Updating search results...

Search Resources

48 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • stars
ASTR 1020 - Lab 12: Mapping the Milky Way
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

In 1610, Galileo made the first telescopic survey of the Milky Way and discovered that it is composed of a multitude of individual stars. Today, we know that the Milky Way comprises our view inward of the huge cosmic pinwheel that we call the Milky Way Galaxy and that is our home. Moreover, our Galaxy is now recognized as just one galaxy among many billions of other galaxies in the cosmos.---------------------------------------Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/17/2022
ASTR 1020 - Lab 6: Light Curves
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

A plot of luminosity vs. time is a ‘light curve’. In this laboratory, we will use a light curve to determine the diameter of two stars in a binary system.  --------------------------------------- Distant Nature: Astronomy Exercises 2016 by Stephen Tuttle under license "Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike".

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Hollyanna White
Date Added:
05/26/2022
Astronomy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Astronomy is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of one- or two-semester introductory astronomy courses. The book begins with relevant scientific fundamentals and progresses through an exploration of the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. The Astronomy textbook builds student understanding through the use of relevant analogies, clear and non-technical explanations, and rich illustrations. Mathematics is included in a flexible manner to meet the needs of individual instructors.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Andrew Fraknoi
David Morrison
Sidney C. Wolff
Date Added:
11/19/2019
Astronomy Activities
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

This website has five great astronomy activities! By engaging in these activities, you can learn about the Milky Way Galaxy, the Sun, the Big Dipper, and stars!

Subject:
Education
Geoscience
Physical Science
Space Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
SMARTR
Provider Set:
SMARTR: Virtual Learning Experiences for Youth
Date Added:
11/06/2010
Astropedia
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

Intended for all audiences, this textbook is an introduction to the nature of the universe. Use it to research or review our solar system, stars, galaxies, and the history of the universe. Each chapter has a set of corresponding homework questions.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Teach Astronomy
Author:
Chris Impey
Date Added:
01/01/2015
Camping Trip: How Can We Measure the Wavelength of Light Emitted From Stars?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This activity is a chance for students to apply the diffraction grating equation m*Λ/d = Θ to solve a real life problem: find the wavelength of given source of light. It is also useful for them to apply trigonometry to real life scenarios.

Subject:
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Pedagogy in Action
Date Added:
12/09/2011
Cosmic Origin of the Chemical Elements
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Everything around us is made from different chemical elements: carbon, silicon, iron, and all the other elements from the Periodic Table. The lighter elements were mostly produced in the Big Bang, but the rest were (and are) formed within stars and in the explosions of supernovae. In this series of short lecture videos, created to accompany her book Searching for the Oldest Stars: Ancient Relics from the Early Universe (Princeton University Press, 2019), Professor Anna Frebel reveals the secrets of stardust and explains the cosmic origin of the elements.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Frebel, Anna
Date Added:
09/01/2019
Double Take
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Based only on what we see when we watch stars in the sky, it’s easy to believe that the stars revolve around a stationary Earth, a common misconception among children. Although many students have at least heard that the Earth spins, they may not have thought about how this affects how we see stars, planets and the Moon.

In this activity, students find evidence of the Earth’s spinning through observing the apparent movement of stars. They use outstretched arms to measure the distance between a star and an object at the horizon. Later, they return to the same spot, re-measure, and notice that the star is in a different position, and try to explain this movement. Finally, the instructor shares the accepted scientific explanation for the phenomenon.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Beetles: Science and Teaching for Field Instructors
Date Added:
05/04/2020
Evening Sky Watching for Students
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Nursery (or Kindergarten or Preschool) students enjoy seeing the evening sky with the teacher from the playground or through a big window (indoor). This is especially relevant for students who stay for extra-hour care. During late evening hours, some students feel a little lonely waiting for their parents, but they have a wonderful natural treasure: the evening sky. By observing the evening sky with the naked eye, they will notice many colours, changing colours, the first star, the subtle colours of stars, twinkling stars, and the movement of stars. Nursery teachers who think they are not science-oriented will also gain guidance skills of introducing science to students. This activity is also useful for primary school students, especially younger-grade students.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Akihiko Tomita
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Fifth Grade Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects-Earth & Space:  Patterns in the Sky
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

The Fifth Grade Elementary Framework for Science and Integrated Subjects,Earth and Space: Patterns in the Sky, uses the phenomena of perceived sun and moon movements that seem to move around the Earth to explore stars, Earth orbit and rotation and moon orbit around Earth.  It is part of Elementary Framework for Science and Integrated Subjects project, a statewide Clime Time collaboration among ESD 123, ESD 105, North Central ESD, and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Development of the resources is in response to a need for research- based science lessons for elementary teachers that are integrated with English language arts, mathematics and other subjects such as social studies. The template for Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects  can serve as an organized, coherent and research-based roadmap for teachers in the development of their own NGSS aligned science lessons.  Lessons can also be useful for classrooms that have no adopted curriculum as well as to serve as enhancements for  current science curriculum. The EFSIS project brings together grade level teams of teachers to develop lessons or suites of lessons that are 1) pnenomena based, focused on grade level Performance Expectations, and 2) leverage ELA and Mathematics Washington State Learning Standards.

Subject:
Astronomy
Education
Elementary Education
Measurement and Data
Physical Science
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Georgia Boatman
Date Added:
08/20/2021
Five Pointed Star Origami
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Origami is the Japanese art of paper folding, originally from China and now practiced all over the world. In this activity, create an origami star. Introduce children to both geometry and analytical skills in a creative way.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
UNAWE
Provider Set:
EU Universe Awareness
Date Added:
03/20/2012
Galaxies and Dark Matter
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This video lesson has the goal of introducing students to galaxies as large collections of gravitationally bound stars. It explores the amount of matter needed for a star to remain bound and then brings in the idea of Dark Matter, a new kind of matter that does not interact with light. It is best if students have had some high school level mechanics, ideally Newton's laws, orbital motion and centripetal force. The teacher guide segment has a derivation of centripetal acceleration. This lesson should be mostly accessible to students with no physics background. The video portion of this lesson runs about 30 minutes, and the questions and demonstrations will give a total activity time of about an hour if the materials are all at hand and the students work quickly. However, 1 1/2 hours is a more comfortable amount of time. There are several demonstrations that can be carried out using string, ten or so balls of a few inches in diameter, a stopwatch or clock with a sweep second hand and some tape. The demonstrations are best done outside, but can also be carried out in a gymnasium or other large room. If the materials or space are not available, there are videos of the demonstrations in the module and these may be used.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Peter Fisher
Date Added:
06/03/2015
Introduction to Astronomy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subject:
Physical Science
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rappaport, Saul
Date Added:
02/01/2006
Introduction to Astronomy, Spring 2006
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This course includes Quantitative introduction to physics of the solar system, stars, interstellar medium, the Galaxy, and Universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Topics: planets, planet formation; stars, the Sun, "normal" stars, star formation; stellar evolution, supernovae, compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), plusars, binary X-ray sources; star clusters, globular and open clusters; interstellar medium, gas, dust, magnetic fields, cosmic rays; distance ladder; galaxies, normal and active galaxies, jets; gravitational lensing; large scaling structure; Newtonian cosmology, dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe; cosmic microwave background radiation; big-bang nucleosynthesis. No prior knowledge of astronomy necessary. Not usable as a restricted elective by physics majors.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Rappaport, Saul
Date Added:
01/01/2006
A Journey Through Outer Space
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Our Solar SystemThis is a YouTube video/link of a unit I created using Canva. The video is a read aloud of Pluto and the Planets. There are 5 student led activities at the end with ways to assess each activty. Essential questions are included in addition to possible student questions, and teacher inquiry questions. Also, there are additional texts that can be incorporated into the lessons as well. 

Subject:
Astronomy
Space Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Shea Richardson
Date Added:
07/01/2023