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Contemporary Literature: British Novels Now
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What is Britain now? Its metropolises are increasingly multicultural. Its hold over its distant colonies is a thing of the past. Its sway within the global political arena is weak. Its command over Northern Ireland, Wales, and Scotland is broken or threatened. What have novelists made of all this? What are they writing as the old empire fades away and as new social and political formations emerge? These are the questions that will concern us in this course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Philosophy
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brouillette, Sarah
Date Added:
02/01/2007
Critical Perspectives on Migration in the Twenty-First Century
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CC BY-NC
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Thousands of people risk their lives daily by crossing borders in search of a better life. During 2015, over one million of these people arrived in Europe. Images of refugees in distress became headline news in what was considered to be the worst humanitarian crisis in Europe since 1945. This book provides a critical overview of recent migration flows and offers answers as to why people flee, what happens during their flight and investigates the various responses to mass migratory movements. Divided in two parts, the book addresses long-running academic, policy and domestic debates, drawing on case studies of migration in Europe, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific. Coming from a variety of different fields, the contributors provide an interdisciplinary approach and open the discussion on the reasons why migration should be examined critically.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
E-International Relations
Author:
Jakob Steiner
Laura Southgate
Marianna Karakoulari
Date Added:
03/08/2019
Diccionario de la inmigración y la Otredad en las Américas en el siglo XXI
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Tiene como objetivo ser fuente de consulta amigable y visual para un público diverso, interesado en las expresiones sociales contemporáneas, particularmente para los estudiosos del tema que puedan poner en contexto la migración de los países latinoamericanos sin restringirla exclusivamente al cruce entre México, Centroamérica y los Estados Unidos.

[Translation:] "Dictionary of Immigration and Otherness in the Americas in the 21st Century"

Its aim is to be a friendly and visual source of reference for a diverse audience interested in contemporary social expressions, particularly for scholars of the subject who can contextualize the migration of Latin American countries without exclusively restricting it to the crossing between Mexico, Central America, and the United States.

In addition to terminology associated with migration and immigration, this Spanish-language dictionary contains profiles of all countries in the Americas, showing patterns of migration, summarizing immigration laws, and including an example of migration-related art or literature for each country.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Araceli Hernandez-Laroche
Flor Urbina Barrera
Hernandez-Laroche
Urbina Barrera
Date Added:
01/26/2024
EconGuy Videos: Immigrants and Jobs
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Many people think that immigrants take jobs from Americans. But is that true? Turns out there isn't a fixed number of jobs to be fought over by Americans and immigrants. Immigrants actually end up creating more jobs for Americans - find out how.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Saint Michael's College
Provider Set:
EconGuy Videos
Author:
Patrick Walsh
Date Added:
11/29/2013
The Economics of Immigration: A Story of Substitutes and Complements
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Educational Use
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America is a nation of immigrants, who currently make up about 13 percent of the overall population. The May 2014 issue shows how immigration affects the average American. The essay weighs the costs and benefits of immigration and discusses the concept of immigrant workers as substitutes for and complements to native-born workers.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Page One Economics
Author:
Scott A. Wolla
Date Added:
10/09/2014
English Language Arts, Grade 12
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CC BY-NC
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The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues
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Who decides who among us is civilized? What rules should govern immigration into the United States? Whom should we let in? Keep out? What should we do about political refugees or children without papers? What if they would be a drain on our economy?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest and write a short argument about who in the play is truly civilized.
Students participate in a mock trial in which they argue for or against granting asylum to a teenage refugee, and then they write arguments in favor of granting asylum to one refugee and against granting it to another.
Students read an Independent Reading text and write an informational essay about a global issue and how that relates to their book.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What role do national identity, custom, religion, and other locally held beliefs play in a world increasingly characterized by globalization?
How does Shakespeare’s view of human rights compare with that in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
Who is civilized? Who decides what civilization is or how it’s defined?
How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues, Contemporary Issues, Discussing Xenophobia
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In this lesson, students will write about how their Independent Reading book addresses the unit’s Guiding Questions, and they’ll share their responses with a partner. Students will begin writing a narrative about a time when they were afraid. They’ll also discuss xenophobia.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues, Contemporary Issues, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will share their drafts of their fear narratives and give feedback in small groups. They’ll have class time to revise and complete a final draft. They’ll revisit the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to see what the document says about immigrants and refugees.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Examining Identity and Assimilation
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Educational Use
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Examine identity and assimilation with an activity that asks the essential question: Was there ever a part of your identity you had to hide?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Ethnic Studies
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
07/06/2009
Exploring Young Immigrant Stories
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Educational Use
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This lesson helps students appreciate diversity among their peers and the diversity of immigrants all over the world. Through hands-on exercises, students will discover similarities and differences they share with other children.

Subject:
Education
English Language Arts
Language Education (ESL)
Physical Geography
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
09/12/2016
Family Immigration History Research Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Marc Shoichet for Grade 10 Global History Course; Adaptable to other grades. During the year, we explore world history by analyzing the causes of events, understanding why they occurred, and comparing these events as well as the outcomes; in this end-of-year assignment we explore the relationship of our families/ancestors and neighborhood changes to the events of world history.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
09/26/2019
Foreigners Are Our Friends: Free Trade and Open Borders
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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According to Professor Bryan Caplan of George Mason University, many people suffer from "anti-foreign bias", believing that countries should prioritize goods made within their own borders and limit immigration to preserve jobs for citizens. In this video, Professor Caplan explains how trade and immigration actually increase wealth for everyone.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Bryan Caplan
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Frameworks of Urban Governance
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Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education…). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kobes, Deborah
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Frenchness in an Era of Globalization
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This course approaches the question of what constitutes Frenchness in today's era of globalization through issues of memory, belonging, and cultural production. It explores the role of timeless traditions – common technologies, an internationally-spoken language, monuments open to the world, and foods such as wine and cheese – that remain quintessentially French. The course also covers recent scandals about France's role in the world, such as its colonial identity and Dominique Strauss-Kahn's New York debacle.
Taught in French.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Languages
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Clark, Catherine
Date Added:
09/01/2016
Gender, Race, and the Construction of the American West
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This course explores how gender shaped the historical experiences and cultural productions in the North American West during the time it was being explored, settled, and imagined. The North American West of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries provides a fascinating case study of the shifting meanings of gender, race, citizenship, and power in border societies. As the site of migration, settlement, and displacement, it spawned contests over land, labor disputes, inter-ethnic conflicts and peaceful relations, and many kinds of cultural productions.
The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies (GCWS)
This course is part of the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies. The GCWS at MIT brings together scholars and teachers at nine degree-granting institutions in the Boston area who are devoted to graduate teaching and research in Women's Studies and to advancing interdisciplinary Women's Studies scholarship. Learn more about the GCWS.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Literature
Political Science
Reading Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hansen, Karen
Johnson, Marilynn
Rudnick, Lois
Date Added:
09/01/2014
Gendering U.S. Immigration Policy: Sociopolitical, Theological and Feminist Perspectives
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This course uses theories of gender to explore sociopolitical, ethical and theological perspectives on immigration policy, with a focus on the U.S. The course begins with an overview of global developments in the feminization of migration and ethical and policy dilemmas that are specific to the current era.

Subject:
Gender and Sexuality Studies
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Hee An, Choi
Kretsedemas, Philip
Date Added:
02/01/2019
Global Media Perspectives
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This kit provides the materials and background information needed to engage students in a dynamic and constructive process of learning how global media perspectives differ based on country of production, media source, target audience, and political and social context. There are five lessons representing important issues and media documents from: Africa (news and documentary film clips about the food crisis), Latin America (editorial cartoons about immigration), Europe (news and documentary film clips about Islam and cultural identity), India (magazine covers about India's rise in the global economy), and Southeast Asia (websites concerning Islamic majorities and minorities).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Film and Music Production
Journalism
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
04/30/2013