter (four sticks) in one hand and a box of saltines (four packets) in the other. Which is heavier? If you said the butter, you are not alone. Most people would identify the box of butter as the heavier object even though, if you look at the labels, you'll see that they both weigh exactly one pound! This is an example of the size-weight illusion, and it is incredibly common. Read more to see the evolution (and baseball) connection ...

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
University of California Museum of Paleontology
Provider Set:
Understanding Evolution
Date Added:
02/01/2011
The Bandana Game: Spotted Dolphins
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

In the open ocean around the Bahamas, pods of wild Spotted Dolphins frolic in the sunshine. Sometimes, they get bored and approach boats. In this educational video, Jonathan joins dolphin expert Wayne Scott Smith to learn how dolphins interact with each other. Jonathan learns how to play the Bandana Game, a game of -keep away- that the dolphins invented and like to play with Scott. Please see the accompanying study guide for educational objectives and discussion points.

Subject:
Life Science
Zoology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Jonathan Bird's Blue World
Provider Set:
Jonathan Bird's Blue World
Author:
Jonathan Bird Productions
Oceanic Research Group
Date Added:
03/01/2007
Battle of the Aedes
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Two mosquito species in America have been engaged in a battle for dominance for the past 30 years: the native Aedes aegypti and the invasive Aedes albopictus -- also known as the Asian tiger mosquito The tiger mosquito has a distinct competitive advantage Male Aedes albopictus are really good at wooing female Aedes aegypti The resultant interspecies mating permanently sterilizes the female, effectively ending her reproductive future But Aedes aegypti are evolving the ability to resist the advances of Aedes albopictus Although this is good news for Aedes aegypti the outlook is darker for humans, as Aedes aegypti are key transmitters of diseases like Zika and dengue fever Researchers have now started to uncover the genetic changes tied to this resistance Uncovering the molecular correlates governing mosquito mating preferences could lead to better control strategies and might help prevent future outbreaks of disease Burford Reiskind, et al..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Genetics
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Bean-Counter Evolution
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Hunt for prey and discover the meaning of evolutionary “fitness” in this physically active group game. In this simulation game, teams of predators equipped with genetically different “mouths” (utensils) hunt for “prey” (assorted beans). Over several “generations” of play, the fittest among the predators and prey dominate the population, modeling the evolutionary process of natural selection.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Provider Set:
Science Snacks
Date Added:
04/03/2019
Becoming Human: Interactive Documentary
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Becoming Human is an interactive documentary experience that tells the story of human origins. Multimedia, research and scholarship are presented to promote greater understanding of the course of human evolution. This site includes classroom materials, subject-designed exercises, games and activities to help make connections between the concepts that are presented and student learning. PDF versions of the resources may be downloaded from the site.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Institute of Human Origins
Provider Set:
Becoming Human
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
08/20/2011
Being Darwin's Finches
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This is an activity that involves students modeling the behavior and competition that Charles Darwin's finches would have gone through as they competed for food and space on the Galapagos Islands. Some will survive. Some won't.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Author:
Laura Reese
Date Added:
12/09/2011