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Animals of the Chinese Zodiac
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In this lesson plan, students will learn about the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac. In the introductory first lesson, they will see how animals are often used as symbols. In the second lesson, they will hear one of several versions of how the 12 animals were chosen. They will then focus upon a few of the animals in the story and see how they can be used as symbols of certain human characteristics. In the third lesson, they will be introduced to the other animals of the zodiac, and they will be given a chart on which they will assign traits to each animal. Then they will consult a number of websites to find the traits traditionally associated with the animals, which they will add to their list. Then, they will come up with a number of ways to compare and contrast the animals in the list. In the third lesson, they will focus upon the animal associated with the year of their birth, learning about its traits and discussing whether or not these apply to themselves and their peers. Finally, each student will make an acrostic, combining the letters of his or her first name with adjectives that relate to his or her zodiac sign.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
12/06/2011
Böcklin, Self-Portrait with Death Playing the Fiddle
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Arnold Böcklin, Self-Portrait with Death Playing the Fiddle, 1872, oil on canvas, 75 x 61 cm (Alte Nationalgalerie, Berlin). Created by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker.

Subject:
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
SmartHistory
Date Added:
11/07/2012
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, The American Short Story
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In this unit, students will explore great works of American literature and consider how writers reflect the time period in which they write. They will write two literary analysis papers and also work in groups to research and develop anthologies of excellent American stories.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and analyze stories from several 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century American authors. After researching a time period, they select stories from that period to create an anthology. The readings enhance their understanding of the short story, increase their exposure to well-known American authors, and allow them to examine the influence of social, cultural, and political context.
Students examine elements of short stories and have an opportunity for close reading of several American short stories. During these close readings, they examine the ways that short story writers attempt to explore the greater truths of the American experience through their literature.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

If you were to write a short story about this decade, what issues might you focus on?
What defines a short story? Just length?
To what extent do these stories reflect the era or decade in which they were written?
To what extent are the themes they address universal?

CLASSROOM FILMS

History.com has short videos on the Vietnam War (“Vietnam” and “A Soldier's Story”).

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, The American Short Story, Symbol and Motif, Images and Slogans of the American Dream
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In this lesson, students will revisit the American Dream in Unit 1. In pairs, they will find images and slogans to use as the basis for a collage that represents their view of the American Dream.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Figurative Language Review SoftChalk Lesson
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This is a SoftChalk lesson reviewing the figurative language terms simile, metaphor, personification, imagery, and symbolism.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Literature
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Lesson
Reading
Author:
Wendy Ryun Arch
Date Added:
08/19/2018
From Fiction to Facts of Life
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Fiction is untrue, but it can be an honest reflection of real life. In this seminar, you will make clear connections between the lives of characters in fiction to the lives of people in the real world. This will require a skill called abstracting in which you find patterns in one area and apply them to a new situation. It will also give you the opportunity to reflect on how fake worlds of literature can help resolve your own personal issues that you face currently and in the future.StandardsCC.1.3.9-10.C - Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.CC.1.3.9-10.E - Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it and manipulate time create an effect.CC.1.3.9-10.H - Analyze how an author draws on and transforms themes, topics, character types, and/or other text elements from source material in a specific work.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Deanna Mayers
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
10/14/2017
Game Design
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An historical examination and analysis of the evolution and development of games and game mechanics. Topics include a large breadth of genres and types of games, including sports, game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games, roleplaying games, and digital games. Students submit essays documenting research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams required to design, develop, and thoroughly test their original games.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Graphic Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fernandez-Vara, Clara
Juul, Jesper
Rusch, Doris
Tan, Philip
Date Added:
02/01/2008
Gaudí, Sagrada Família
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Antoni Gaudí, Church of the Sagrada Família or Basílica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família Basilica, 1882- (consecrated 2010, but still under construction), Barcelona, Spain. Created by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker.

Subject:
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
SmartHistory
Date Added:
11/16/2012
Khnopff, I Lock My Door Upon Myself
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Fernand Khnopff, I Lock My Door Upon Myself, 1891 (Neue Pinakothek, Munich) Speakers: Dr. Beth Harris & Dr. Steven Zucker. Created by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker.

Subject:
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
SmartHistory
Date Added:
12/31/2012
Lions, Dragons, and Nian: Animals of the Chinese New Year
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The most important festival in the Chinese calendar is the New Year or Spring Festival. One of the annual events used to commemorate the festival is a colorful parade complete with animated dragon and lion figures.

In the first activity the student will learn the major differences between Eastern and Western dragons and discover why Eastern dragons are associated with Chinese New Year. They will hear a story about how the dragons came to rule major rivers of China. In the second activity, they will also learn about the Chinese New Year Dragon Parade and discover why firecrackers are used to drive off evil spirits, especially one called the Nian. In the third activity the students will see images of parading dragons, including sound-enhanced video and read poems about the New Year. In the fourth lesson the students will discover that the Chinese lion has imaginary characteristics similar to the dragon. They will view images of the lion and hear about how this highly stylized beast once fought the ferocious Nian. They will learn about the lion dancers in the New Year parade and compare them to the dragon dancers. Finally they will make their own lion masks.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/28/2010
Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" Speech
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Students will display their understanding of the symbolism and references that Dr. King used to enrich his famous speech on August 28, 1963 from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by constructing a "jackdaw," a collection of documents and objects.

Subject:
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Charlotte Lammers
Date Added:
06/09/2000
Munch, The Storm
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Edvard Munch, The Storm, 1893, oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 51 1/2" (91.8 x 130.8 cm), (MoMA) Speakers: Dr. Juliana Kreinik, Dr. Amy Hamlin. Created by Beth Harris and Steven Zucker.

Subject:
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
SmartHistory
Date Added:
11/16/2012
The Oregon State Guide to English Literary Terms
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This free video series provides definitions of literary terms in English literature to students and teachers. It also offers examples of how these literary devices can be applied to poems, plays, novels, and short stories. We are in the process of translating the videos into Spanish and many of them now contain these subtitles.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Oregon State University
Author:
Oregon State University
School of Writing Literature and Film
Date Added:
03/06/2020
Reading Poetry
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“Reading Poetry” has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, occasional lecture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Literature
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Vaeth, Kim
Date Added:
02/01/2009
School House Rock Analysis
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This resource was created by Jason Smith, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Arts ESU2
Date Added:
11/01/2021