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Alloy the Way to Mars
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Educational Use
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Acting as engineering teams, students take measurements and make calculations to determine the specific strength of various alloys and then report their data to the rest of the class. Using this class data, students write data-based recommendations to NASA regarding the best alloy to use in the construction of the engine and engine turbines for the Space Launch System that will eventually be used to transport astronauts to Mars.

Subject:
Chemistry
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janelle Orange
Date Added:
02/03/2017
Conceptual Physics
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Conceptual Physics is a year-long course based on CK-12 OER instructional material and supplemented with limited commercially-available materials. The course is project-based, argument-driven inquiry. Each unit begins with presentation of an intriguing phenomenon, followed by an essential question about the phenomenon, and a project centered on answering that essential question. Throughout the unit, students conduct research and investigations to answer portions of the question. Each unit has a student "Task" at the end that serves as an assessment of the unit's concepts. At the end of each unit, students assemble all of the unit tasks and synthesize a personal final project that answers the essential question in a personal context chosen by the student.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Jonathan Frostad
Gary Thayer
Malia Turner
Zachary Sawhill
Mackenzie Neal
Michael Crebbin
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
10/19/2021
Engineering for the Red Planet
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In this video segment from NASA, robotics researcher Ayanna Howard uses engineering to improve the intelligence of robots in space exploration.

Subject:
Applied Science
Astronomy
Chemistry
Education
Engineering
Geoscience
Physical Science
Physics
Space Science
Technology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Argosy Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
05/09/2006
Google Moon - Apollo Series
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Google teamed up with scientists at the NASA Ames Research Center to create this collection of lunar maps and charts. This tool is an exciting new way to explore the story of the Apollo missions, still the only time mankind has set foot on another world.

Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Google
Provider Set:
Google Earth
Date Added:
03/21/2014
The Great Gravity Escape
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Educational Use
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Students use water balloons and a length of string to understand how the force of gravity between two objects and the velocity of a spacecraft can balance to form an orbit. They see that when the velocity becomes too great for gravity to hold the spacecraft in orbit, the object escapes the orbit and travels further away from the planet.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chris Yakacki
Daria Kotys-Schwartz
Geoffrey Hill
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Timothy M. Dittrich
Date Added:
10/14/2015
The History of the U.S. Space Race
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
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A Mini book that is an overview of the US Space Race and how it evolved. Listed in the Index is the State of Texas TEKS for the EOC Grade 11 Exit Test.  Some of these TEKS cross over into WW1 and WW2 as well. It is not meant as a definitive resource, but rather a jumping-off point for young teachers of Social Studies, Science, STEM, or STEAM-related courses to inject some cross-curricular reading and writing and to promote critical thinking and a source of context for those courses aforementioned. It is also a starting point for activities (graphic organizers) and videos for classroom use or online learning purposes. It can be adapted to as low as 5th grade but only for supplemental purposes as their TEKS do not address this period.

Subject:
Astronomy
Economics
Political Science
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Julie Oldham
Date Added:
03/07/2023
How Would You Turn a Bolt in Space?
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Educational Use
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In this fast-paced NASA Brain BitesŒ_íěÖ video, an astronaut demonstrates the impact of microgravity on the use of tools in space.

Subject:
Applied Science
Chemistry
Engineering
Physical Science
Physics
Technology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
Argosy Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
05/09/2006
Lunar Lander
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Can you avoid the boulder field and land safely, just before your fuel runs out, as Neil Armstrong did in 1969? Our version of this classic video game accurately simulates the real motion of the lunar lander with the correct mass, thrust, fuel consumption rate, and lunar gravity. The real lunar lander is very hard to control.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Michael Dubson
Date Added:
01/26/2007
Mini-EUSO: Seeking new heights in science from the International Space Station
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"Dark matter, cosmic rays, otherworldly lightning, and meteors. Not bad for a day’s work. That’s the ambitious workload researchers have charged to Mini-EUSO, a revolutionary new telescope peering back at earth from aboard the International Space Station. Hitching a ride on a Russian Soyuz rocket, Mini-EUSO docked with the ISS just this past August. Fitted with state-of-the-art optics, its goal is to carry out the first-ever nighttime observations of the earth’s atmosphere at near-ultraviolet wavelengths. This special “UV eye” will turn the atmosphere into a gigantic laboratory for exploring fascinating scientific phenomena—some bound to teach us more about the earth, some that could teach us more about the entire universe. One of Mini-EUSO’s tasks will be to search for traces of a substance known as “strange quark matter”. This matter is generally believed to make up the super-dense core of neutron stars. But it might also be scattered as droplets both big and small across the universe..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/25/2020
A Nanotube Space Elevator
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Educational Use
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In this video adapted from NOVA scienceNOW, find out about the discovery of a new building material, the carbon nanotube, whose physical properties could theoretically enable the creation of a 22,000-mile elevator to space.

Subject:
Applied Science
Chemistry
Engineering
Physical Science
Physics
Technology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
08/26/2008
Perspectives on Ocean Science: Bring 'em Back Alive - The Search for Life on Mars in the Coming Decades
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Explore the difficulties faced with collecting samples and how we are searching for evidence of life on Mars with Scripps Institution's Jeff Bada. (52 minutes)

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
04/11/2006
President Nixon speaking with astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin on the Moon
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
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On July 20, 1969, the Apollo 11 mission brought the first humans to the Moon. On that day President Nixon spoke with crewmembers Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin via telephone-radio transmission.

Source: This edited presentation features film footage from the White House Staff Super 8 Film Collection and audio from the White House Communications Agency Sound Recording Collection.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Nixon Presidential Library & Museum
Date Added:
07/20/1969
Primary Source Exemplar: The Moon
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
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Through a study of the moon, students will be guided through an inquiry process using primary sources to learn how we shape our understanding of the past (history). They will also learn how new discoveries and observations change our perceptions over time, as each succeeding generation creates knowledge and adds new technology. Students will then pose their own questions to wonder how future discoveries or new technology might change our understanding of the world and our universe.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
04/03/2014
Robots on Ice
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Students learn about humankind’s search for life in outer space and how it connects to robotics and engineering. NASA is interested in sending exploratory missions to one of Jupiter’s moons, Europa, which requires a lot of preparatory research and development on Earth before it can happen. One robot currently being engineered as a proof of concept for a possible trip to explore Europa is the Icefin, which is an innovative robot that can explore under ice and in water, which are the believed conditions on Europa. This lesson provides students with intriguing information about far off (distance and time!) space missions and field robotics, and also sets up two associated robotics and arts integration activities to follow. The lesson can be used individually to provide new information to students, or as a precursor to the associated activities. A PowerPoint® presentation and worksheet are provided.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Anthony Spears
Ayanna Howard
Carrie Beth Rykowski
Date Added:
02/07/2017
Robots on Ice Engineering Challenge
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In a simulation of potential future space missions to Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons, student teams are challenged to direct a robot placed in an enclosed maze to search for and find the most “alien life.” The robot is equipped with a camera to send a live feed of its surroundings in the maze. Students control the robot from outside the maze by looking at the live feed on a smartphone and using the robot’s remote control, making a map as they go. The student teams compete as if they are space agencies creating their own exploratory systems to meet the challenge’s criteria and constraints and prove “in the field” that they have the best plan to win the mission contract and get the job. This activity simulates the real-world research of scientists and engineers developing a robot with the capabilities to explore under the ice-covered surface of Europa.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Anthony Spears
Ayanna Howard
Carrie Beth Rykowski
Date Added:
02/07/2017
Solar Sails: The Future of Space Travel
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Educational Use
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Working as if they were engineers, students design and construct model solar sails made of aluminum foil to move cardboard tube satellites through “space” on a string. Working in teams, they follow the engineering design thinking steps—empathize, define, ideate, prototype, test, redesign—to design and test small-scale solar sails for satellites and space probes. During the process, learn about Newton’s laws of motion and the transfer of energy from wave energy to mechanical energy. A student activity worksheet is provided.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Matthew Bentley
Date Added:
02/07/2017