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African American Civil Rights Movement in Oklahoma
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African Americans have a long history in Oklahoma. They first came to Oklahoma during the forced removal of American Indians because some tribes held African Americans as slaves. There were also African Americans who were American Indian and free. During the Civil War, many of these men in Indian Territory joined the war on both the Union and Confederate sides. Called Buffalo Soldiers, these African American servicemen played a vital role in Oklahoma and Indian Territory as well as in other regions of the West. Both the 9th and the 10th Cavalries and the 24th Infantry served in Indian Territory during the latter nineteenth century. Stationed at Fort Gibson, the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteers Infantry Regiment (later supplemented with the 2nd Kansas) fought at Cabin Creek and at the pivotal engagement of Honey Springs in July 1863. After the Civil War ended in 1865, all of the slaves in the United States, including Indian Territory, were freed. Known as freedmen, many continued living among the Indians.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Oklahoma Historical Society
Date Added:
06/19/2020
African American Soldiers in World War I
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the experiences of African American Soldiers in World War I. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Building Inclusive Cities: Tackling Urban Inequality and Segregation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Urban design, inequality and segregation are strongly connected.

Cities around the world, from the Global South to the Global North, are facing a rise in inequality and socio-economic segregation. The wealthy are increasingly concentrating in the most attractive urban areas and poverty is spreading to the suburbs. Rising levels of segregation have major consequences for the social sustainability of cities and leads to unequal life opportunities depending on where in the city you live.

In this course, aimed at a broad range of professionals, from urban planners and architects to geographers, you will learn what the main drivers and indicators of urban inequality and segregation are, using examples from cities from all over the world. You will learn how segregation is measured, how to interpret the results of the analyses of segregation and how to relate these insights to urban design. With this knowledge, you will be able to analyze how these issues may be affecting your local environment.

Additionally, we will present some historical examples of how urban design has played a role shaping spatial inequality and segregation in a selection of case study cities. This will help you to get a better understanding of how urban design can reduce spatial inequality and segregation.

The course is taught by the editors of the new SpringerOpen book “Urban socio-economic segregation and income inequality. A global perspective” and senior experts from the Urban Design section of TU Delft, which is ranked number 2 in the QS World University Rankings in the field of Architecture.

Subject:
Applied Science
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Leo van den Burg
Maarten van Ham
Tanja Herdt
Date Added:
01/17/2023
Burke Marshall
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As an assistant attorney general in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, Burke Marshall played a key role in the federal government's efforts to desegregate the South. Representing the presidential administrations of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, Marshall mediated conflicts between civil rights protesters and southern white officials. In this interview, Marshall recalls the 1961 Freedom Rides and the 1962 desegregation of the University of Mississippi.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
Teachers' Domain
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Busing & Beyond: School Desegregation in Boston
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore school desegregation in Boston. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Ella Baker and the SNCC
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Learn the story of Ella Baker, the unsung hero of the civil rights movement who founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960, in this video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
PBS
The WNET Group
Date Added:
01/30/2023
The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin
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CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Literature
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Freedom Riders Challenge Segregation
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Educational Use
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In this video segment adapted from American Experience: "Freedom Riders," watch newsreel footage, archival photos, and interviews to explore how Freedom Riders made efforts to end the segregation of African Americans in the Southern United States. Even after the U.S. Supreme Court had ruled that the segregation of black and white riders on interstate buses was unconstitutional, Southern states continued to enforce local segregation laws. In response, members of both races decided to force the issue and challenge illegal segregation by riding together in buses headed to the South.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Author:
American Experience
Date Added:
01/30/2023
Freedom Rides
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CC BY-NC
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The students will analyze the 6 primary resource image frames. The Jamboard activity focuses on the Civil Rights Movement’s Freedom Riders. In 1961, this group of volunteer participants rode interstate buses throughout the segregated southern United States. Their goal was to challenge the United States Supreme Court ruling “Separate but Equal” which was used to mandate separate black and white waiting rooms at the interstate bus stations. The last frame connects the fight for Civil Rights to the massive Black Lives Matter movement in Richmond, Virginia. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Woodson Collaborative
Date Added:
02/28/2023
Getting an Education
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Educational Use
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This video segment, adapted from NOVA, chronicles the education of leading chemist Percy Julian. Although Julian began his elementary school years in the Deep South under Jim Crow laws, he became one of the few African Americans of his time to earn a Ph.D.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
History, Law, Politics
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Author:
The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Date Added:
02/12/2007
Ida B. Wells and Anti-Lynching Activism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Ida B. Wells and anti-lynching activism. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Samantha Gibson
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Inaugural address of Governor George Wallace
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Inaugural address of Governor George Wallace, which was delivered at the Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama on January 14, 1963. In the speech Wallace makes his famous statement against integration: "Today I have stood, where once Jefferson Davis stood, and took an oath to my people. It is very appropriate that from this Cradle of the Confederacy, this very Heart of the Great Anglo-Saxon Southland, that today we sound the drum for freedom as have our generations of forebears before us done, time and again through history. Let us rise to the call of freedom-loving blood that is in us and send our answer to the tyranny that clanks its chains upon the South. In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny...and I say...segregation now...segregation tomorrow...segregation forever."

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
ADAH Digital Collections
Author:
George Wallace
Date Added:
01/14/1963
Introduction to Sociology 2e
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Introduction to Sociology 2e adheres to the scope and sequence of a typical, one-semester introductory sociology course. It offers comprehensive coverage of core concepts, foundational scholars, and emerging theories, which are supported by a wealth of engaging learning materials. The textbook presents detailed section reviews with rich questions, discussions that help students apply their knowledge, and features that draw learners into the discipline in meaningful ways. The second edition retains the book’s conceptual organization, aligning to most courses, and has been significantly updated to reflect the latest research and provide examples most relevant to today’s students. In order to help instructors transition to the revised version, the 2e changes are described within the preface.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
02/01/2012
“Let my people in”: Unwritten Covenants and Housing Segregation in the 1950s
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This is a History lesson plan on housing segregation and restrictive covenants in the United States during the 1950s. It is suitable for grades 9 and up. The focus of this lesson is a primary source from Alan Paton available from History Matters. There are also Algebra and English lessons connected to this lesson as noted in this plan.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
03/27/2015
Media Constructions of Martin Luther King, Jr.
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This kit explores the ways in which King and his legacy have been portrayed in various media forms. The first lesson follows a chronology of King's life through interactive decoding of rich media documents (comic books, billboards, songs, music videos, etc.). The following lessons use excerpts of Dr. King's speeches from 1963, 1967 and 1968 to examine his views on social change; explore the portrayal of King in magazine covers, advertisements, Web sites, film clips and monuments; and use letters to the editor about celebrating King to explore challenges to change.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Andrea Volckmar
Barry Derfel
Chris
Christopher Carey
Cyndy Scheibe
Eric Acree
Faith Rogow
Kim Fontana
Lauren Trichon
Moira Lang
Robin Rosoff
Sox Sperry
Sperry
Tanya Saunders
Date Added:
04/30/2013
Modern African History
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course surveys the history of 19th and 20th century Africa. It focuses on the European conquest of Africa and the dynamics of colonial rule, especially its socioeconomic and cultural consequences. It looks at how the rising tide of African nationalism, in the form of labor strikes and guerrilla wars, ushered out colonialism. It also examines the postcolonial states, focusing on the politics of development, recent civil wars in countries like Rwanda and Liberia, the AIDS epidemic, and the history of apartheid in South Africa up to 1994. Finally, it surveys the entrepreneurship in the post-colonial period and China's recent involvement in Africa.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mutongi, Kenda
Date Added:
02/01/2019
Neighborhood Redlining, Racial Segregation, and Homeownership
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Educational Use
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Redlining was the practice of selectively classifying neighborhoods as most likely to default on repayment of a mortgage loan. Houses in redlined neighborhoods held little value as collateral, and lenders would only offer mortgage loans for these houses at above-average interest rates. Over time, these neighborhoods had the largest concentrations of African Americans. The September 2021 issue of Page One Economics® explains how residents in redlined neighborhoods could not afford to become homeowners and accumulate wealth at the rates other groups did. It also points out how only when the federal government passed laws banning discrimination in housing and banking did the segregation of African Americans to specific neighborhoods start to ease up.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Economics
Finance
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Page One Economics
Author:
Diego Mendez-Carbajo
Date Added:
09/01/2021