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After Columbus
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Sometime after 1492, the concept of the New World or America came into being, and this concept appeared differently - as an experience or an idea - for different people and in different places. This semester, we will read three groups of texts: first, participant accounts of contact between native Americans and French or English speaking Europeans, both in North America and in the Caribbean and Brazil; second, transformations of these documents into literary works by contemporaries; third, modern texts which take these earlier materials as a point of departure for rethinking the experience and aftermath of contact. The reading will allow us to compare perspectives across time and space, across the cultural geographies of religion, nation and ethnicity, and finally across a range of genres - reports, captivity narratives, essays, novels, poetry, drama, and film. Some of the earlier authors we will read are Michel Montaigne, William Shakespeare, Jean de Léry, Daniel Defoe and Mary Rowlandson; more recent authors include Derek Walcott, and J. M. Coetzee.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
09/01/2003
American Literature
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This course studies the national literature of the United States since the early 19th century. It considers a range of texts - including, novels, essays, and poetry - and their efforts to define the notion of American identity. Readings usually include works by such authors as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Emily Dickinson, and Toni Morrison.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
02/01/2013
The American Novel: Stranger and Stranger
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This course covers works by major American novelists, beginning with the late 18th century and concluding with a contemporary novelist. The class places major emphasis on reading novels as literary texts, but attention is paid to historical, intellectual, and political contexts as well. The syllabus varies from term to term, but many of the following writers are represented: Rowson, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Wharton, James, and Toni Morrison. Previously taught topics include The American Revolution and Makeovers (i.e. adaptations and reinterpretation of novels traditionally considered as American "Classics"). May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission so long as the content differs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kelley, Wyn
Date Added:
02/01/2013
British Literature OER
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CC BY-NC
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British Literature OER is a dynamic online anthology enriched with educational resources such as introductions and footnotes, tailored for educational settings. It allows users to download content in multiple formats, including PDF, Word, EPUB, and HTML. More than just a collection of public domain literature, this platform actively curates and continuously expands its offerings. It is regularly updated and reviewed to include new interpretations, scholarly research, and additions to the public domain.

Currently, the anthology focuses on literature from the Romantic Era, the Victorian Age, and the early twentieth century; however, works from earlier time periods will be added in the future.

***We're continually updating this OER, so please reach out if there is any content that you'd like to see added.***

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jeremy Larance
Date Added:
04/23/2024
Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart: Oral and Literary Strategies
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CC BY
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Students learn the linguistic strategies Achebe uses to convey the Igbo and British missionary cultures presented in the novel and how the text combines European linguistic and literary forms with African oral traditions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Classics of Chinese Literature
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This course is an introduction to three of the major genres of traditional Chinese literature—poetry, fiction and drama, with a focus on vernacular fiction. We will read translations of a number of the "masterworks" of Chinese literature. We will also examine the intertextuality between these genres — how poetry blends into narrative, how fiction becomes drama, and drama inspires fiction. Through reading these selected works of traditional Chinese literature, we will examine some of the major features of traditional Chinese society: religious and philosophical beliefs, the imperial system and dynastic change, gender relations, notions of class and ethnicity, family, romance and sexuality. All works are read in translation; no language background is necessary.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Teng, Emma
Date Added:
09/01/2011
Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain
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When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely across genre, from lyric poetry and the novel to diary entries, philosophical prose, and political essays, including texts by Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Mary Astell, David Hume, Laurence Sterne, Olaudah Equiano, Mary Hays, and Mary Shelley. Topics to be discussed include the construction of gender identities; the individual in society; imagination and the poet's work. There will be two essays, one 5-6 pages and one 8-10 pages in length, and required presentations.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Literature
Philosophy
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Date Added:
02/01/2003
Forms of Western Narrative
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This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission, the artistic significance of the chosen texts and their identity as anthropological artifacts whose conventions and assumptions are rooted in particular times, places, and technologies. Authors will include: Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Christian evangelists, Marie de France, Cervantes, La Clos, Poe, Lang, Cocteau, Disney-Pixar, and Maxis-Electronic Arts, with theoretical readings in Propp, Bakhtin, Girard, Freud, and Marx.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Graphic Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cain, James
Date Added:
02/01/2004
Frankenstein Background Knowledge
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Each year, students conduct research focussed on a chosen topic related to Frankenstein and the 1800s. They watch each others' presentations before we begin our novel and this allows them to begin the novel with a lot of background knowledge!

Each presentation includes pictures with citations, a works cited, voice narration or background music, and a brief summary on their chosen topic. Enjoy!

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Student Guide
Date Added:
12/07/2017
Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course studies representative twentieth and twenty-first-century texts and films from Hispanic America and Spain. Emphasis is on developing strategies for analyzing the genres of the novel, the short story, the poem, the fictional film, and the theatrical script. The novels read this semester are Magali García Ramis's Felices días, Tío Sergio (1986, Puerto Rico) and Javier Cercas's Soldados de Salamina (2001, Spain). We will study Lorca's play "La casa de Bernarda Alba" (1936, Spain), films from Spain, México, and Cuba, poems by Darío (Nicaragua), Machado (Spain), Lorca (Spain), Hernández (Spain), Vallejo (Perú), Cernuda (Spain), and Luis Palés Matos (Puerto Rico), and short stories from México (by an exiled Spanish writer), Chile, Argentina, and Cuba. Thematic emphasis is on the Spanish Civil War, changing attitudes toward gender, the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, and the history of race in the Americas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Languages
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Garrels, Elizabeth
Date Added:
09/01/2007
Introduction to Contemporary Hispanic Literature
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This course studies important twentieth century texts from Spain and Latin America. The readings include short stories, theatre, the novel and poetry. This subject is conducted in Spanish and all reading and writing for the course is also done in Spanish.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Languages
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Resnick, Margery
Date Added:
02/01/2005
Introduction to Fiction
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This course investigates the uses and boundaries of fiction in a range of novels and narrative styles, traditional and innovative, western and non-western, and raises questions about the pleasures and meanings of verbal texts in different cultures, times, and forms.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Eiland, Howard
Fox, Elizabeth
Date Added:
02/01/2002
Major English Novels
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This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Joseph Conrad, H. G. Wells, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Salman Rushdie.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Buzard, James
Date Added:
02/01/2004
Major English Novels
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In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lipkowitz, Ina
Date Added:
02/01/2009
Major English Novels: Reading Romantic Fiction
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Though the era of British Romanticism (ca. 1790-1830) is sometimes exclusively associated with the poetry of these years, this period was just as importantly a time of great innovation in British prose fiction. Romantic novelists pioneered or revolutionized several genres, including social/philosophical problem novels, tales of sentiment and sensibility, and the historical novel. Writing in the years of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, and the early industrial revolution, these writers conveyed a spirit of chaos and upheaval even in stories whose settings are seemingly farthest removed from those cataclysmic historical events. In this year's offering of "Major English Novels," we will read of plagues, wars, hysterics, monsters and more in novels by authors including William Godwin, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, and Walter Scott. In the final weeks of the semester, we will read one major novel of the Victorian era, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, in light of these earlier texts. There will be two essay assignments, one 5-7 pages and one 8-10 pages in length, and required presentations.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Date Added:
02/01/2002
Major European Novels
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This subject traces the history of the European novel by studying texts that have been influential in connection with two interrelated ideas. (1) When serious fiction deals with matters of great consequence, it should not deal with the actions of persons of consequence—kings, princes, high elected officials and the like—but rather with the lives of apparently ordinary people and the everyday details of their social ambitions and desires. To use a phrase of Balzac's, serious fiction deals with "what happens everywhere". (2) This idea sometimes goes with another: that the most significant representations of the human condition are those dealing with persons who try to compel society to accept them as its destined agent, despite their absence of high birth or inheritance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kibel, Alvin
Date Added:
09/01/2008
The Novel Unit - Brave New World
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This resource provides lecture notes and writing assignments for the study of a novel - in this case, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. These notes and assignments, however, can be adapted and applied to practically any novel. Unless otherwise noted, this resource is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Higher Education
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Author:
Daniel Kelley
Judith Westley
Nina Adel
Graham Harkness
Date Added:
07/27/2021
Plant-derived Extracellular Vesicles: a novel nanomedicine approach with advantages and challenges
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Many eukaryotic cells make and release small pockets of membrane called extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs facilitate communication between cells in an organism and can transport many molecules like proteins, RNA, and lipids. Plants are no exception, and many types of EVs can be isolated from their juice, flesh, and roots. In the plants themselves, these EVs facilitate a range of critical functions like immunity, development, and plant–fungi communication. But EVs derived from plants could even have a place in human medicine. In particular, these EVS could be used to transport medications. Plant-derived EVs are more biodegradable and typically less expensive to generate than conventional synthetic carriers, as they can be extracted in bulk. This field is in its early stages, but studies have suggested that plant-derived EVs may also be less toxic and allergenic than conventional carriers..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
03/02/2023
Reading Fiction
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Reading Fiction is designed to sharpen your skills as a critical reader. As we explore both short stories and novels focusing on the theme of "the city in literature," we will learn about the various elements that shape the way we read texts - structure, narrative voice, character development, novelistic experimentation, historical and political contexts and reader response.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Braithwaite, Alisa
Date Added:
02/01/2007