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  • World History
100 People: A World Portrait
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This website gives you the opportunity see the world through different people all over the world on a variety of topics. Watch videos, see lesson plans about global issues and looking at it from a lense of focus on 100 people.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
History
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lesson
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
01/31/2018
1492: An Ongoing Voyage
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The exhibition 1492: AN ONGOING VOYAGE describes both pre- and post-contact America, as well as the Mediterranean world at the same time. Compelling questions are raised, such as: Who lived in the Americas before 1492? Who followed in the wake of Columbus? What was the effect of 1492 for Americans throughout the Western Hemisphere? The Library of Congress' Quincentenary exhibition addresses these questions, as well as other related themes, including fifteenth century European navigation, the myths and facts surrounding the figure of Columbus, and the differences and similarities between European and American world views at the time of contact.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Date Added:
07/13/2000
2 or 10 Day Armenian Genocide Lesson Plan
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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The Two Day plan is intended to be completed in two fifty-minute class periods, with 2 homework assignments, the lesson includes the definition of genocide, historical background on the Armenian case, a review of other major genocides, a short national TV news piece, and readings from survivor testimonies.The Ten Day lesson includes film, primary documents, and the UN Declaration of Human RightsPart II, examines the economic developments of competing empires with subsequent loss of territory and rise of state repression over time. The final product is a colorful timeline linking seemingly disparate elements into a visible pattern. Students will also gain the opportunity to place the Armenian Genocide next to other acts of genocide and human rights abuses throughout history.Part III builds on the basic information learned in Part I and the larger historic and political overview gained in Part II. Students can participate in a mock re-enactment of the 1921 trial of Soghomon Tehlirian, who assassinated the mastermind of the Armenian Genocide and was later acquitted. The mock trial allows students to develop historical empathy with the victims and survivors of the Armenian Genocide.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
06/11/2021
5 Favorite Films About Modern Latin America
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This video offers a brief review of 5 wonderful films that focus on specific topics in modern Latin American History.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Career and Technical Education
Education
Ethnic Studies
Film and Music Production
Higher Education
History
Social Science
U.S. History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/09/2020
6th Grade Social Studies: Foundations of Human Civilization
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource will teach students about the cause and effect of factors that lead to the Agricultural Revolution. Students will learn about BCE/CE timelines with a timeline worksheet. Includes assessment about early humans and the Agricultural Revolution. 

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Anna Reed-Raney
Date Added:
07/05/2023
AFRO AMER 101: Introduction to African American Studies 2019
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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African American Studies 101 is a multidisciplinary course that embodies the empirical study of history, politics, culture, religion and other areas within the social sciences. The essential focus is on the life experiences of peoples of African descent in the United States and globally. The course integrates the works of scholars of ancient African civilization, New World enslavement of African Americans, economics, literature, arts, race, women studies, government and sport studies. Furthermore, through the interdisciplinary lifeline of African American Studies, this course will give special attention to black athleticism.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
03/14/2024
AFRS 4010/6610: African Diaspora Theory/Diaspora & Transnational Theories 2020
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course aims to familiarize students with major concepts and theories related to the study of the African Diaspora primarily, though not exclusively, in the Americas (North, South, and Central). This course links, compares, and contextualizes the historical experiences of African descendants in the U.S., the Caribbean, South America, and Africa within global processes of enslavement, colonialism, and systematic oppression. The course treats the African Diaspora as 1) historical phenomenon 2) a current condition of social, economic, and political life and 3) a way of imagining the future. We will explore theories of slavery, race, and capitalism; black resistance; post-emancipation economies and current-day neoliberalism; theories of gender; environmental justice in the African Diaspora; and theories of the black digital sphere.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
03/26/2024
AP World/H4 Family History Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator: Sean McManamon to meet NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence  for World History. Adaptable to other grades. Cumulative assignment for the end of the year. Assignment asks students to connect family history interview to World History periodization.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
09/25/2019
AP World History: Japanese Internment Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator David Richman for his AP World History course. Adaptable to US History. Adaptable to other grades. Assignments ask students research the effects Executive Order 9066 had on families of Japanese descent, to analyze primary sources, and to create an illustrated story book detailing Ms. Wakatsuki’s time spent at Manzanar, a Japanese internment camp.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
09/28/2019
AP World History Syllabus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The course is designed for students to develop a greater understanding of global processes and interaction between all human societies. The course follows a thematic approach which will highlight the nature of international continuities and changes, their causes and consequences, and comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge in conjunction with interpretive issues and many types of historical evidence. Beginning with the start of civilization, focusing on the past millennium, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that influence developments throughout history. The course begins with the rise of civilizations and extends through the modern world.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
04/20/2024
AP World History Syllabus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This AP world history course was designed based on five themes: Interactions between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state-building, expansion, and conflict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; and development and transformation of social structures. The course explores historical events from the 13th century through the 20th century. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
02/02/2024
AP World History Syllabus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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AP World History is designed to develop a greater understanding of global processes and interaction between all human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of factual knowledge and analytical skills. The course follows a thematic approach which will highlight the nature of international continuities and changes, their causes and consequences, and comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge in conjunction with interpretive issues and many types of historical evidence. The course will also focus on learning to write mechanically in the “AP style”. Beginning in earnest around 1250, focusing on the past millennium, the course builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that influence developments throughout history. The course begins with the rise of civilizations and extends through the turmoil of the modern world.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
04/20/2024
Accomodatio et Transformatio: Spartacus, Slavery, and the Red Scare
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Primary source documents serve as the bedrock of all reliable social studies. They provide firsthand facts, descriptions, opinions, and accounts which illuminate the distant world of the past while allowing us to better understand the present. To many students, however, primary source documents are foreign, verbose, and tedious.

In order to reach out to these students, a history teacher’s best weapon is often adaptation, especially through the medium of film. Passionate actors, perceptive directors, witty screenwriters, and elaborate costumes bring dusty historical documents back to life through an immersive audiovisual experience.

Yet with a bit of inspection, these cinematic adaptations of history can reveal much more than secondary historical details. By analyzing these films as primary source documents themselves, audiences can gain insight into the time period in which the movies were made.

This curriculum unit considers the story of Spartacus—the celebrated hero of ancient history and the 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick—as both a primary and secondary source of history. How does Spartacus compare to the ancient sources recorded before the common era? And how does Spartacus reveal the political and social turmoil which afflicted the United States throughout the 1950’s and 1960’s?

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2017 Curriculum Units Volume I
Date Added:
08/01/2017
Activity: "Unpacking Standards"
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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This can be an activity to use with your colleagues in assessing your unit design with the new Iowa Social Studies standards or with students as an intro (or closing) activity for a "Atlantic Revolutions" unit. A teacher could use SS-WH.9-12.14. Compare various systems of government, such as monarchies, democracies/republics, empires, and dictatorships, and their methods of maintaining order and/or control.SS-WH.9-12.23. Critique primary and secondary sources of information with attention to the source of the document, its context, accuracy, and usefulness of sources throughout world historySS-WH.9-12.20. Evaluate methods used to change or expand systems of power and/or authority.or choose from: https://iowacore.gov/sites/default/files/k-12_socialstudies.pdf 

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Mark Augspurger
Date Added:
05/22/2018
Advanced Topics: Plotting Terror in European Culture
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This interdisciplinary course surveys modern European culture to disclose the alignment of literature, opposition, and revolution. Reaching back to the foundational representations of anarchism in nineteenth-century Europe (Kleist, Conrad) the curriculum extends through the literary and media representations of militant organizations in the 1970s and 80s (Italy's Red Brigade, Germany's Red Army Faction, and the Real Irish Republican Army). In the middle of the term students will have the opportunity to hear a lecture by Margarethe von Trotta, one of the most important filmmakers who has worked on terrorism. The course concludes with a critical examination of the ways that certain segments of European popular media have returned to the "radical chic" that many perceive to have exhausted itself more than two decades ago.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Graphic Arts
History
Literature
Reading Literature
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Scribner, Charity
Date Added:
02/01/2004
Advanced Topics in Hispanic Literature and Film: The Films of Luis Buñuel
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course considers films spanning the entire career of pioneering Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel (1900–1983), from his silent surrealist classic of 1929, Un perro andaluz, to his last film, Ese oscuro objeto del deseo (1977). We pay special attention to his Mexican period, in exile, and the films he made in, and about, Spain, including his work in documentary. It explores Buñuel's early friendship with painter Salvador Dalí and poet Federico García Lorca, surrealist aesthetics, the influence of Freud's ideas on dreams and sexuality, and the director's corrosive criticism of bourgeois society and the Catholic church. We will focus on historical contexts and relevant film criticism.
About This Course on OpenCourseWare
The instructor of this course, Elizabeth Garrels, is a Professor Emeritus at MIT. She retired in 2014 after 35 years at the Institute. Professor Garrels taught this course for over 15 years, and it evolved over this time period. Normally, a course on OCW represents the version of a course taught during a specific semester and year. However, for this course we hope to represent the evolution of the course during the main years it was taught. The materials you see here are not from a particular iteration of the course, but are drawn from all of the years the course was taught.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Career and Technical Education
Film and Music Production
History
Social Science
Visual Arts
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Garrels, Elizabeth
Date Added:
09/01/2013
Africa and the Atlantic World
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The presentation explores the political, social, and religious history of the states, kingdoms, and empires of African from roughly the fifteenth century through the twentieth century. It looks at the slave trade within Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
01/25/2024
Africa and the Politics of Knowledge
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This course considers how, despite its immense diversity, Africa continues to hold purchase as both a geographical entity and meaningful knowledge category. It examines the relationship between articulations of "Africa" and projects like European imperialism, developments in the biological sciences, African de-colonization and state-building, and the imagining of the planet's future. Readings in anthropology and history are organized around five themes: space and place, race, representation, self-determination, and time.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
History
Political Science
Social Science
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Edoh, M. Amah
Date Added:
02/01/2019
African Diaspora Group Discussion Questions
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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These questions are intended to be discussed in small groups in the classroom. They consider the definition and impact of the African Diaspora as well as its similarities and differences in relation to other diasporas. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
03/26/2024