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Canada’s Residential Schools: Missing Children and Unmarked Burials (PDF)
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Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 4.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Canada’s Residential Schools: Reconciliation (PDF)
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Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 6.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Canada’s Residential Schools: The History, Part 1 Origins to 1939
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Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 1, part 1.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Canada’s Residential Schools: The History, Part 2: 1939 to 2000 (PDF)
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Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 1, part 2.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Canada’s Residential Schools: The Inuit and Northern Experience (PDF)
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Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 2.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Canada’s Residential Schools: The Legacy (PDF)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 5.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Canada’s Residential Schools: The Métis Experience (PDF)
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Public Domain
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The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada Volume 3.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Government of Canada
Provider Set:
Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
Author:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Decolonizing Social Work with Indigenous Communities
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CC BY-NC-SA
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"Decolonizing Social Work" is a course taught at Humboldt State University in California. These resources provide an introduction to the topic of decolonizing social work, an example syllabus, suggested textbook, suggested approach for an introductory lesson and links to additional resources. This material was provided by Humboldt State University.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
04/27/2015
English Language Arts: Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an Act of Sovereignty Part 1
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries tribal nations and Indigenous communities have continued to assert their right to self-governance and sovereignty despite numerous efforts to force them to assimilate. By extension, the purposeful erasure of Indigenous peoples as a living and thriving presence in the current, modern-day world also remains a reality.  Tribal sovereignty predates the existence of the U.S. government and the state of Oregon. Tribalgovernments are separate and unique sovereign nations with the power to execute their self-governance to protect the health, safety, and welfare of their citizens and to govern their lands, air, and waters. One of the ways Indigenous communities have been embodying their right to sovereignty is through the establishment of an Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Indigenous Peoples’ Day serves as a reminder of the contributions, both past and present, of Indigenous communities and tribal nations. In this lesson, students will explore the concepts of tribal sovereignty and self-determination and learn about efforts by tribes and other entities to promote and support the celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day. This lesson is meant to be used with its companion lesson: Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an Act of Sovereignty Part II.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Aujalee Moore
April Campbell
Date Added:
04/02/2021
English Language Arts: Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an Act of Sovereignty Part 2
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries tribal nations and Indigenous communities havecontinued to assert their right to self-governance and sovereignty despite numerous efforts to forcethem to assimilate. By extension, the purposeful erasure of Indigenous peoples as a living and thriving presence in the contemporary world also remains a reality. Tribal sovereignty predates the existence of the U.S. government and the state of Oregon. Tribal governments are separate and unique sovereign nations with the power to execute their self governance to protect the health, safety, and welfare of their citizens and to govern their lands, air, and waters. One of the ways Indigenous communities have been embodying their right to sovereignty is through the establishment of an Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Indigenous Peoples’ Day serves as reminder of the contributions, both past and present, of Indigenous communities and tribal nations. This lesson extends the knowledge gained from Part I by asking students to make meaning of Indigenous Peoples’ Day and to explore how advocacy leads to a local proclamation and change.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Aujalee Moore
April Campbell
Date Added:
04/16/2021
Expanding student understanding of Indigenous worldviews
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CC BY-NC
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This OER will showcase how using examples and discussions of comparable indigenous experiences benefits both Native and non-Native student cultural awareness in the classroom. While IEFA focusses upon Montana Indian histories and experiences, I use film, art, and other forms of material culture to ask students to engage broadly with other indigenous communities within and outside of the United States. Often these examples are shown next to local forms of cultural expression. This exposure, its comparative component, and the analytical discussion of such, has proven to help them understand and appreciate the local indigenous perspectives more clearly than when these local perspectives are studied/discussed in isolation. The OER will outline several exercises and assignments that have proven successful in enabling both Native and non-Native students to develop a wider cultural consciousness than they began with.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Date Added:
05/20/2016
Healing and Reconciliation Through Education
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CC BY-SA
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Short Description:
This open educational resource is focused on teaching the history of the colonial legacy of Residential Schools, with an emphasis on exploring the unique history of the Shingwauk Residential School which operated in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. This project builds upon decades of archival research and data collection, including the recording of oral histories, under the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre’s (SRSC) mandate of ‘sharing, healing, and learning.’ ‘Realizing Healing and Reconciliation through Education’ is designed to increase the capacity of the SRSC to educate local, regional, and national audience about the history of Residential Schools.

Long Description:
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Final Report cited healing, reconciliation, and restoring the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians as a critical priority for all Canadians. Moreover, the Commission exhorted Canada’s museums and galleries to work with Indigenous Peoples to better present their cultures and histories, including histories of assimilation, cultural loss and reclamation. The Shingwauk Residential Schools centre (SRSC) is taking up the charge to realize this vision through a multi phase education and outreach strategy, this ebook is part of that educational project.

This open educational resource is focused on teaching the history of the colonial legacy of Residential Schools, with an emphasis on exploring the unique history of the Shingwauk Residential School which operated in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. This project builds upon decades of archival research and data collection, including the recording of oral histories, under the SRSC’s mandate of ‘sharing, healing, and learning.’ ‘Realizing Healing and Reconciliation through Education’ is designed to increase the capacity of the SRSC to educate local, regional, and national audience about the history of Residential Schools.

Word Count: 13410

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre
Author:
Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre
Date Added:
02/27/2019
Historical and Contemporary Realities: Movement Towards Reconciliation
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CC BY-NC
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The Traditional and Cultural Significance of the Lands Encompassing the District of Greater Sudbury and Area

Long Description:
The idea behind the creation of this open textbook is twofold. First, it is written as a resource for educators to teach students about the Indigenous historical significance of the lands encompassing the Robinson-Huron Treaty area and more specifically the Greater Sudbury and Manitoulin area. Secondly, through the use of interactive mapping strategies, the textbook will serve as a guide for educators to develop a similar resource to document Indigenous stories from their own areas. This open textbook is designed to be used at an introductory level to teach about social welfare issues within the Honours Bachelor of Indigenous Social Work program situated in the School of Indigenous Relations at Laurentian University. The material contained within this open textbook is broad enough that it can be used in other disciplines – sociology, education, law and justice, architecture, etc. Fo This text consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the gathering of Indigenous stories and their historical significance within the Greater Sudbury area. Chapters 2 – 5 are strucured using the medicine wheel as its framework. Finally, Chapter 6 focuses on braiding Indigenous and Western approaches.

Word Count: 39605

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Bettina Brockerhoff-Macdonald
Susan Manitowabi
Date Added:
10/25/2021
Histories of Indigenous Peoples and Canada
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CC BY
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Since the 18th century, the historical study of “Indians,” “Natives,” and “Aboriginals” in universities and colleges was contextualized within the story of colonization and growing European influence. Whatever justification might be mustered for that practice, it had real and dire effects: Canadians — including many Indigenous people — came to understand Indigenous histories as tangential, small, unimportant, and even a blind alley. This kind of thinking enabled Canadian authorities and citizens to regard Indigenous communities as being “without history,” as in, outside of history, which we can agree in modern times is simply untrue, as this book strives to show. The preface introduces you to some of the practices and challenges of Indigenous history, focusing on the nature and quality of sources, innovative historical methodologies, and the leading historiographical trends (that is, what historians are thinking very broadly and what they have studied in the last decade or four). It turns, then, to histories of Indigenous peoples in the Western Hemisphere before ca. 1500. The twelve chapters that follow are arranged under three headings: Commerce and Allies, Engaging Colonialism, and Culture Crisis Change Challenge. And there is a thirteenth chapter that brings us deep enough into the twenty-first century to allow a visit with two of the most important recent developments in Canadian civic life: Idle No More and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Both of these processes arose from the failures of colonialism and the resilience of Indigenous communities. They reveal, therefore, as much about the history of Canada as they do of the historical experiences of Indigenous peoples.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Author:
John Douglas Belshaw
Sarah Nickel
et al.
Date Added:
02/01/2022
Indigenizing the 21st Century Classroom
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CC BY-NC
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This OER showcases the use of tools such as twitter, blogs, and other forms of social media, as a project for increasing cultural awareness in the classroom. These tools create spaces in the classroom for culturally responsive engagement between Native and non-Native students. Using contemporary indigenous activism as the focus of a semester-long project, I will discuss the steps taken to enable students to explore contemporary Native issues from indigenous perspectives. The ‘real-time’ environment of social media enables the students to engage with multiple indigenous perspectives in a pro-active, rather than passive, manner. The OER will also show how this exploration leads to increased student intellectual awareness and engagement with the indigenous world around them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Module
Date Added:
06/30/2016
Knowing Home: Braiding Indigenous Science with Western Science Book 1
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Knowing Home attempts to capture the creative vision of Indigenous scientific knowledge and technology that is derived from an ecology of a home place. The traditional wisdom component of Indigenous Science—the values and ways of decision-making—assists humans in their relationship with each other, the land and water, and all of creation. Indigenous perspectives have the potential to give insight and guidance to the kind of environmental ethics and deep understanding that we must gain as we attempt to solve the increasingly complex problems of the 21st century.

Subject:
Life Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Author:
Gloria Snively
Wanosts’a7 Lorna Williams
Date Added:
10/25/2021
Knowing Home: Braiding Indigenous Science with Western Science, Book 2
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Short Description:
Knowing Home attempts to capture the creative vision of Indigenous scientific knowledge and technology that is derived from an ecology of a home place. The traditional wisdom component of Indigenous Science—the values and ways of decision-making—assists humans in their relationship with each other, the land and water, and all of creation. Indigenous perspectives have the potential to give insight and guidance to the kind of environmental ethics and deep understanding that we must gain as we attempt to solve the increasingly complex problems of the 21st century.NewParaBraiding Indigenous Science and Western Science is a metaphor used to establish a particular relationship. Linked by braiding, there is a certain reciprocity. Each strand remains a separate entity, but all strands come together to form the whole. When we braid Indigenous Science with Western Science we acknowledge that both ways of knowing are legitimate forms of knowledge.NewParaThe book provides a window into the vast storehouse of innovations and technologies of the Indigenous peoples who live in Northwestern North America. It is our hope that the Indigenous Science examples, research and curriculum models will inspire deep reflection regarding the under-representation of Aboriginal students in the sciences. It is intended that the rich examples and cases, combined with the resources listed in the appendices, will enable teachers and students to explore Indigenous Science examples in the classroom, and in addition, support the development of curriculum projects in home places.

Word Count: 88142

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Victoria
Provider Set:
University of Victoria Libraries
Author:
Edited by Gloria Snively
Wanosts'a7 Lorna Williams
Date Added:
11/30/2018
Moon of the Crusted Snow: Reading Guide
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Word Count: 4222

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Ethnic Studies
Reading Literature
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Ontario Tech University
Author:
OER Lab
Date Added:
02/10/2022
National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Description of Visual Elements
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Among the various visual elements illustrating Indigenous cultures, the circle is at the centre, which represents being together in spirit of reconciliation. The orange colour represents truth-telling and healing. The pathway represents the road to reconciliation. First Nations, Inuit and Métis are represented in the image.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Graphic Arts
Social Science
Sociology
World Cultures
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Government of Canada
Date Added:
09/30/2022