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The American Founding in Practice: Ideals vs. Reality
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The United States was founded on the principles of natural rights, equality, and classical republicanism, but how well did it actually live up to these ideals? In this lecture, Professor Rob McDonald of the US Military Academy at West Point describes the conflict between the ideals of the American Revolution and the unfortunate realities of the time.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Rob McDonald
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Britain’s Law-and-Order Strategy and Its Consequences
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Explain how Great Britain’s response to the destruction of a British shipment of tea in Boston Harbor in 1773 set the stage for the RevolutionDescribe the beginnings of the American Revolution

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Kirstin Lawson
Date Added:
07/16/2018
The Citizenship Complex: Why the Vote Matters in the Race for Freedom and Equality for All
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Not all people are born equal or free but there is an expectation of both when you are a citizen of the United States. Our struggles to earn the base level of representation are quickly forgotten as we look for another group to demonize. In my unit we will discover why George Washington was ahead of his time with his warning about "factions" and how their existence makes freedom and equality harder to bridge. As we trek through time highlighting issues such as the abolition of slavery, support for women's suffrage, and the challenges that face Asian and LGBTQIA communities my hope is that student understand the sacrifices made to be accepted and to earn the right to vote but more importantly the difficulty in being welcomed into American society.

The “Citizenship Complex” is the process by which groups gain full inclusion. To understand it, one must look to the intersection of law, citizenship and the Constitution. The unit aims to provide a more complex history of our nation, to tell a more earnest story of how the American identity became a mosaic of human struggle, and to offer a more robust and enlightening study of these issues so that as students recognize the power of citizenship they will take a more hopeful view of what our nation will look like in the future. By engaging in the sophisticated discussions of the past, identifying why some groups supported each other and scapegoated others, and learning about the importance of supporting efforts at inclusion, our students should become more informed, open-minded, and ready for the globalized world of the 21 st Century.

The unit will focus on four groups that have experienced the “Citizenship Complex”: African-American slaves, women, Asian immigrants, and the LGBTQIA community. By comparing these groups over time, we will really be able to unearth the cycles behind the Citizenship Complex and understand that American citizenship means at different times in our country’s history.

Subject:
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Lenses of Vietnam: Protest in a Democracy [Inquiry Design Model (IDM) Unit Plan]
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Is protest important in a democracy?” using the Vietnam War as a lens to approach the topic. To accomplish this, students will become more media literate through evaluating sources, biases, perspectives, and the goals of creating media. Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy while analzying the Compelling Question and learning about the historical protests of the Vietnam Era.This inquiry is expected to take two weeks (10 periods) to complete: one 45-minute class period to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions; and then three 45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative thesis. If students are as of yet less familiar with media literacy, the instructor should add at least another class period, or more, introducing them more fully to this.The full unit, along with all materials and resources, is available as a PDF attachment.

Subject:
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Adam MacDonald
Date Added:
06/23/2020
On Civic Republicanism: Ancient Lessons for Global Politics
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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With contributions from scholars across North America and Europe, this edited volume explores contemporary political problems through various texts from antiquity through the present. Divided into two parts and a total of 15 chapters, the first five chapters explore “the classical heritage” and the last ten chapters turn to European Enlightenment ideas.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Geofrey C. Kellow
Neven Leddy
Date Added:
12/08/2022
U.S. History
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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 U.S. History is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of most introductory courses. The text provides a balanced approach to U.S. history, considering the people, events, and ideas that have shaped the United States from both the top down (politics, economics, diplomacy) and bottom up (eyewitness accounts, lived experience). U.S. History covers key forces that form the American experience, with particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender.Senior Contributing AuthorsP. Scott Corbett, Ventura CollegeVolker Janssen, California State University, FullertonJohn M. Lund, Keene State CollegeTodd Pfannestiel, Clarion UniversityPaul Vickery, Oral Roberts UniversitySylvie Waskiewicz

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
05/07/2014
U.S. History, America's War for Independence, 1775-1783, Britain’s Law-and-Order Strategy and Its Consequences
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Explain how Great Britain’s response to the destruction of a British shipment of tea in Boston Harbor in 1773 set the stage for the RevolutionDescribe the beginnings of the American Revolution

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
07/10/2017