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Advanced Analytic Methods in Geospatial Intelligence
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General James Clapper, former United States Director of National Intelligence and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), once said \everything happens somewhere.\" He stressed that there are aspects of time and place to every intelligence problem. In this course, you will examine how time and place work with general intelligence techniques to create geospatial intelligence. You will learn and apply critical thinking skills, structured analytical techniques, and other intelligence methods in a geospatial context. You'll also learn how to reduce personal and organizational bias by conducting an Analysis of Competing Hypotheses, by R. Heuer, a 45-year veteran of the CIA. As a result, you will be better prepared for the world of geospatial intelligence analysis."

Subject:
Applied Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Dennis Bellafiore
Todd Bacastow
Date Added:
10/07/2019
The Art of the Probable: Literature and Probability
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“The Art of the Probable” addresses the history of scientific ideas, in particular the emergence and development of mathematical probability. But it is neither meant to be a history of the exact sciences per se nor an annex to, say, the Course 6 curriculum in probability and statistics. Rather, our objective is to focus on the formal, thematic, and rhetorical features that imaginative literature shares with texts in the history of probability. These shared issues include (but are not limited to): the attempt to quantify or otherwise explain the presence of chance, risk, and contingency in everyday life; the deduction of causes for phenomena that are knowable only in their effects; and, above all, the question of what it means to think and act rationally in an uncertain world.
Our course therefore aims to broaden students’ appreciation for and understanding of how literature interacts with – both reflecting upon and contributing to – the scientific understanding of the world. We are just as centrally committed to encouraging students to regard imaginative literature as a unique contribution to knowledge in its own right, and to see literary works of art as objects that demand and richly repay close critical analysis. It is our hope that the course will serve students well if they elect to pursue further work in Literature or other discipline in SHASS, and also enrich or complement their understanding of probability and statistics in other scientific and engineering subjects they elect to take.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Mathematics
Reading Literature
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jackson, Noel
Kibel, Alvin
Raman, Shankar
Date Added:
02/01/2008
Brains, Minds and Machines Summer Course
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the problem of intelligence—its nature, how it is produced by the brain and how it could be replicated in machines—using an approach that integrates cognitive science, which studies the mind; neuroscience, which studies the brain; and computer science and artificial intelligence, which study the computations needed to develop intelligent machines. Materials are drawn from the Brains, Minds and Machines Summer Course offered annually at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA, taught by faculty affiliated with the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines headquartered at MIT. Elements of the summer course are integrated into the MIT course, 9.523 Aspects of a Computational Theory of Intelligence.
Contributors
This course includes the contributions of many instructors, guest speakers, and a team of iCub researchers. See the complete list of contributors.

Subject:
Applied Science
Biology
Career and Technical Education
Computer Science
Electronic Technology
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Physical Science
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kreiman, Gabriel
Poggio, Tomaso
Date Added:
06/01/2015
Cultural Intelligence
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CC BY-NC-SA
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GEOG 571 explores the relationships between culture and civil security and the process of geographically analyzing social, political, economic, and demographic information to understand human history, institutions, and behaviors. It is an elective course in the Geospatial Intelligence Certificate, the Intercollege Master of Professional Studies (iMPS-HLS), and the Master of Geographic Information Systems degree program that is offered exclusively through Penn State's World Campus. It is also one of the optional capstone courses that leads to Penn State's Postbaccalaureate Certificate in GIS. The course consists of projects, associated readings, and exams.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
George Van Otten
Date Added:
09/18/2018
Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts
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This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Graphic Arts
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Oxman, Neri
Yoon, Meejin
Date Added:
02/01/2013
Discover Psychology 2.0 - A Brief Introductory Text
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This textbook presents core concepts common to introductory courses. The 15 units cover the traditional areas of intro-to-psychology; ranging from biological aspects of psychology to psychological disorders to social psychology. This book can be modified: feel free to add or remove modules to better suit your specific needs.

This book includes a comprehensive instructor's manual, PowerPoint presentations, a test bank, reading anticipation guides, and adaptive student quizzes.

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Cara Laney
David M. Buss
David Watson
Edward Diener
Elizabeth F. Loftus
Emily Hooker
George Loewenstein
Henry L. Roediger III
Jeanne Tsai
Kathleen B. McDermott
Mark E. Bouton
Max H. Bazerman
Richard E. Lucas
Robert Siegler
Robert V. Levine
Ross Thompson
Sarah Pressman
Sudeep Bhatia
Susan T. Fiske
Yoshihisa Kashima
Date Added:
12/08/2016
Geographic Foundations of Geospatial Intelligence
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A good detective or researcher like Sherlock Holmes knows the fundamental questions that need to be answered to gather facts to solve a problem. So how does geospatial intelligence contribute to answering these questions? While geospatial technology is useful in revealing who, what, when, and where events take place, it is less useful in explaining why events occur. However, geospatial intelligence analysis leverages geographic information science and technology with the intelligence tradecraft to develop products that support decision-making in national and homeland security, law enforcement, emergency management, and international relief efforts. GEOG 882 will challenge you to think critically, consider alternative viewpoints, and question your own assumptions when analyzing why human events occur over place and time.

Subject:
Applied Science
Business and Communication
Communication
Cultural Geography
Information Science
Physical Geography
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Mark Corson
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Intelligence
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Intelligence is among the oldest and longest studied topics in all of psychology. The development of assessments to measure this concept is at the core of the development of psychological science itself. This module introduces key historical figures, major theories of intelligence, and common assessment strategies related to intelligence. This module will also discuss controversies related to the study of group differences in intelligence.

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Robert Biswas-Diener
Date Added:
04/10/2018
In the Mountains of New Mexico
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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At age twenty-seven, physicist Philip Morrison joined the Manhattan Project, the code name given to the U.S. government's covert effort at Los Alamos to develop the first nuclear weapon. The Manhattan Project was also the most expensive single program ever financed by public funds. In this video segment, Morrison describes the charismatic leadership of his mentor, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the urgency of their mission to manufacture a weapon 'which if we didn't make first would lead to the loss of the war." In the interview Morrison conducted for War and Peace in the Nuclear Age: 'Dawn,' he describes the remote, inaccessible setting of the laboratory that operated in extreme secrecy. It was this physical isolation, he maintains, that allowed scientists extraordinary freedom to exchange ideas with fellow physicists. Morrison also reflects on his wartime fears. Germany had many of the greatest minds in physics and engineering, which created tremendous anxiety among Allied scientists that it would win the atomic race and the war, and Morrison recalls the elaborate schemes he devised to determine that country's atomic progress. At the time that he was helping assemble the world's first atomic bomb, Morrison believed that nuclear weapons 'could be made part of the construction of the peace.' A month after the war, he toured Hiroshima, and for several years thereafter he testified, became a public spokesman, and lobbied for international nuclear cooperation. After leaving Los Alamos, Morrison returned to academia. For the rest of his life he was a forceful voice against nuclear weapons.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
WGBH Open Vault
Date Added:
02/26/1986
Introduction to Psychology
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course is a survey of the scientific study of human nature, including how the mind works, and how the brain supports the mind. Topics include the mental and neural bases of perception, emotion, learning, memory, cognition, child development, personality, psychopathology, and social interaction. Students will consider how such knowledge relates to debates about nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self, and society.
Course Format
This course has been designed for independent study. It includes all of the materials you will need to understand the concepts covered in this subject. The materials in this course include:

A full set of Lecture Videos by Prof. John Gabrieli.
Reading Assignments in several books, including one free online textbook and detailed notes on another book.
Assorted multiple choice and short answer questions to Check Yourself on the material in each session.
Supporting Discussion content that elaborates on the lectures and reading.
A rich collection of online resources for Further Study on each session’s topics.
A full set of Exams with solution keys, and extra practice questions for review.

Subject:
Life Science
Physical Science
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gabrieli, John
Date Added:
09/01/2011
Introduction to Psychology
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This course surveys questions about human behavior and mental life ranging from how you see to why you fall in love. The great controversies: nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self and society. Students are exposed to the range of theoretical perspectives including biological, evolutionary, cognitive, and psychoanalytic. One of the best aspects of Psychology is that you are the subject matter. This makes it possible to do many demonstrations in lecture that allow you to experience the topic under study. Lectures work in tandem with the textbook. The course breaks into small recitations sections to allow discussion, oral presentations, and individual contact with instructors.

Subject:
Life Science
Physical Science
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Wolfe, Jeremy
Date Added:
09/01/2004
Introduction to Psychology
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When you teach Introduction to Psychology, do you find it difficult — much harder than teaching classes in statistics or research methods? Do you easily give a lecture on the sympathetic nervous system, a lecture on Piaget, and a lecture on social cognition, but struggle with linking these topics together for the student? Do you feel like you are presenting a laundry list of research findings rather than an integrated set of principles and knowledge? Have you wondered how to ensure your course is relevant to your students? Introduction to Psychology utilizes the dual theme of behavior and empiricism to make psychology relevant to intro students. The author wrote this book to help students organize their thinking about psychology at a conceptual level. Five or ten years from now, he does not expect his students to remember the details of most of what he teaches them. However, he does hope that they will remember that psychology matters because it helps us understand behavior and that our knowledge of psychology is based on empirical study.

This is a derivative of INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY by a publisher who has requested that they and the original author not receive attribution, which was originally released and is used under CC BY-NC-SA. This work, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Date Added:
01/01/2017
Introduction to Psychology Course Content
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Introductory psychology course developed through the Ohio Department of Higher Education OER Innovation Grant. The course is part of the Ohio Transfer Module and is also named OSS015. For more information about credit transfer between Ohio colleges and universities please visit: www.ohiohighered.org/transfer.

Team Lead
Vincent Granito Lorain County Community College

Content Contributors
Nicole Brandt Columbus State Community College
Lynne Gabriel Lakeland Community College
Jackie Sample Central Ohio Technical College

Librarian
Rachel Dilley Columbus State Community College

Review Team
Melissa Beers Ohio State University
Brian Gerber Stark State College

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Brian Gerber
Jackie Samle
Lynne Gabriel
Melissa Beers
Nicole Brandt
Rachel Dilley
Vincent Granito
Date Added:
01/11/2019
Neuroscience and Society
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course explores the social relevance of neuroscience, considering how emerging areas of brain research at once reflect and reshape social attitudes and agendas. Topics include brain imaging and popular media; neuroscience of empathy, trust, and moral reasoning; new fields of neuroeconomics and neuromarketing; ethical implications of neurotechnologies such as cognitive enhancement pharmaceuticals; neuroscience in the courtroom; and neuroscientific recasting of social problems such as addiction and violence. Guest lectures by neuroscientists, class discussion, and weekly readings in neuroscience, popular media, and science studies.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Schüll, Natasha
Date Added:
02/01/2010
Neuroscience of Morality
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How do we decide whether an action is morally wrong? How do we choose to do what is right? When and why do we punish wrong-doers? Moral behavior and moral evaluation are functions of the human brain. It is just becoming possible to use neuroscientific methods to understand how they work. This course will consider the mechanisms of morality as a question for neuroscientists.

Subject:
Life Science
Physical Science
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Saxe, Rebecca
Date Added:
09/01/2017
PSY101 - Unit 6 - Cognition and Intelligence
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Unit 6 - Cognition and IntelligenceLearning objectives:1.      Define cognition and intelligence.2.      Explain these different types of intelligence: crystallized & fluid; the three types of intelligence in Sternberg’s “triarchic” theory; “multiple intelligences” in Gardner’s theory; and “emotional intelligence” according to Goleman.3.      Define “I.Q. score” and explain how it is measured.4.      Explain how “normal” intelligence is identified.5.      Define learning disability.6.      Define “intellectual disability” and describe the different subtypes.7.      Explain how intelligence may be influenced by both “nature” and “nurture”.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/08/2017
Phineas Gage and Intelligence
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This module uses the case of Phineas Gage as an opportunity to apply concepts and critical thinking about intelligence. The module is appropriate for Introduction to Psychology courses and includes learning objectives, readings, and critical thinking questions.  

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Wendy Gordon-Hewick
Date Added:
04/07/2020
Psychology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.Senior Contributing AuthorsRose M. Spielman, Formerly of Quinnipiac UniversityContributing AuthorsKathryn Dumper, Bainbridge State CollegeWilliam Jenkins, Mercer UniversityArlene Lacombe, Saint Joseph's UniversityMarilyn Lovett, Livingstone CollegeMarion Perlmutter, University of Michigan

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/14/2014