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AEM Center: K-12 Critical Components of the Quality Indicators for the Provision of Accessible Educational Materials & Accessible Technologies
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The purpose of the National AEM Center’s Quality Indicators with Critical Components for K-12 is to assist state and local education agencies with planning, implementing, and evaluating systems for providing accessible materials and technologies for all students who need them. States and local school districts will find the Quality Indicators useful for implementing statutory requirements that mandate equitable access to learning opportunities for students with disabilities, including equal access to printed materials, digital materials, and technologies.

Subject:
Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
CAST
Date Added:
08/11/2022
AT Policies and best Practices
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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In this module we will provide a comprehensive description of the legal landscape of the assistive technology locally and on an international level as well as best practices.

Subject:
Applied Science
Law
Technology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Mada Center
Date Added:
11/28/2023
Acquiring Accessible Formats
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Acquiring the accessible formats a learner needs is part of a multi-step decision-making process. By prioritizing accessibility, access barriers for learners with disabilities will be minimized when materials are acquired. In cases where inaccessible materials have been selected, alternative forms - accessible formats - of those materials will have to be acquired for learners who need them. Examples of accessible formats include audio, braille, large print, tactile graphics, and digital text conforming with accessibility standards.

Accessible formats of materials can be acquired from:

Accessible Media Producers (AMPs)
Publishers
Local Conversion

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
CAST
Date Added:
08/11/2022
An Arm and a Leg
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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As an introduction to bioengineering, student teams are given the engineering challenge to design and build prototype artificial limbs using a simple syringe system and limited resources. As part of a NASA lunar mission scenario, they determine which substance, water (liquid) or air (gas), makes the appendages more efficient.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
09/18/2014
An Assistive Artistic Device
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students design and develop a useful assistive device for people challenged by fine motor skill development who cannot grasp and control objects. In the process of designing prototype devices, they learn about the engineering design process and how to use it to solve problems. After an introduction about the effects of disabilities and the importance of hand and finger dexterity, student pairs research, brainstorm, plan, budget, compare, select, prototype, test, evaluate and modify their design ideas to create devices that enable a student to hold and use a small paintbrush or crayon. The design challenge includes clearly identified criteria and constraints, to which teams rate their competing design solutions. Prototype testing includes independent evaluations by three classmates, after which students redesign to make improvements. To conclude, teams make one-slide presentations to the class to recap their design projects. This activity incorporates a 3D modeling and 3D printing component as students generate prototypes of their designs. However, if no 3D printer is available, the project can be modified to use traditional and/or simpler fabrication processes and basic materials.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Kristen Billiar
Terri Camesano
Thomas Oliva
Date Added:
02/07/2017
Assistive Technology in the Schools:  Assistive Technology Assessment
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this module, we will explore how Individual Education Plan (IEP) teams can assess if assistive technology is required to reduce or remove learning barriers for students with a disability.  In the past, IEP teams have looked to specialists as experts to conduct an assistive technology assessment for their students. However, the IEP team is the best expert on their student. It is best practice for the IEP to conduct an AT assessment on their students, with each team member contributing in the area of the assessment that aligns with their expertise.  In this module, we will share the steps necessary for an assistive technology assessment, as well as resources and tools that will help the IEP team make data-informed decisions.  Assessment ideas for common types of assistive technology tools will be discussed, such as tools for reading, writing, and math.  In addition, resources will be shared for AT assessments that involve AT for vision, hearing, motor, and communication.  We will also share WA State support agencies who exist to guide IEP teams during the AT assessment process.  

Subject:
Early Childhood Development
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
SETC CWU
Linda Doehle
Dan Herlihy
Rose Racicot
Date Added:
03/03/2023
Automatic Floor Cleaner Computer Program Challenge
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students learn more about assistive devices, specifically biomedical engineering applied to computer engineering concepts, with an engineering challenge to create an automatic floor cleaner computer program. Following the steps of the design process, they design computer programs and test them by programming a simulated robot vacuum cleaner (a LEGO® robot) to move in designated patterns. Successful programs meet all the design requirements.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jared R. Quinn
Kristen Billiar
Terri Camesano
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Design a Carrying Device for People Using Crutches
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students are given a biomedical engineering challenge, which they solve while following the steps of the engineering design process. In a design lab environment, student groups design, create and test prototype devices that help people using crutches carry things, such as books and school supplies. The assistive devices must meet a list of constraints, including a device weight limit and minimum load capacity. Students use various hand and power tools to fabricate the devices. They test the practicality of their designs by loading them with objects and then using the modified crutches in the school hallways and classrooms.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Kristen Billiar
Terri Camesano
Thomas Oliva
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Early Childhood Critical Components of the Quality Indicators for the Provision of Accessible Educational Materials & Accessible Technologies
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In inclusive early childhood programs and settings, social and learning activities are designed for the participation of all children. Objects, tools, and materials that are selected for inclusive activities provide options for engaging through multiple sensory, physical, and perceptual means. The Quality Indicators for Early Childhood describe how agencies, programs, and services can work together to improve the accessibility of early learning environments for children with disabilities.

Subject:
Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
CAST
Date Added:
08/11/2022
Engineering and Empathy: Teaching the Engineering Design Process through Assistive Devices
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students follow the steps of the engineering design process (EDP) while learning about assistive devices and biomedical engineering. They first go through a design-build-test activity to learn the steps of the cyclical engineering design process. Then, during the three main activities (7 x 55 minutes each) student teams are given a fictional client statement and follow the EDP steps to design products an off-road wheelchair, a portable wheelchair ramp, and an automatic floor sweeper computer program. Students brainstorm ideas, identify suitable materials and demonstrate different methods of representing solutions to their design problems scale drawings or programming descriptions, and simple models or classroom prototypes.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jared R. Quinn
Kristen Billiar
Terri Camesano
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Ethical Use of Technology in Digital Learning Environments: Graduate Student Perspectives
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Short Description:
This book is the result of a co-design project in a class in the Masters of Education program at the University of Calgary. The course, and the resulting book, focus primarily on the safe and ethical use of technology in digital learning environments. The course was organized according to four topics based on Farrow’s (2016) Framework for the Ethics of Open Education.This is the first of 2 Versions of this pressbook. Click on Volume 2 for information.

Long Description:
This book is the result of a co-design project in a class in the Masters of Education program at the University of Calgary. The course, and the resulting book, focus primarily on the safe and ethical use of technology in digital learning environments. The course was organized according to four topics based on Farrow’s (2016) Framework for the Ethics of Open Education. Students were asked to review, analyze, and synthesize each topic from three meta-ethical theoretical positions: deontological, consequentialist, and virtue ethical (Farrow, 2016). The chapters in this open educational resource (OER) were co-designed using a participatory pedagogy with the intention to share and mobilize knowledge with a broader audience. The first three chapters in the book discuss specific ethical considerations related to technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) , social networking services (SNS), and 3D printing. The next four chapters shift to a broader discussion of resource sharing, adaptive learning systems, STEM, and assistive technologies. The final two chapters discuss admissions and communications that need to be considered from an institutional perspective. In each of the nine chapters, the authors discuss the connection to the value of technology in education, and practical possibilities of learning technologies for inclusive, participatory, democratic, and pluralistic educational paradigms.

Word Count: 56853

ISBN: 0-88953-438-1

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Communication
Computer Science
Education
Higher Education
Philosophy
Special Education
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Calgary
Author:
Barbara Brown
Michele Jacobsen
Verena Roberts
Date Added:
12/28/2020
Ethical Use of Technology in Digital Learning Environments: Graduate Student Perspectives, Volume 2
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

Short Description:
This book is the result of a co-design project in a class in the Masters of Education program at the University of Calgary. The course, and the resulting book, focus primarily on the safe and ethical use of technology in digital learning environments. The course was organized according to four topics based on Farrow’s (2016) Framework for the Ethics of Open Education.

Long Description:
Click on Volume 1 to read the first book in this series.

This book is the result of a co-design project in a class in the Masters of Education program at the University of Calgary. The course, and the resulting book, focus primarily on the safe and ethical use of technology in digital learning environments, and is the second volume in the series. The course was organized according to four topics based on Farrow’s (2016) Framework for the Ethics of Open Education. Students were asked to review, analyze, and synthesize each topic from three meta-ethical theoretical positions: deontological, consequentialist, and virtue ethical (Farrow, 2016). The chapters in this open educational resource (OER) were co-designed using a participatory pedagogy with the intention to share and mobilize knowledge with a broader audience. The first section, comprised of four chapters, focuses on topics relating to well-being in technology-enabled learning environments, including the use of web cameras, eproctoring software, video games, and access to broadband connectivity. The second section focuses on privacy and autonomy of learners and citizens in a variety of contexts from schools to clinical settings. In each of the seven chapters, the authors discuss the connection to the value of technology in education, and practical possibilities of learning technologies for inclusive, participatory, democratic, and pluralistic educational paradigms. The book concludes with reflections from the course instructor gained over two iterations of teaching the course.

Word Count: 40312

ISBN: 978-0-88953-472-8

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Communication
Computer Science
Education
Higher Education
Philosophy
Special Education
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Calgary
Author:
Christie Hurrell
David Luinstra
Dr Barbara Brown Dr Verena Roberts Dr Michele Jacobsen Christie Hurrell Nicole Neutzling Mia Travers-hayward
Dr Michele Jacobsen
Dr Verena Roberts
Lindsay Humphreys
Mia Travers-hayward
Michael Maciach
Nicole Neutzling
Rob Hendrickson
Date Added:
12/23/2021
Framing the Future of Learning with Technology
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Framing the Future of Learning with Technology
The goal of the Center on Inclusive Technology & Education Systems (CITES) is to empower school districts to create and sustain inclusive technology systems that serve all students, including students with disabilities who require assistive technology or accessible educational materials. To do this work, we are creating and disseminating a framework of evidence-based practices to enhance the successful use of technology by all students. We provide technical assistance to districts, educators, and families to ensure that students with disabilities are able to use the technology tools they need to foster learning and life success.

Subject:
Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Center on Inclusive Technology and Education System
CAST
Date Added:
08/15/2022
ICT-AID Competency Framework
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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The main objective of the MADA ICT-AID competency framework is to provide the community with a framework that can be used as a template to assist educational institutions, organizations and individuals in delimiting the required relevant competencies in the ICT accessibility and inclusive design field. This framework can help in creating learning resources and teaching materials on ICT accessibility and inclusive design, and also to make other courses accessible.

Subject:
Special Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Syllabus
Author:
Mohamed Koutheair Khribi
Date Added:
10/19/2021