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Abraham Lincoln Movie Trailer Compare and Contrast
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Students will be able to analyze two theatrical movie trailers for movies pertaining to the life of Abraham Lincoln, identifying factual and dramatized components and attempt to find connections between the two trailers.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
05/11/2017
American History to 1865, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Civil War - Beginning Level
Read the Fine Print
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Decide whether you want to cover this material in two on Abraham Lincoln prior to introducing the Civil War,
or three class sessions. This lesson covers background so that the students are familiar with concepts such as
on the Civil War, including the state of the nation slavery and freedom. The readings and pictures should
leading up to the war, the causes, and the impact on the help the students understand the new vocabulary. As with
nation. There are eight Civics Test items related to this the other history lessons, the goal for the students is to
topic, so the material covered is somewhat dense for a comprehend and answer the Civics Test items correctly,
beginner class. Covers civics test items 48, 60, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, and 76.

Subject:
Education
History
Language Education (ESL)
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Provider Set:
Beginning Level Lesson Plans
Date Added:
09/04/2015
The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War, from the 1840s to 1877. The primary goal of the course is to understand the multiple meanings of a transforming event in American history. Those meanings may be defined in many ways: national, sectional, racial, constitutional, individual, social, intellectual, or moral. Four broad themes are closely examined: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problem, personal experience, and social process; the experience of modern, total war for individuals and society; and the political and social challenges of Reconstruction.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
David Blight
Date Added:
02/16/2011
English Language Arts, Grade 12
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CC BY-NC
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The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Lincoln Speaks to Americans
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CC BY-NC
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In this short unit, students will spend three lessons exploring some of Abraham Lincoln's speeches. Students will explore Lincoln's themes and consider how they address the issues of his time, and they'll analyze the literary and rhetorical devices he used to express his ideas.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait
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CC BY-NC
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This project unit—a multimedia self-portrait published in digital form—is the capstone of your students' high school careers. It is a chance for them to pause and reflect on where they've been, where they're going, and who they are as a person. Students will reflect on what they want others to know about them: what they want their message to be and what types of media they might use to convey that message. Students will have the opportunity to express themselves in many different formats—through writing, of course, but also through other media of their choosing. Students will be able to convey your message through visual art, photography, a graphic novel, audio, poetry, or video—practically any type of media they want!

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students will complete a multimedia self-portrait, capturing important aspects of the essence of themselves.
Students will contribute one chapter from their multimedia self-portrait to a class anthology.
Students will present one chapter from their multimedia self-portrait to the class.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How is late adolescence a moment of internal and external change?
What are the most important qualities of your character—past, present, and future?
How can you portray these key aspects of yourself using multimedia?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait, Publication and Celebration, Classroom Presentations
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CC BY-NC
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Congratulations! Students have finished and published their final project. Now they will begin to share and present the chapter they included in the class anthology. As their classmates share, they should note what in the presentations stands out. What made a strong impression?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait, Publication and Celebration, Reviewing Common Themes
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CC BY-NC
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The class will finish the presentations. What new things about the students did the presentations teach them? Were there common themes students noticed in all of the presentations? Did those themes help them draw conclusions about the experience of being a teenager?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to compare and explore the relationships between Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Adena Barnette
Albert Robinson
Date Added:
10/20/2015
The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This unit has been developed to guide students and instructors in a close reading of Lincoln’s “Gettysburg Address.” The activities and actions described below follow a carefully developed set of steps that assist students in increasing their familiarity and understanding of Lincoln’s speech through a series of text dependent tasks and questions that ultimately develop college and career ready skills identified in the Common Core State Standards.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Student Achievement Partners
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Horace Greeley to Abraham Lincoln, August 20, 1862, Excerpts
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Lincoln, Abraham. Abraham Lincoln papers: Series 2. General Correspondence. -1864: Horace Greeley to Abraham Lincoln, August 1, 1862 Clipping of Letter; endorsed by Lincoln. August 1, 1862.Manuscript/Mixed Material. https://www.loc.gov/item/mal4233500/.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Susan Jennings
Linda Coslett
Nancy Schurr
Christopher Gilliland
Date Added:
02/03/2022
Life in a Box
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CC BY-NC
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Students will use their knowledge and understanding of the lives and contributions of Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln with focus on the Civil War era by reconstructing key aspects of their lives that connect them to the Civil War.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
02/24/2023
Lincoln Letters: Personal Correspondence Classroom Activity
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CC BY-ND
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In this lesson, students will examine the collection of letters sent to President Abraham Lincoln from citizens contained in the Wayne State University Digital Collection, The Lincoln Letters. The students will read and analyze the letters to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by President Lincoln separate from the ongoing Civil War. Across a series of activities and tasks, the students will develop an argument on the importance of politics and favors in the Lincoln administration and culminate the lesson by creating an essay summarizing their evidence and argument.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Higher Education
History
Political Science
Reading Informational Text
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
George Zedan
Wayne State University Libraries
Date Added:
10/16/2018
Lincoln's Last Warning
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This Political Cartoon, published in Harper's Weekly in October 1862, shortly after the Battle of Antietam, summarizes the idea behind the Emancipation Proclamation. In it an axe-wielding President Lincoln threatens to cut down the tree a Confederate Soldier is using as refuge. Labeled "Slavery," the tree/soldier relationship in the cartoon is meant to convey the idea that slavery in the south was supporting the Confederate war effort - note also the poor state the Southern soldier appears to be in, shoeless and ragged (one Maryland resident who observed the invading Confederate army described them as "scarecrows"). Lincoln sought to frame the Emancipation of slaves as a "fit and necessary war measure for suppressing [the] rebellion," arguing that ending slavery in the south would deprive the Confederate army of the Home Front labor support slaves provided, thus ending the war quicker. The comic is specifically about the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation (issued at the end of Sept, 1862), which was a warning to the South that if they did not cease their rebellion before January 1, 1863, he would pass the formal Emancipation Proclamation - hence the title "Lincoln's Last Warning."

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Harper's Weekly
Date Added:
03/16/2018
Lincoln's Song (There's A Murderer On Horseback)
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Video and Song memorial to Lincoln's assassination. Epic and powerful. The "Edmund Fitzgerald" of Lincoln's assassination.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Education
English Language Arts
Higher Education
History
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Homework/Assignment
Primary Source
Author:
David Kirby
Date Added:
03/29/2018
Media Construction of Presidential Campaigns
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This curriculum kit helps to teach about the role of media in 28 U.S. elections ranging from 1800-2008. Over 160 media documents are included for decoding, including slides of posters, handbills and political cartoons; audio clips of songs and radio programs; and video clips of speeches, debates, comedy TV and political commercials. Students will learn how to analyze historical documents, the history of presidential campaigns, the crafting and marketing of campaign messages, and the impact of new technologies and new media on presidential campaigns.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry & Chris Sperry
Date Added:
03/25/2013
Primary Sources for Civil War and Reconstruction
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

2 articles written by Frederick DouglassFrederick Douglass, “What Shall Be Done with the Slaves if Emancipated?” Douglass Monthly, January 1862Frederick Douglass, “Why Should a Colored Man Enlist?” Douglass’ Monthly, April 1863Letter from James Henry Gooding to President LincolnJames Henry Gooding to President Lincoln, September 28, 1863, published in Herbert Aptheker, ed., A Documentary History of the Negro People in the United States (New York: Citadel Press, 1951), 482-84.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Susan Jennings
Christopher Gilliland
Nancy Schurr
Linda Coslett
Date Added:
02/03/2022