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Conversations with History: An Editor's Odyssey, with Lewis H. Lapham
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Harper's Editor Emeritus Lewis Lapham for a discussion of his career and the history of Harper's Magazine. Lapham compares print to electronic media, analyzes the corruption of language by politics, and reflects on the incompatibility of democracy and empire. He concludes with a devastating critique of the Bush administration and its impeachable offenses. (59 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
12/05/2010
Conversations with History: The Power of Words and the Power over Words
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Annabel Patterson, Professor Emeritus of English, Yale University for a discussion of her career as a literary scholar. The discussion focuses on the challenges of understanding literature in its historical and social context. Her work on censorship, Shakespeare, and her current research on the use of words in the American political dialogue are some of the topics addressed in the conversation. (59 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Linguistics
Literature
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
07/21/2007
Cultural and Linguistic Differences: What Teachers Should Know
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This Module examines the ways in which culture influences the daily interactions that occur across all classrooms and provides practice for enhancing culturally responsive teaching (est. completion time: 1 hour).

Subject:
Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/04/2018
Dante in Translation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The course is an introduction to Dante and his cultural milieu through a critical reading of the Divine Comedy and selected minor works (Vita nuova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia, Epistle to Cangrande). An analysis of Dante's autobiography, the Vita nuova, establishes the poetic and political circumstances of the Comedy's composition. Readings of Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise seek to situate Dante's work within the intellectual and social context of the late Middle Ages, with special attention paid to political, philosophical and theological concerns. Topics in the Divine Comedy explored over the course of the semester include the relationship between ethics and aesthetics; love and knowledge; and exile and history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Giuseppe Mazzotta
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Databases and SQL
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This unit discusses the purposes of databases, a relational database, and the querying language SQL. Students will design a simple database using data modeling and normalization. This unit will define basic data operations, provide instruction on how to create common query statements, and discuss SQL implementation.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Open Michigan
Provider Set:
Health IT Workforce Curriculum
Author:
Oregon Health & Science University
Date Added:
09/26/2014
Discover Psychology 2.0 - A Brief Introductory Text
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This textbook presents core concepts common to introductory courses. The 15 units cover the traditional areas of intro-to-psychology; ranging from biological aspects of psychology to psychological disorders to social psychology. This book can be modified: feel free to add or remove modules to better suit your specific needs.

This book includes a comprehensive instructor's manual, PowerPoint presentations, a test bank, reading anticipation guides, and adaptive student quizzes.

Subject:
Psychology
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Cara Laney
David M. Buss
David Watson
Edward Diener
Elizabeth F. Loftus
Emily Hooker
George Loewenstein
Henry L. Roediger III
Jeanne Tsai
Kathleen B. McDermott
Mark E. Bouton
Max H. Bazerman
Richard E. Lucas
Robert Siegler
Robert V. Levine
Ross Thompson
Sarah Pressman
Sudeep Bhatia
Susan T. Fiske
Yoshihisa Kashima
Date Added:
12/08/2016
ENG 220: Introduction to Language and Culture
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Course InformationCourse Description: ENG 220. Introduction to Language and Culture (3).  Introduction to the study of language with a particular focus on American Englishes, including the history of American English. Focus is on cultural influence on language across the US and how the use of language is associated with power. Study of the basic building blocks of language. Study of variations of language across cultures and contexts, including contemporary and historical spoken, written, and digital registers and genres of American English. Examination of the effects of technology, culture, and context on language. Textbook & Course MaterialsRequired TextOur text for this course is the FREE, OER text More Than Words. You may access this text by clicking the Textbook tab in the course navigation. You may order a printed version of the text Links to an external site., but please keep in mind that you will need the digital version to access digital interactive content, such as videos.All other materials will be provided for you free of charge within the course via  open links to internet sources and sources available via the YC Library.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Karen Palmer
Date Added:
12/10/2022
ESOL Course Layout: Level 2 Integrated Skills
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CC BY
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The following is a course layout for Spring terms of ESOL 20: Level 2 Integrated Skills. It is based on the OER Entry into English 2 by Penny Jahrous and Sara Packer. All activity links are either from Entry into English 2 by Penny Jahrous and Sara Packer licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.

This class plan is based on using Theme 3 for Spring terms. I assigned one theme to each term because each theme covers the assigned grammar breakdowns for Southeast Campus based on the units of the English in Action 2, 3rd Edition textbook. I supplemented Weeks 1&2 with materials from Entry into English 2 Theme 1 and materials I created. Those weeks are fully backward planned as an example of how to use EIE2 to meet course objectives. For Weeks 3-10, I broke down Theme 3 week by week.

All instructors: This course layout is intended for a 9-hour/week, 10 week term. The content of Entry into English 2 can be easily spread over 3 terms.

Subject:
Education
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Author:
Lara Mendicino
Date Added:
03/15/2023
Early literacy: Promote children's early language and communication skills
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CC BY
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The Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) defines literacy as ‛the capacity, confidence and disposition to use language in all its forms’. It can include talking, listening, viewing, reading, writing, music, movement, dance, storytelling, visual arts, media and drama. Children develop a wide range of literacy skills in the early years, from infancy through to the start of school, which form the foundation for reading, writing and communicating. Early literacy approaches aim to promote the development of these foundational skills.
Evidence-based practices for promoting early literacy in early childhood care and education settings are listed. Some of the examples offered may not apply in all contexts and/or may be more suitable for particular learners or age groups.

Subject:
Early Childhood Development
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Australian Education Research Organisation
Date Added:
06/20/2023
Education 151: Language and Literacy (English)
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CC BY-SA
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This course is designed to help students understand the aspects of linguistic principles and processes that underlie oral and written language proficiency, and how this knowledge is relevant K-12 instruction. Emphasis is on a thorough, research-based understanding of phonology, morphology, orthography, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Students learn ways to use this information to support literacy and oral language development for elementary and secondary school students. Issues of linguistic diversity and second language learning are addressed.

Subject:
Linguistics
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Penelope Collins
Date Added:
01/14/2019
Embracing Diversity and English Language Development (ELD) in Your Program for administrators
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This course for Administrators provides knowledge and skills in supporting diverse families and enhancing English LanguageDevelopment (ELD) across expressive and receptive language domains for school-age children who are English Language Learners (ELL) or have other learning and language barriers. Administrators learn about  key standards and best practices and explore strategies to implement improved practice, creating a shift in policies and programmatic culture to embrace and support diverse learners, welcoming non-native English speaking families and enhancing the ELD progress of students who are learners of English.

Subject:
Education
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Elise Scott
Susan Vinovrski
Date Added:
10/14/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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CC BY-NC
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
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In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Setting the Stage, How is an argument structured?
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What is the best way to convince people that you are right? In this lesson, students will look at the structure of the Declaration of Independence, examining how the argument is constructed.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing
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CC BY-NC
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This unit uses William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing as a vehicle to help students consider how a person is powerless in the face of rumor and how reputations can alter lives, both for good and for ill. They will consider comedy and what makes us laugh. They will see how the standards of beauty and societal views toward women have changed since the Elizabethan Age and reflect on reasons for those changes. As students consider the play, they will write on the passages that inspire and plague them and on topics relating to one of the themes in the play. Finally, they will bring Shakespeare’s words to life in individual performances and in group scene presentations.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing .
Students read two Shakespearean sonnets and excerpts from an Elizabethan morality handbook dealing with types of women, and they respond to them from several different perspectives.
For each work of literature, students do some writing. They learn to write a sonnet; create a Prompt Book; complete a Dialectical Journal; and write an analytical essay about a topic relating to a theme in the play.
Students see Shakespeare’s play as it was intended to be seen: in a performance. They memorize 15 or more lines from the play and perform them for the class. Students take part in a short scene as either a director or an actor.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What are society’s expectations with regard to gender roles?
Does humor transcend time? Do we share the same sense of humor as our ancestors?
How do we judge people?
How important is reputation?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT (Cold Read)

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

CLASSROOM FILMS

The Branagh version of Much Ado About Nothing is available on DVD through Netflix and for streaming through Amazon. Other versions are also available on both sites.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing, How Do We Judge People?, Informational Writing
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CC BY-NC
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The purpose of this second Benchmark Assessment (Cold Write) is to determine what students know about informational writing. Students will respond to a writing prompt, and you will score results as a measure of progress. Following this assessment, students will practice conducting close analysis of various passages from Much Ado About Nothing and continue their character analysis by writing a Perfect Paragraph.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution
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CC BY-NC
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People often say that mankind should learn from history. Charles Dickens, whose books are considered classics, set his novel A Tale of Two Cities in the past. He wanted his readers to learn from the bloody French Revolution and from the widespread brutality in London. Both cities (Paris and London) offer the reader a glimpse into dark and dangerous times. As students read about Dickens's Victorian setting and learn his view of the French Revolution, they will think about what makes a just world. Students will have a chance to think about their own experiences, and, using techniques they have learned from Charles Dickens, they will do some writing that sends a message about your own world.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

To complete the unit accomplishments, students will:

Read the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities.
Read several short pieces, including a biography of Dickens and excerpts from other literature, to help them understand Dickens’s world and the world of the novel.
Explore new vocabulary to build their ability to write and speak using academic language.
Practice close reading and participate in several role plays and dramatic readings to help them experience the dramatic writing style of Charles Dickens.
Write a vignette and a short narrative piece, and practice using descriptive detail and precise language.
Write a reflection about the meaning of Dickens’s novel.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How does good storytelling affect the reader, and how can a good story promote change in the world?
What was the Victorian view of gender roles?
How can power be abused?
What is loyalty ? What are the limits of loyalty?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, Dickens as Storyteller, Messages Through Images
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, you will talk about the ways in which images send social and political messages to the reader.In this lesson, students will talk about the ways in which images send social and political messages to the reader.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, The Rebels, Mood Establishment In Scenes
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will review the ways in which Dickens establishes a mood in the scenes in Paris, creating suspense and shaping the readers’ opinions of the Revolution. They will also review the way the “two cities” (London and Paris) compare.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015