Updating search results...

Search Resources

24 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • frederick-douglass
African American Perspectives: Materials Selected from the Rare Book Collection
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

"African American Perspectives" gives a panoramic and eclectic review of African American history and culture and is primarily comprised of two collections in the Rare Book and Special Collections Division: the African American Pamphlet Collection and the Daniel A.P. Murray Collection with a date range of 1822 through 1909. Most were written by African-American authors, though some were written by others on topics of particular importance in African-American history. Among the authors represented are Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Benjamin W. Arnett, Alexander Crummel, Emanuel Love, Lydia Maria Child, Kelly Miller, Charles Sumner, Mary Church Terrell, and Booker T. Washington, among others.

The 800 + titles in the collection include sermons on racial pride and political activism; annual reports of charitable, educational, and political organizations; and college catalogs and graduation orations from the Hampton Institute, Morgan College, and Wilberforce University. Also included are biographies, slave narratives, speeches by members of Congress, legal documents, poetry, playbills, dramas, and librettos. Other materials focus on segregation, voting rights, violence against African Americans, the colonization of Africa by freed slaves, anti-slavery organizations and investigative reports. Several of the items are illustrated with portraits of the authors.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
11/30/2004
American Classics
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This subject is devoted to reading and discussing basic American historical texts that are often cited but often remain unread, understanding their meaning, and assessing their continuing significance in American culture. Since it is a “Communications Intensive” subject, 21H.105 is also dedicated to improving students’ capacities to write and speak well. It requires a substantial amount of writing, participation in discussions, and individual presentations to the class.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
02/01/2006
American History to 1865
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
09/01/2010
American History to 1865, Fall 2010
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course provides a basic history of American social, economic, and political development from the colonial period through the Civil War. It examines the colonial heritages of Spanish and British America; the American Revolution and its impact; the establishment and growth of the new nation; and the Civil War, its background, character, and impact. Readings include writings of the period by J. Winthrop, T. Paine, T. Jefferson, J. Madison, W. H. Garrison, G. Fitzhugh, H. B. Stowe, and A. Lincoln.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Maier, Pauline
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Comparing Portrayals of Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Photography and Literature
Read the Fine Print
Some Rights Reserved
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students analyze similarities and differences among depictions of slavery in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn", Frederick Douglass' "Narrative", and nineteenth century photographs of slaves. Students formulate their analysis of the role of art and fiction, as they attempt to reliably reflect social ills, in a final essay.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/28/2013
Douglass, Frederick. "Emancipation Proclaimed."
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Douglass, Frederick. "Emancipation Proclaimed." Frederick Douglass Project Writings- University of Rochester. 1862, https://rbscp.lib.rochester.edu/4406Description: Stephen Douglass reacts to the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Susan Jennings
Christopher Gilliland
Nancy Schurr
Linda Coslett
Date Added:
02/03/2022
Experiments On The Tight Rope
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A figurative portrayal of Whig candidate Winfield Scott's failure in the 1852 presidential contest, attributed by the artist to his alliance with abolitionist interests. Scott is hoisted aloft via a pulley system by various influential supporters, including (left to right): an unidentified man, New York "Times" editor Henry J. Raymond, black abolitionist Frederick Douglass, Boston editor and abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, Pennsylvania representative David Wilmot, and New York senator William Seward. They try to haul him up to the "President's Chair," which sits on a gallows-like structure, but the rope snaps owing to the "Free Soil" and "Abolition" weights chained to Scott's waist. Scott's supporters fall in unison to the left. Raymond: "You might have known them cussed weights would break the rope!" Seward:"Thus the noble Cesar fell, and you and I & all of us fell down and bloody Locofocoism flourished over us!" Scott (falling): "It may be the effect of my imagination, but it certainly feels as if something has given way!" At left, New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley rides a swaybacked horse carrying a "Tariff" bundle. He shouts to Scott, "Hold on General where you are just one minute till I come to help you!" Another man runs after Greeley crying, "Whoa! whoa! I say Greely don't ride that poor old nag to death!" Entering from the right-hand corner are a black man and his wife. The wife points at Scott and says, "Law! Mr. Cesar it seems to me dat de Gemman is gevine de wrong way."|Pubd. by John Childs, 84 Nassau St. N. York.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 205.|Weitenkampf, p. 108-109.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-31.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Frederick Douglass Papers, 1841-1964
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress presents the papers of the nineteenth-century African-American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his own freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer, and publisher. The papers span the years 1841 to 1964, with the bulk of the material from 1862 to 1895. The printed Speech, Article, and Book Series contains the writings of Douglass and contemporaries in the abolitionist and early women's rights movements.The Subject File Series reveals Douglass's interest in diverse subjects such as politics, emancipation, racial prejudice, women's suffrage, and prison reform. Scrapbooks document Douglass's role as minister to Haiti and the controversy surrounding his interracial second marriage.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
05/13/2013
Frederick Douglass, "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro" Speech, July 4, 1852, Rochester, New York.
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Douglass, Frederick. "The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro"Speech, Rochester, NY, July4, 1852. Independence Hall Association (ushistory.org). https://www.ushistory.org/declaration/more/douglass.htmlDescription: Douglass' address to a predominantly white audience regarding the celebration of the Fourth of July by African Americans

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Susan Jennings
Christopher Gilliland
Linda Coslett
Nancy Schurr
Date Added:
02/03/2022
Frederick Douglass "What to the Slave..."
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In addition to making historical points about nineteenth-century attitudes toward slavery, race, and abolition, you can use this speech to teach formal rhetoric. We have divided the address into four sections according to the function of each one. This division follows the classic structure of argumentative writing:

paragraphs 1–3: introduction (exordium)
paragraphs 4–29: narrative or statement of fact (narratio)
paragraphs 30–70: arguments and counter-arguments (confirmatio and refutatio)
paragraph 71: conclusion (peroratio)
We have included notes that explain the function of each section as well as questions that invite discussion of the ways in which Douglass deploys rhetoric to make his case.

This lesson features five interactive activities, which can be accessed by clicking on this icon . The first explores the subtle way in which Douglass compares the patriots of 1776 with the abolitionists of 1852. The second challenges students to determine how Douglass supports his thesis. The third focuses on his use of syllogistic reasoning, while the fourth examines how he makes his case through emotion and the fifth through analogy.

We recommend assigning the entire text . For close reading we have analyzed eighteen of the speech’s seventy-one paragraphs through fine-grained questions, most of them text-dependent, that will enable students to explore rhetorical strategies and significant themes. The version below, designed for teachers, provides responses to those questions in the “Text Analysis” section. The classroom version , a printable worksheet for use with students, omits those responses and this “Teaching the Text” note. Terms that appear in blue are defined on hover and in a printable glossary on the last page of the classroom version. The student worksheet also includes links to the activities, indicated by this icon .

This is a long lesson. We recommend dividing students into groups and assigning each group a set of paragraphs to analyze.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
James Engell
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
05/03/2019
Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This collection uses primary sources to compare and explore the relationships between Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Adena Barnette
Albert Robinson
Date Added:
10/20/2015
The Fugitive's Song
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

A sheet music cover illustrated with a portrait of prominent black abolitionist Frederick Douglass as a runaway slave. Douglass flees barefoot from two mounted pursuers who appear across the river behind him with their pack of dogs. Ahead, to the right, a signpost points toward New England. The cover's text states that "The Fugitive's Song" was "composed and respectfully dedicated, in token of confident esteem to Frederick Douglass. A graduate from the peculiar institution. For his fearless advocacy, signal ability and wonderful success in behalf of his brothers in bonds. (and to the fugitives from slavery in the) free states & Canadas by their friend Jesse Hutchinson Junr." As the illustration suggests, Douglass himself had escaped from slavery, fleeing in 1838 from Maryland to Massachusetts. He achieved considerable renown for his autobiography "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass," first published in 1845. The Library's copy of "The Fugitive's Song" was deposited for copyright on July 23, 1845. An earlier abolitionist song composed by Hutchinson, "Get Off the Track!" (no. 1844-14), also used a cover illustration to amplify its message.|Boston. Published by Henry Prentiss 33 Court St.|Entered . . . 1845 by Henry Prentiss.|Lith. of E.W. Bouve Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1845-7.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Grade 4: Unit 1- Actions Speak Louder Than Words: Lesson 1 REMIX
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson opens the unit and prepares learners for the structure of the instructional routines. The anchor text for this lesson is, Words Set Me Free by Lesa Cline-Ransome. This literary nonfiction text chronicles the story of Frederick Douglass' early life and includes events that influenced both his life and those of others. The students should listen for examples of how actions speak louder than words. The initial read will allow students an opportunity to comprehend on a literal level. The subsequent readings provide opportunities for students to analyze and interpret figurative language throughout the book. Specifically, the students will identify how similes and metaphors enhance the reader's understanding of the life of Frederick Douglass. Students will routinely write in a response log to demonstrate understanding of the theme of this unit, Actions Speak Louder than Words. In addition, students will use their knowledge of figurative language in their writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Shannon Copeland
Lauren Byrd
MSDE Admin
Jennifer Ralston
Date Added:
06/27/2018
Life in a Box
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Students will use their knowledge and understanding of the lives and contributions of Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Abraham Lincoln with focus on the Civil War era by reconstructing key aspects of their lives that connect them to the Civil War.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
02/24/2023
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Unit
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Throughout this unit on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, students practice the same six skills with greater scaffolding and modeling at the beginning, and more independence toward the middle and end. The tasks include: 1. writing to an essential question to access background knowledge; 2. using context clues and root words to determine word meaning; 3. close reading with the aid of a glossary; 4. taking notes one of two graphic organizers (sequence of events and/or empathy map); 5. re-reading to answer text dependent questions; and 6. summarizing the chapter.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Poetic Douglass Compilation Assignment
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Poetic Douglass is a fun way to read and engage in a text while still respecting the content of the material. It is part note taking, part creative expression, and the end result is a comprehensive class wide interpretation of the text.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Primary Source
Reading
Date Added:
09/15/2019
Primary Sources for Civil War and Reconstruction
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

2 articles written by Frederick DouglassFrederick Douglass, “What Shall Be Done with the Slaves if Emancipated?” Douglass Monthly, January 1862Frederick Douglass, “Why Should a Colored Man Enlist?” Douglass’ Monthly, April 1863Letter from James Henry Gooding to President LincolnJames Henry Gooding to President Lincoln, September 28, 1863, published in Herbert Aptheker, ed., A Documentary History of the Negro People in the United States (New York: Citadel Press, 1951), 482-84.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Susan Jennings
Christopher Gilliland
Nancy Schurr
Linda Coslett
Date Added:
02/03/2022
Slave Control in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

While reading The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, it is necessary to discusss the methods used to control slaves. The presentation provides students with related publications, evidence from the narrative, and discusses the effects of dehumanization. The activity linked in the presentation asks students to mirror the use of animal imagery found in both Douglass' narrative and Spiegelman's graphic novel series "Mauss."

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jenny Dawman
Date Added:
03/21/2018
Slavery: Acts of Resistance
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity students compare an excerpt of a WPA interview with an ex-slave with a more famous statement by Frederick Douglass to arrive at their own interpretations of slave resistance. This lesson is designed to work with the film Doing As They Can, but parts of it can be completed without the film.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
11/21/2019
Slavery in the United States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This is intended to provide primary and secondary sources to educators as they teach the history of slavery and famous abolitionists. This is an additional resource to help students understand the humanity of slaves as smart, creative, and talented individuals. This includes primary and secondary resources inclusing examples of architecture, artwork, music, and literature. 

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Author:
Dorothy Milligan
Date Added:
05/29/2024