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American Government
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
Conversations with History: Vice President Cheney and America's Response to 911
Read the Fine Print
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0.0 stars

Host Harry Kreisler welcomes Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, U.S. Army (ret.), for a discussion of the break down of the national security process in the G.W. Bush Administration. Col. Wilkerson offers an insider's view of the Cheney-Rumsfeld cabal that drove American policy in the wake of the Al Qaeda attack on 911. The Vice President’s manipulation of the policy process, he argues, led to a lack of a post conflict planning for Iraq and the failure to abide by the Geneva conventions. Wilkerson analyzes the motives of Cheney/Rumsfeld, their penchant for secrecy, and speculates long term costs to American democracy and power. (58 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
06/09/2007
I'm Watching You 24/7
Read the Fine Print
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0.0 stars

The post-Renaissance world saw the nation-state mature and confront the issue of how to control the lives of its citizens. Two models of political organization, democratic and authoritarian, gradually developed. During the twentieth century, as some nations granted individuals and groups more and more rights, ideology and modern technology enabled authoritarian governments to gain ever more control, until community interest dominated the individual and totalitarianism was born. Although Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union have passed into history and there are cracks in the total control of the People's Republic of China, North Korea still retains all of the characteristics of totalitarianism. Still technically at war with the United Nations Forces, it poses a threat to the world at large with its developing nuclear program. At the same time it continues to threaten its perceived enemies. Very few foreigners have been able to visit and record life in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (the official name of North Korea), and the nation remains largely unknown to outsiders. This lesson will begin with an introductory activity that draws on students' prior knowledge to discuss, 'How does a society create social and political order?' After brainstorming the characteristics of totalitarianism, the class will be divided into groups to locate historical examples and create a Document Based Question to share with their classmates. Students will next examine excerpts from the WIDE ANGLE film 'A State of Mind' (2003) to see how the characteristics of totalitarian societies still operate today in North Korea. As a culminating activity, students will analyze editorials on North Korea's nuclear program from newspapers around the world, formulate their own opinions, and write a Letter to the Editor of their local newspaper.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Thirteen/WNET New York
Provider Set:
WIDE ANGLE: Window into Global History
Author:
Mirla Morrison
Date Added:
05/19/2006
Lenses of Vietnam: Protest in a Democracy [Inquiry Design Model (IDM) Unit Plan]
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Is protest important in a democracy?” using the Vietnam War as a lens to approach the topic. To accomplish this, students will become more media literate through evaluating sources, biases, perspectives, and the goals of creating media. Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy while analzying the Compelling Question and learning about the historical protests of the Vietnam Era.This inquiry is expected to take two weeks (10 periods) to complete: one 45-minute class period to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions; and then three 45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative thesis. If students are as of yet less familiar with media literacy, the instructor should add at least another class period, or more, introducing them more fully to this.The full unit, along with all materials and resources, is available as a PDF attachment.

Subject:
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Adam MacDonald
Date Added:
06/23/2020
Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to a set of core writings in the field of urban sociology. Topics include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We examine the key theoretical paradigms that have constituted the field since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these paradigmatic shifts for urban scholarship, social policy and the planning practice.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Davis, Diane
Date Added:
02/01/2009
Urban Sociology in Theory and Practice
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course explores the creative dialectic—and sometimes conflict—between sociology and urban policy and design. Topics include the changing conceptions of “community,” the effects of neighborhood characteristics on individual outcomes, the significance of social capital and networks, the drivers of categorical inequality, and the interaction of social structure and political power. Students will examine key theoretical paradigms that have constituted sociology since its founding, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban research and planning practice.
This seminar took place at the Massachusetts Correctional Institution in Norfolk, MA, with half the class from MIT and half of the class from MCI Norfolk via the Boston University Prison Education Program. The location and composition of the class was chosen based on the belief that bringing together students of sociology and urban studies who are incarcerated with those who are at MIT would create a unique and valuable environment in which to generate new knowledge about our social world and the repeated mechanisms that contribute to persistent socio-economic inequality and other pressing social problems.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mehta, Aditi
Steil, Justin
Date Added:
02/01/2016