Updating search results...

Search Resources

70 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • native-americans
History of Survivance: Upper Midwest 19th-Century Native American Narratives
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

For every object that ends up in a library or museum collection – whether it’s a manucript, a photograph, or something more approaching the concept of “art” – there is a narrative, a story that gets told. The story a visitor to an exhibit ends up hearing, of course, is dependent upon who is telling the story and the slant of their own perspective. When the subject of the exhibit is Native Americans in the Upper Midwestern United States during the extraordinary upheaval of the 19th century, one must be particularly careful about the story being told since the narrative that largely exists is one of cultural denouement, of endings, as told by a colonizing population to its descendants. The dominant narrative of the demise of traditional Native American culture in the face of colonization, conversion to Christianity, confinement to reservations and economic collapse is, however, not the only story that can be told. The accounts of the lives of Native Americans during the 19th century that are told by Native peoples themselves are strikingly different to those recounted in history books, movies, and all too frequently in museums. Rather than narratives solely recounting destruction and demise, Native stories about Native history tend to focus on what White Earth Ojibwe scholar Gerald Vizenor has called survivance – a narrative incorporating themes of survival and resistance that insist on the inclusion of the Native presence. The following is an exhibit of resources that can be found within the Digital Public Library of America retold through the lens of Native American survivance in the Minnesota region. Within are a series of objects of both Native and non-Native origin that tell a story of extraordinary culture disruption, change and continuity during 19th c., and how that affects the Native population of Minnesota today. This exhibit was created by the Minnesota Digital Library.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
A History of Treaties and Reservations on the Olympic Peninsula, 1855-1898
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

The curriculum materials in this packet are intended to provide middle- and high-school teachers with the background and basic tools they need to develop and incorporate lessons about Indian-white relations in Washington into existing lessons about the history of the United States and Washington. This packet focuses on the treaty negotiations and the establishment of reservations on the Olympic Peninsula that took place in the last half of the 19th century, but it also provides a broad overview of how relations between Indian nations and the United States government evolved in the first hundred years of the nation's history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of Washington
Provider Set:
Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest
Date Added:
02/16/2011
The Homestead Act of 1862
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson recounts efforts to improve homesteading laws and make land ownership possible for more settlers. The distribution of government lands had been an issue since the Revolutionary War. Preemption -- settling the land first and paying for it later -- became national policy; however, supporting legislation was stymied until the secession of Southern states. See one of the first applications for land under this law. Teaching activities are included.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
12/13/2005
How is History Recorded? The Lewis and Clark Journals and Lakota Winter Counts
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, students read two primary documents from the early 1800s: a journal entry from the Lewis and Clark expedition and a Lakota Indian "winter count" calendar. Using an analysis worksheet, students identify key ideas and details from the documents, while also examining the craft and structure of each document. They draw upon both the content and form of the documents to make inferences about the respective cultures of Euro-Americans and Native Americans in the early 1800s.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
11/21/2019
Hunting Deer: Sharing the Harvest
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Greg Johnson is a hunter and traditional craftsman. In Hunting Deer, he shares how and why hunting is so important to his family and to his communityŐs health and way of life. He discusses how treaty rights for hunting allow his people to continue their traditional relationship with the natural world, including both respect for and dependence on the deer for food, crafts and traditional art.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
The Ways
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
09/13/2013
Indian Families and Child Welfare: A Training Curriculum
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

This module supports the guidelines of the Indian Child Welfare Act. It provides information on overcoming Indian families' fundamental mistrust and engaging families appropriately; how federal Indian policy affects Indian communities: Indian culture, traditions, family, and child rearing; the role of extended family systems and community networks for reservation and non-reservation Indians; the premise and guidelines of the ICWA and related federal and state laws that govern the implementation of the ICWA: the notion that the best interests of the Indian child are served by the tribes; collaborating with tribal workers; the role of cultural factors in risk assessment of Indian child welfare cases; community resources and skills in networking within the Indian community and within rural Indian community settings; skills in a variety of social work methods; and the differences between particular tribes. (236 pages)Becker, I., Daly, D., Gross, B., Robertson, G., Robinson, M., Casey, D., et al. (2000).

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Author:
CalSWEC
Date Added:
03/01/2018
Indian Mounds of Mississippi
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

is a guide to these mounds, built between 100 B.C. and 1700 A.D. to bury important members of tribes and to serve as platforms for temples or residences of chiefs. This website highlights 11 mound sites and includes itineraries and three essays that provide historical context for these sites.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/10/2003
Iowa Early History Glaciers to Settlement: Unit 5 Black Hawk's Story & Tribal Movements out of Iowa
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

For Iowa History- Learn about Black Hawk's Story & Tribal Movements out of Iowa• Video narrative written by Sandra Kessler Host researcher, author, and curat...

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Dee Engstrom
Sandra Host
Date Added:
06/07/2021
The Iron Horse vs. the Buffalo: Indian-Settler Conflict on the Great Plains
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, students read a series of primary source documents, including the 1872 print "American Progress," that depict the social, political and cultural conflicts between settlers and Native Americans during the 19th century. Then, working in small groups, students will consider the events from the perspective of Native Americans, and create an illustration to counter George A. Crofutt's famous print of "American Progress" moving across the Great Plains.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
Social History for Every Classroom
Date Added:
11/21/2019
Jacksonian Democracy?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This collection uses primary sources to explore Jacksonian democracy. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Adena Barnette
Date Added:
10/20/2015
Lady Thunderhawks: Connecting the Culture
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

The Lady Thunderhawks are the Oneida Nation High School girls basketball team. Jessica House, a senior and captain of the team, considers how the team supports her identity as a member of her community and the Oneida Nation. The story explores the role of the basketball team in the community and highlights the importance of language and culture in school.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
The Ways
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
12/05/2013
Lake Superior Whitefish: Carrying on a Family Tradition
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Lake Superior Whitefish shares the story of the Petersons, a commercial fishing family in Hancock, Michigan. Pat Peterson explains how treaties made with the U.S. government protect her peopleŐs right to hunt and fish in the ceded territories that once belonged to them. Though they initially faced opposition and prejudice when they moved to the area to fish, this family business is now an integral part of the community.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
The Ways
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
01/10/2013
Language Apprentice : Bringing Back the Ho-Chunk Language
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Arlene Blackdeer, a language apprentice for the Hoocak Waaziija Haci Language Division of the Ho-Chunk Nation, shares her experience in her community's effort to bring back the Ho-Chunk language. The apprentice program pairs young people with elder native speakers to improve their language skills. These apprentices then go on to teach language classes in the schools and surrounding community. The story highlights the role of elders in the community in passing on cultural knowledge, and the language revitalization efforts currently under way.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
The Ways
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
04/24/2013
Lesson 1 1850-1874 The Nebraska Kansas-Act
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is part of a larger collection of lessons developed by NET - Nebraska Studies project work and accompany website. To see all of the lessons use the keyword search "Nebraska Studies".

Summary
Lesson 1 has a variety of activities and materials related to The Nebraska Kansas Act.

There are a variety of activities and materials that can be used with students of various grade levels. All of these items are tied to the NET Nebraska Studies Timeline materials which are shown and linked throughout the lesson. Teachers are not intended to use all of the contents within this lesson but to pick which activities or materials they would prefer to use with their students depending on the teachers needs. Most of the materials are shown within the lesson and/or have external links to the content or other content which may be helpful to the lesson's activities or materials.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Date Added:
06/20/2018
Lesson 2 Native Americans & Settlers
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson is part of a larger collection of lessons developed by NET - Nebraska Studies project work and accompany website. To see all of the lessons use the keyword search "Nebraska Studies".

Lesson 2 has a variety of activities and materials related Native Americans and Settlers within Nebraska from 1850 - 1874.

There are a variety of activities and materials that can be used with students of various grade levels. All of these items are tied to the NET Nebraska Studies Timeline materials which are shown and linked throughout the lesson. Teachers are not intended to use all of the contents within this lesson but to pick which activities or materials they would prefer to use with their students depending on the teachers needs. Most of the materials are shown within the lesson and/or have external links to the content or other content which may be helpful to the lesson's activities or materials.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Date Added:
06/20/2018
The Lewis and Clark Expedition
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson presents 13 documents and photos related to the 1804-6 expedition into the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. The documents include a list of Indian presents Lewis purchased, his receipts for wine and tobacco, Jefferson's letter to Madison announcing the purchase of Louisiana, and Jefferson's message to Congress communicating the discoveries of the expedition.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
08/07/2000
Living Language: Menominee Language Revitalization
Read the Fine Print
Rating
0.0 stars

Living Language shares Ron Corn Jr.'s attempt to teach his daughter, Mimikwaeh, to be a first language speaker of the Menominee language. This story explores the relationship between culture and language. Language revitalization is a struggle for the Menominee, because most families speak English as a first language and are no longer able to pass their native language on to their children. Ron and MimkwaehŐs language journey may be one the last chances to keep the Menominee language alive.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Primary Source
Provider:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Provider Set:
The Ways
Author:
Wisconsin Media Lab
Date Added:
11/13/2012
Living in Washington: Geography, Resources, and Economy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

The unit is focused on the examination of geography in terms of “place.” Students dive into inquiry to answer the compelling question, What is unique about living in Washington? Through this question students will understand where and why people live in Washington State. Students will dive into the regions of Washington State and define it through many characteristics. Students will ultimately choose a region to become an expert on and communicate what makes that region unique. Each student’s performance task product will reflect choice and build upon student strengths according to their skill set.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Education
Elementary Education
English Language Arts
History
Social Science
U.S. History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Simulation
Student Guide
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
06/30/2017
Manifest Destiny
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This collection uses primary sources to explore the idea of Manifest Destiny and its influence. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
01/20/2016
Maps of Indian Territory, the Dawes Act, and Will Rogers' Enrollment Case File
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson encourages students to study a variety of documents to understand the impact of a particular piece of legislation and relates to the powers granted to Congress in Article I, Section 8 , of the Constitution, related to making laws. It correlates to the National History Standards and the National Standards for Civics and Social Sciences. It also has cross-curricular connections with with history, government, global studies, and music.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
General Law
Law
Material Type:
Case Study
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
07/21/2000