Author:
Barbara Soots, Washington OSPI OER Project, Jerry Price
Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Teaching/Learning Strategy
Level:
Upper Primary
Tags:
  • American Revolution
  • Boston Massacre
  • C3 Framework
  • Inquiry Design Model
  • Wa-social-studies
  • Washington
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    Grade 5 Inquiry: The Boston Massacre. What Really Happened?

    Grade 5 Inquiry: The Boston Massacre. What Really Happened?

    Overview

    This inquiry by Amy Johnson, Longview Public Schools, is based on the C3 Framework inquiry arc. The students will highlight the two primary sources then reflect. They will then do the Open Mind activity illustrating both points of view they learned from the primary sources, develop a three-event timeline and create a newspaper front page describing “What really happened March 5, 1770.”

    What really happened on March 5th, 1770?

    Supporting Question

    1. How did the colonists and British soldiers see the events of the Boston Massacre differently?

    Inquiry Description

    The students will highlight the two primary sources then reflect. They will then do the Open Mind activity illustrating both points of view they learned from the primary sources, develop a three-event timeline and create a newspaper front page describing “What really happened March 5, 1770.”

    Structure

    Day 1

    Students will examine “The Bloody Massacre” image by Paul Revere and the “Boston Massacre” image by Alonzo Chappel. In teams, students will compare and contrast the images listing the things that are the same and different. Teams will report out and share what they discovered.

    Next students will look at the primary source documents representing two points of view. Students will get their primary documents and highlighters. They will be given time to look at the documents and pictures. Before beginning the highlighting activity, they can ask questions about their documents. They will read silently both documents highlighting words and phrases that are “powerful” and words they are “curious” about.

    After additional reading and discussion, students respond to the question, “Who is to blame in this document and image?” Students will do this for both primary source documents and images.

    Day 2:

    Students read their timelines and highlight three events they feel strongly about that led to the conflict, March 5th, 1770. When they have chosen, students will illustrate what happened based on the evidence in their Open Mind Graphic organizer. Next, they will then create a newspaper front page using true events from their timelines.

    Attribution and License

    Attribution

    Cover photo by Alonzo Chappel, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

    License

    CC BY license logo
    Except where otherwise noted, original work in this inquiry by Amy Johnson, Longview Public Schools is available under a Creative Commons Attribution License. All logos and trademarks are property of their respective owners. Sections used under fair use doctrine (17 U.S.C. § 107) are marked.

    This resource may contain links to websites operated by third parties. These links are provided for your convenience only and do not constitute or imply any endorsement or monitoring.