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African American Soldiers in World War I
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the experiences of African American Soldiers in World War I. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Anti-Racism Activity: 'The Sneetches'
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Before conducting this activity, educators may want to discuss historical information about racism and diversity issues. In the story The Sneetches, written by Dr. Seuss, yellow bird-like creatures take students on an adventure where green stars become the symbol of discrimination and privilege. After reading the story aloud, let students participate in the following activities that can be adapted with or without the story.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
11/28/2016
Asian American Voices in Politics
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The lesson focuses on the first Asian Americans to run for Congress - Patsy Mink and Daniel Inouye - who paved the way for future generations of Asian Americans to be politically active.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 7.5, 8.2, 8.7, 8.8, HS.2, HS.6, HS.9, HS.11
Historical Knowledge: 8.25, 8.27, HS.52, HS.60, HS.64, HS.65, HS.66
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.31, 8.32, HS.67, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 7.27, 7.29, 8.33, 8.36, HS.72, H.73, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
Black Matters: Introduction to Black Studies
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Interdisciplinary survey of people of African descent that draws on the overlapping approaches of history, literature, anthropology, legal studies, media studies, performance, linguistics, and creative writing. This course connects the experiences of African-Americans and of other American minorities, focusing on social, political, and cultural histories, and on linguistic patterns.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Literature
Philosophy
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
DeGraff, Michel
Date Added:
02/01/2017
Challenging the Boy Scouts of America's Anti-Gay Policy
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Student readings examine the Boy Scouts of America's policy of excluding gays, as well as efforts by scouts themselves to challenge discrimination from both inside and outside the organization.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Mark Engler
Date Added:
12/14/2012
Child Prisoner in American Concentration Camps: A Memoir Study
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CC BY-NC
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Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages has developed lessons, supplemental resources, and educational documentary videos to accompany the memoir Child Prisoner in American Concentration Camps by Mako Nakagawa.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
08/08/2023
Chinese Massacre of 1871 – Connecting the Past with the Present
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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In this lesson, students will learn about the Los Angeles Chinatown Massacre of 1871. They will examine the attitudes and policies of the time which led to the Massacre. Students will learn about recent acts of anti-Asian violence and make connections between the Chinese Massacre and recent anti-Asian violence and attacks.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 3.2
Economics: 4.4
Historical Knowledge: 5.22
Historical Thinking: 4.19, 5.24
Social Science Analysis: 3.17, 3.18, 4.21, 4.24, 5.27, 5.28, 5.29

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
01/24/2023
Chinese Massacre of 1871: Not an Isolated Event
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this lesson, students will learn about the Los Angeles Chinese Massacre of 1871, and identify the causes by examining the attitudes and policies of the time. They will learn about and analyze other massacres that have occurred in the United States in order to gain a better and more nuanced understanding of how and why these acts of violence occur. Lastly, students will research the process for reparations and consider how to address and rectify the harm of such injustices.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: HS.2, HS.9
Geography: HS.42, HS.51
Historical Knowledge: 6.20, 6.21, 8,22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.53, HS.64, HS.65
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.30, 8.31, HS.67, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 6.24, 6.26, 6.27, 6.28, 7.27, 7.28, 7.29, 7.30, 8.33, 8.34, 8.36, HS.71, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74, HS.75

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
The Civil Rights Movement
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In 1948, President Harry Truman took an early step towards civil rights reform by issuing Executive Order 9981, which eliminated racial segregation in the military. After World War II, African Americans ? then often called Negroes or "coloreds," began to mobilize against discrimination. They demanded an end to segregation and fought for equality in education, housing, and employment opportunities. The images in this topic show that by the 1960s, their struggle ? which began in the segregated South ? had reached California. As a number of photographs in this topic show, many Californians showed their support for Civil Rights activists and victims of racial discrimination in the South by holding marches, rallies, and demonstrations urging equality for African Americans. In one image three white children in San Francisco hold a sign in support of the four young black girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Photographs also show people in San Francisco boycotting Kress and Woolworth's department stores, sites of racial discrimination in the South. Documents shown here include a flyer urging the boycott of the stores; and a Western Union telegram sent in 1963, stating that Civil Rights activists Roy Wilkins and Medgar Evers were arrested attempting to picket Woolworth's in Jackson, Mississippi. Two photographs of memorials for slain civil rights leaders ? a march in honor Medgar Evers in 1963, in Los Angeles, and a memorial in the San Francisco Bay Area for Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968 ? show racially mixed crowds in attendance. But not all Californians sympathized with the Civil Rights movement. Images of racial hatred and prejudice are reflected in the photograph of an African American woman holding a rock that had been thrown through an office window, and Klu Klux Klan graffiti spray-painted on a home. Various groups formed to fight in the struggle for equal rights. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), formed in 1909, entered a new phase during this period, leading in the organized struggle for civil rights. An example of how the NAACP communicated about events is reflected in a letter from the Alameda County branch of the NAACP on June 13, 1950, which reported segregation on the Southern Pacific Railroad trains leaving Los Angeles. A flyer promoting the boycott of California grapes exemplifies NAACP support for other rights movements, in this case the United Farm Workers. Other flyers urged Californians to fight sharecropper wages and "Keep Mississippi Out of California." Groups such as the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and student groups also protested segregation and incidents of racial discrimination in the South. Several important African American leaders ? including Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, and Ralph Abernathy ? all came to California, as documented by photographs included here. Sometimes, the price of fighting for social justice was high. Two images capture events held for leaders in the social justice movement who were assassinated: the 1963 memorial march in Los Angeles for civil rights leader Medgar Evers; and a crowd attending a Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Rally in honor of the slain civil rights leader.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Constitutional Rights of American Citizens
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The incarceration of Japanese Americans in World War II was a grave failure of our democracy and highlights the dangers that can result when the three branches of government failed to uphold the Constitution, and certain communities are excluded from political power. Until the 1950s, Asian Americans were not allowed to become naturalized citizens and did not have the power to vote or engage in many of America’s political processes. In this lesson, students will investigate how citizenship and voting rights have evolved throughout history and reflect critically on how the rights and privileges conferred by citizenship impact political power on both an individual and community level.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 8.2, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7, 8.8, HS.1, HS.2, HS.6, HS.9
Historical Knowledge: HS.53, HS.65
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.30, 8.31, HS.67, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 7.27, 7.29, 8.33, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74, HS.77, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
Current Events and Social Issues
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from around the world.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gold, Claudia
Perlman, Lee
Rodal, Jocelyn
Date Added:
09/01/2004
Discrimination vs. Prejudice
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This lesson is designed for middle school students (6th-8th grade) to understand the difference between discrimination and prejudice. In this lesson, students will learn the definitions of the two concepts with associated examples as well. Lastly, the lesson has a slide on the actions people need to take to eliminate these concepts from our society.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Jonathan Dolson
Date Added:
10/24/2022
Discrimination vs. Prejudice
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is designed for middle school students (6th-8th grade) to understand the difference between discrimination and prejudice. In this lesson, students will learn the definitions of the two concepts with associated examples as well. Lastly, the lesson has a slide on the actions people need to take to eliminate these concepts from our society.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Jonathan Dolson
Date Added:
10/24/2022
Early Chinese Immigration to the US
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore early Chinese immigration to the United States. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Hillary Brady
Date Added:
10/20/2015
Echoes and Reflections: History of Antisemitism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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These lessons are provided by Echoes and Reflections. The lessons come from a new book, "Teaching the Holocaust By Inquiry" by Beth Krasemann. The book is scheduled for release at the end of May 2022.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
09/10/2023
Economic History
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
History
Social Science
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hornbeck, Richard
Date Added:
02/01/2009
Every Student Belongs: Stereotypes and Scapegoating
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Grade Level: Middle - High SchoolLength of Lesson: Two 90 minute block periods, Four 50-55 minute block periodsEssential QuestionsIn what ways do “single stories” impact our own identities, how we view others, and the choices we make?How do stereotypes influence how we view and treat others?How, when, and why do stereotyping and scapegoating escalate to discrimination, prejudice, and violence?What are different ways people can combat stereotypes and scapegoating?

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
09/08/2021
Every Student Belongs: Understanding White Supremacy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Since this lesson focuses on white supremacy which targets Jews, African Americans and other groups, it is important to be mindful that seeing and discussing the topic could be upsetting for some or many of your students. Some students may feel comfortable or interested in discussing these issues in class and others may feel nervous, uncomfortable or angry talking about this topic. Prior to teaching the lesson, assess the maturity of your students in being able to handle this challenging content, review your classroom guidelines for establishing a safe learning environment and provide opportunities for students to share their feelings as the lesson proceeds.]LEARNING OBJECTIVES  Students will understand what white supremacy is, its history and how it manifests in modern society.  Students will learn more about the alt right and how it has grown in recent  Students will reflect upon white supremacy and the alt right through a writingassignment.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Fannie Lou Hamer and the Civil Rights Movement in Rural Mississippi
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Fannie Lou Hamer and the civil rights movement in rural Mississippi. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Gender Issues in Academics and Academia
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Does it matter in education whether or not you've got a Y chromosome? You bet it does. In this discussion-based seminar, we will explore why males vastly outrank females in math and science and career advancements (particularly in academia), and why girls get better grades and go to college more often than boys. Do the sexes have different learning styles? Are women denied advanced opportunities in academia and the workforce? How do family life and family decisions affect careers for both men and women?

Subject:
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jacobs, Kayla
Ruhlen, Laurel
Sweet, Holly
Date Added:
02/01/2004