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African American Civil Rights Movement in Oklahoma
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African Americans have a long history in Oklahoma. They first came to Oklahoma during the forced removal of American Indians because some tribes held African Americans as slaves. There were also African Americans who were American Indian and free. During the Civil War, many of these men in Indian Territory joined the war on both the Union and Confederate sides. Called Buffalo Soldiers, these African American servicemen played a vital role in Oklahoma and Indian Territory as well as in other regions of the West. Both the 9th and the 10th Cavalries and the 24th Infantry served in Indian Territory during the latter nineteenth century. Stationed at Fort Gibson, the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteers Infantry Regiment (later supplemented with the 2nd Kansas) fought at Cabin Creek and at the pivotal engagement of Honey Springs in July 1863. After the Civil War ended in 1865, all of the slaves in the United States, including Indian Territory, were freed. Known as freedmen, many continued living among the Indians.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Oklahoma Historical Society
Date Added:
06/19/2020
America's 2nd Founding
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CC BY-NC
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In this learning experience, the students will complete a primary source inquiry into the impacts of Reconstruction on Black experiences in Virginia and the South. The students will use the Claim-Evidence-Reasoning structure to defend one of two claims.Students will analyze sources that depict/detail Black experiences and perspectives before, during, and after the Reconstruction. This learning experience will be most effective after students have been introduced to the what and when of Reconstruction.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
02/24/2023
“A Dangerous Unselfishness”: Understanding and Teaching the Complex History of Blackface
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CC BY-NC-ND
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When the news story broke that Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and other politicians wore blackface and Klan regalia while in school, institutions across the nation suddenly were confronted with their all too recent blackface past. Princeton Professor Rhae Lynn Barnes, the foremost expert on amateur blackface minstrelsy, has spent over a decade cataloging 10,000 minstrel plays and uncovered their prolific use on Broadway, in schools, the military, churches, political organizations, and even the White House. This webinar will help educators master the basic history of blackface in America, strategies to discuss this difficult topic with students, and ways to think about the incredible social, political, and economic power blackface held as America’s most pervasive entertainment form in the American North and West between the American Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement. By the end of this webinar, educators will be able to teach what a minstrel show was, how the genre developed, who participated in this form, how it was central to mass popular entertainment globally, they will be able to teach the construction of key stereotypes for minorities and women, and how it was pushed underground through a coordinated Civil Rights campaign after being openly celebrated for over a century.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Author:
Rhae Lynn Barnes
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
10/29/2019
Getting an Education
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Educational Use
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This video segment, adapted from NOVA, chronicles the education of leading chemist Percy Julian. Although Julian began his elementary school years in the Deep South under Jim Crow laws, he became one of the few African Americans of his time to earn a Ph.D.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
History, Law, Politics
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
02/12/2007
The Great Migration
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CC BY-NC
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The student will apply social science skills to understand how the nation grew and changed from the end of Reconstruction through the early twentieth century by e) evaluating and explaining the social and cultural impact of industrialization, including rapid urbanization; Great Migration.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
03/01/2023
Ida B. Wells and Anti-Lynching Activism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Ida B. Wells and anti-lynching activism. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Legacy of Lynching in America
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CC BY-NC
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The students will analyze the rise of violent activities against African Americans after the Civil War which lead to the addition of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments. Begin with a KWL Jamboard (also attached, in a PDF format) which also includes an activity in analyzing primary resources about lynching.  Students will then develop their own 5-day trip itinerary using the Negro Green Book (see the list of free PDF versions for various years) as a travel reference guide. The objective of the lesson is to have the students understand the perils faced by US citizens of color during the Jim Crow Era and how prevalent the dangers were in some areas of the United States at that time. The teacher may wish to use a formative assessment in the form of an exit ticket (see attached). 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
02/28/2023
Lesson: Law and Racial Hegemony in Post-emancipation America
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Using a comparative analysis of two sets of laws (one pre-emancipation and one post-emancipation), this lesson provides students an opportunity to better understand how the meaning and boundaries of American freedom have been contested ground throughout history, and how laws were once used to promote white supremacy and restrict black mobility.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Olen Budke
Date Added:
10/04/2020
Post Civil War: Impacts of Prejudice and Discrimination
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CC BY-NC
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Students will complete an IDM (Inquiry Design Model) Lesson to guide them through the social and political discrimination, segregation, and violence against African Americans during the “Jim Crow Era.” They will evaluate the effectiveness of the Reconstruction Amendments based on three supporting questions that help guide them to constructing and providing evidence for a final argument that addresses the compelling question.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
03/01/2023
Radio Fights Jim Crow
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During the World War Two years, a series of groundbreaking radio programs tried to mend the deep racial and ethnic divisions that threatened America. At a time when blacks were usually shown on the radio as lazy buffoons, the federal government and civil rights activists used radio for a counter attack. Did radio unify America in the face of war? This is "Radio Fights Jim Crow".

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
American Public Media
Provider Set:
American RadioWorks
Date Added:
07/10/2003
Remembering Jim Crow
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Remembering Jim Crow is a companion to a radio documentary, and examines the system that, for much of the 20th century, barred many African Americans from their rights as U.S. citizens. Read personal histories of segregation. See a sampling of Jim Crow laws. Learn how African Americans fought economic hardships imposed by Jim Crow and how they built social institutions to combat segregation.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
American Public Media
Provider Set:
American RadioWorks
Date Added:
04/27/2004
Rise and Fall of Jim Crow
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That Jim Crow was a tremendously important period in United States history is undisputable. Less obvious is how to properly address the violence, politics, and complexities that mark the era. This site looks at the century of segregation following the Civil War (1863-1954). Jim Crow, a name taken from a popular 19th-century minstrel song, came to personify government-sanctioned racial oppression and segregation in the U.S. This website describes pivotal developments during that time дус the Emancipation Proclamation, the Compromise of 1877, the Brown v. Board of Education decision, and others.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
PBS
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media
Date Added:
07/10/2003
Teaching Hard History for Racial Healing Curriculum
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Using the C3 Inquiry Design Model format, high school social studies and English students learn to understand lynching in Virginia in the Jim Crow South and discuss ways of taking informed action to move towards racial healing. Each inquiry is supported by the Virginia Standards of Learning and the Common Core Standards and is expected to take three-four 50-minute class periods. The inquiry time frame can expand if teachers think their students need additional instructional experiences (e.g., historical context, formative performance tasks, featured sources, writing, etc.). Teachers are encouraged to adjust the inquiry to meet the needs and interests of their students and school/community contexts. The inquiries lend themselves to differentiation and modeling of historical thinking skills while assisting students in reading a wide variety of sources and writing in a wide variety of genres.Use the next button or the drop down menu to navigate between pages. Please note, Social studies lessons are found at the bottom of page 2 and English lesson are found at the bottom of page 3.  For more information and/or access to the primary sources used in the lesson plans, please visit the Racial Terror: Lynching in Virginia website.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
JMU COE Curriculum Development Team
Elaine Kaye
Nicole Wilson
Date Added:
10/20/2021