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"1619 Project": The Idea of America
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Educational Use
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In this lesson students will read to uncover hidden truths about the many contributions of enslaved Africans to the development of the United States. They will express their understanding by writing a text-based claim supported by evidence to show how African Americans paved the way for other marginalized communities to fight oppression, so the principles of American democracy apply to all people in America.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pulitzer Center
Author:
Buffalo Public Schools Office of Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Initiatives
Date Added:
06/28/2021
9/11 and the Constitution
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The anniversaries of the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, and the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, provide us an opportunity to reflect upon who we are as Americans, examine our most fundamental values and principles and affirm our commitment to them, and evaluate progress toward the realization of American ideals and propose actions that might narrow the gap between these ideals and reality. The following lessons are designed to accomplish these goals.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Center Staff
Date Added:
09/24/2021
Activism in the US
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
American Government
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
America's Founding: Why Our Founding Fathers Risked It All
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Have you ever stopped to think about the incredible risks the Founding Founders took when they rebelled against British authority? They were starting a war with the greatest military power of the time even though they did not have a mighty fighting force themselves. And they were fighting for a type of government that most people thought was impossible. In this video mini-course, Professor Sarah Burns of the Rochester Institute of Technology explains the historical and philosophical context of the American Revolution from the changing role of the British army in the colonies to Radical Whig theory.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Sarah Burns
Date Added:
07/04/2016
Building Democracy for All: Interactive Explorations of Government and Civic Life
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

Designed as a core or supplementary text for upper elementary, middle and high school teachers and students, Building Democracy for All offers instructional ideas, interactive resources, multicultural content, and multimodal learning materials for interest-building explorations of United States government as well as students’ roles as citizens in a democratic society. It focuses on the importance of community engagement and social responsibility as understood and acted upon by middle and high school students—core themes in the 2018 Massachusetts 8th Grade Curriculum Framework, and which are found in many state history and social studies curriculum frameworks around the country.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Date Added:
03/30/2020
The Citizenship Complex: Why the Vote Matters in the Race for Freedom and Equality for All
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Educational Use
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Not all people are born equal or free but there is an expectation of both when you are a citizen of the United States. Our struggles to earn the base level of representation are quickly forgotten as we look for another group to demonize. In my unit we will discover why George Washington was ahead of his time with his warning about "factions" and how their existence makes freedom and equality harder to bridge. As we trek through time highlighting issues such as the abolition of slavery, support for women's suffrage, and the challenges that face Asian and LGBTQIA communities my hope is that student understand the sacrifices made to be accepted and to earn the right to vote but more importantly the difficulty in being welcomed into American society.

The “Citizenship Complex” is the process by which groups gain full inclusion. To understand it, one must look to the intersection of law, citizenship and the Constitution. The unit aims to provide a more complex history of our nation, to tell a more earnest story of how the American identity became a mosaic of human struggle, and to offer a more robust and enlightening study of these issues so that as students recognize the power of citizenship they will take a more hopeful view of what our nation will look like in the future. By engaging in the sophisticated discussions of the past, identifying why some groups supported each other and scapegoated others, and learning about the importance of supporting efforts at inclusion, our students should become more informed, open-minded, and ready for the globalized world of the 21 st Century.

The unit will focus on four groups that have experienced the “Citizenship Complex”: African-American slaves, women, Asian immigrants, and the LGBTQIA community. By comparing these groups over time, we will really be able to unearth the cycles behind the Citizenship Complex and understand that American citizenship means at different times in our country’s history.

Subject:
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and Identity through the Lens of a Presidential Campaign
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Educational Use
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The unit will teach elements of civics and democracy through the lens of the Presidential election. Students will be asked to research, read, and write about various aspects of civics and democracy, using a wide array of multimedia resources that will include (but not be limited to) literature, music, visual arts, and technology. The goal of the unit is to help students understand the importance of voting and participation while building their knowledge of the election system. The unit will encourage your students to think about government in a new way and connect this remarkable election to their day to day lives. While this unit will be taught during the first marking period, the unit will work at any point throughout the next few years. It is a Social Studies based unit designed for middle school students, primarily in the sixth grade, but can be modified and adapted to fit high school curriculum, grades nine through twelve.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and its Ability to Change Lives
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Educational Use
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This curriculum unit focuses on children as citizens, and how they can claim ownership of their citizenship. Overall the unit works its way through the rights that children have as citizens and how they can use them to their advantage. It starts with what it means to them to be citizens, two specific rights that they have, and finally how they will use those rights to better their lives. The two rights that we discuss in this unit are education and voting. Those rights are the focus of this unit because I believe that they are the most important to young children and that they will benefit them the most in the long term. Education will provide the foundation for all of their learning throughout their lives, and voting is something that education prepares them for and will later in life affect their community and potentially the nation. I also believe that having an understanding of how voting actually impacts this country could potentially interest them in being active politically in the future.

Subject:
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Civics
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Civics is the study of our national government, constitution, and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Topics include democracy and other forms of government; legislative, executive, and judicial functions; the political process; and foreign and domestic policies. It also includes a summary of Washington State History and local native sovereignty.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
10/23/2017
Civics, Foundations of Government
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Social Studies Targets:Forms of governmentNature/Purposes of governmentIdeologies of governmentComparative governmentEconomic systems and governmentLearning Targets:Understand how the world is organized politically and nations interact (civics)Identify the differences in philosophy, structure, and the nature of different types of government (civics)Understand the role of sovereignty in the development of different governments and within governments (civics)Compare and contrast democracies with other forms of government.(civics)Understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities including problem solving and decision making at the local, state, and international level. (civics)Understand how cultural forces and factors influenced and were influenced by changes in government (Cultural Geography)Identify ways that power can be distributed geographically within a state (Physical Geography)Identify the different types of economic systems (Economics)Understand how different government and economic systems influence one another (Economics)Students will recognize and analyze the ideologies inherent in different economic systems. (Economics)

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Conversations with History: An Editor's Odyssey, with Lewis H. Lapham
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Harper's Editor Emeritus Lewis Lapham for a discussion of his career and the history of Harper's Magazine. Lapham compares print to electronic media, analyzes the corruption of language by politics, and reflects on the incompatibility of democracy and empire. He concludes with a devastating critique of the Bush administration and its impeachable offenses. (59 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
12/05/2010
Conversations with History: Comparing Rich Democracies, with Harold L. Wilensky
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Conversations with History and host Harry Kreisler welcome Harold Wilensky, Professor Emeritus of Political Science at UC Berkeley, to talk about his recently published book, Rich Democracies: Political Economy, Public Policy, and Performance. In this landmark work, Wilensky compares rich democracies and explores what makes these modern societies distinct and what makes them alike. (55 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/11/2007
Conversations with History: Foreign Policy in a Democracy, with Peter Tarnoff
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U.C. Berkeley's Harry Kreisler welcomes diplomat Peter Tarnoff for discussion of the evolution of U.S. foreign policy from the height of the Cold War through the Clinton Administration. (56 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
10/14/2003
Conversations with History: Islam and Democracy, with Akbar Ganji
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Iranian journalist and human rights activist Akbar Ganji for a discussion of the dynamics of change in Iran. Topics covered include the Iranian Revolution in comparative context, the problem of establishing democracy in Islamic societies, power in Iran, and U.S. Iranian Relations. Ganji also talks about his work as an investigative journalist in Iran and his political imprisonment. (59 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
10/03/2010
Conversations with History: Militarism and the American Empire, with Chalmers Johnson
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Distinguished social scientist and public intellectual Chalmers Johnson, President of the Japan Policy Institute, joins host Harry Kreisler for a conversation on the nature of the American Empire and its costs and consequences for the future of American democracy and power in the world. (58 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
05/11/2008