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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze h...
7th Grade Historical Literacy Units
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7th Grade Historical Literacy consists of two 43 minute class periods. Writing is one 43 minute block and reading is another. The teacher has picked themes based on social studies standards, and a read-aloud novel based on social studies serves as the mentor text for writing and reading skills. More social studies content is addressed in reading through teaching nonfiction reading skills and discussion.
Standards reflect CCSS ELA, Reading, and Social Studies Standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
04/15/2019
Careers: What Will Future Jobs Look Like?
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Students will examine how technology is changing or eliminated careers that currently exist. Students will draw conclusions and develop hypotheses about these current careers and the changes that could possibly occur based on technology.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
05/09/2021
Grade 6-8 Inquiry: Differentiate between Fact and Assumption
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This inquiry by Cynthia Yurosko, Evergreen Public Schools, is based on the C3 Framework inquiry arc. The inquiry provides students with the opportunity to analyze, through the evaluation of words, how conflicts between the U.S. government and Native American tribes arose. Students will be asked to investigate federal reports, speeches, and news reports to discern U.S. leaders’ perspectives and compare these biases to the words of Native American leaders Chief Red Eagle and Chief Tecumseh.

Subject:
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Washington OSPI OER Project
Jerry Price
Cynthia Yurosko
Date Added:
12/28/2020
Grade 7 ELA Module 1
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In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Find the rest of the EngageNY ELA resources at https://archive.org/details/engageny-ela-archive .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
Identifying Media Bias in News Sources for Middle School
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Every media source has a story to tell--a driving purpose. The media that people consume largely shapes their world views. The US public is becoming more divided partially due to the consumption of increasingly biased news. As a critical consumer of media, It is important to be able to separate fact from opinion. In this unit, adapted from the high school version, students will become critical consumers of news, by identifying media bias in order to become better informed citizens.  NOTE: This unit has been adapted for use at the middle school level from the resource Identifying Media Bias in News Sources by Sandra Stroup, Sally Drendel, Greg Saum, and Heidi Morris.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Journalism
Political Science
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Game
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Amanda Schneider
Megan Shinn
Heidi Morris
Sally Drendel
Sandra Stroup
Date Added:
05/13/2021
Japanese American Relocation Centers: Fear at Home
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This activity was produced in conjunction with The Library of Congress and the TPS at Metropolitan State University of Denver. This activity will allow learners to:Draw conclusions about relocation centers used during WW2 in the western US.Analyze primary resources using a question method to discover details.Discuss the concept of fear and why others may be treated differently due to fear and prejudice. Short lesson plan introducing Japanese American relocation centers (or internment camps) using primary resources from Library of Congress. The lesson focuses on a newspaper article about the center in Hunt, Idaho and a photo of a toddler from the Manzanar camp. Can be used before teaching the book Farewell to Manzanar.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Amy Armstrong
Date Added:
11/17/2022
PEI SOLS Middle School Wetlands: Ecosystem Services
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Coastal wetlands bring many benefits to ecosystems including their ability to sequester carbon and mitigate fluctuations in sea levels. Students will understand the ecosystem benefits of coastal wetlands with a focus on the potential of estuaries for climate related planning.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
Re-historying the life and work of Anna Murray Douglass
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Lesson plans and resources for a complete expedition, or several week unit, on the life and times of Anna Murray Douglass. This unit presents multiple avenues and opportunities to expand and complicate the often limiting depictions of Black women in history, using Anna Murray Douglass and her remarkable accomplishments as a focal point. Created by Rebekka Boysen-Taylor.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Marco Seiferle-Valencia
Rebekka Boysen-Taylor
Date Added:
05/05/2020
Territory and Treaty Making: A study of Tribes, Westward Expansion, and Conflict
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CC BY
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This unit is focused on the examination of a single topic, in this case, the Native Americans of the inland Northwest and conflict that arose when other non-native people started to settle in the northwest, and to specifically address the native populations that lived in the inland northwest. The materials were created to be one coherent arc of instruction focused on one topic. The module was designed to include teaching notes that signal the kind of planning and thinking such instruction requires: close reading with complex text, and specific instructional strategies or protocols are described that support students’ reading and writing with evidence are described in enough detail to make it very clear what is required of students and how to support students in doing this rigorous work. Materials include summative assessment of content and process, central texts, key resources, and protocols that support and facilitate student learning.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
02/16/2018