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Ancient Nubia - Unit Overview
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CC BY
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These educational videos provide an invaluable resource on Ancient Nubia for Middle and High School Ancient World History and Geography teachers and students. The video content aligns with Geography, Economics, Civics, and Historical Thinking Social Studies standards across the nation. Key concepts and inquiry skills from each content area weave seamlessly throughout the videos and associated lesson plans. This unit overview document links to developed resources on the Archeology in the Community site.

Subject:
Physical Geography
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Washington OSPI OER Project
Jerry Price
Date Added:
08/24/2022
Anthropology: World Archaeology Syllabus
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CC BY-NC
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ANTH 150 World Archaeology
Introduction to archaeology and cultural change from the earliest times to the advent of state-level societies.

Course Description:
• When did we become fully modern humans?
• When (and why) did we stop being hunter-gatherers?
• When did inequality emerge?
• Why did some people decide to start living in cities?
• What led to the development of complex state-level
societies?
These are important questions about what it means to
be human that archaeologists address. In this course,
we’ll consider these topics while providing an
introduction to archaeology and the study of world
prehistory. The course provides an overview of human
prehistory from modern humans up to the
development of literate civilizations. The approach will
be problem oriented and comparative. We will
consider ancient cultures from around the world in
order to foster an appreciation for human cultural
diversity. Explaining why cultural developments
occurred is often hotly debated among archaeologists,
and different perspectives will be explored critically
throughout this course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Dr. Alison Carter
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Archaeology & Society
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Pomona College -- fall 2022

Word Count: 33688

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Anthropology
Applied Science
Archaeology
History
Information Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Date Added:
08/01/2022
Biological Anthropology Laboratory BASIC WORKBOOK
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CC BY
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Short Description:
Laboratory activities in this workbook are presented as chapters each of which could either be highly specialized, or generic. The approach and the level of difficulty will vary based on instructors’ preferences and more importantly availability and quality of the materials and equipment available in the laboratory.

Long Description:
Each laboratory activity follows a lecture which is envisioned to provide additional detailed information (already mostly or partially covered in a textbook assigned by a professor for Biological Anthropology theory course) regarding scheduled topics to be covered in the laboratory by offering further and in-depth guidance needed for the laboratory setting.

Word Count: 5432

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Anthropology
Archaeology
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Pressbooks
Date Added:
05/31/2022
Caistor dig
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CC BY-SA
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Date Added:
03/21/2017
Caistor dig
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Date Added:
03/22/2017
Ceramic Mending Activity
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CC BY
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Mending is an important part of archaeology, as it can be used to establish relationships between different parts of an archaeological site. This resource is a tutorial detailing how to perform a ceramic mending activity with your students. Use it to support Maryland Math Standard 7.G.B.4-6 for grade 7 by focusing on the mending of round ceramics and determining their circumference or diameter from pieces. If you evaluate this resource or use it, please consider responding to this short (4 question) survey bit.ly/3rw0WQY

Subject:
Archaeology
Art History
Arts and Humanities
Geometry
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Ciència oberta i arqueologia
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CC BY
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Aproximació general a la definició de ciència oberta i als seus pilars bàsics i presentacio  de les principals institucions i/o plataformes digitals relacionades amb la ciència oberta i l’arqueologia a nivell internacional, europeu i català.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Author:
Laura Tomàs Valldepérez
Date Added:
12/12/2020
Conflicted Antiquities
Restricted Use
Copyright Restricted
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Conflicted Antiquities is a rich cultural history of European and Egyptian interest in ancient Egypt and its material culture, from the early nineteenth century until the mid-twentieth. Consulting the relevant Arabic archives, Elliott Colla demonstrates that the emergence of Egyptology—the study of ancient Egypt and its material legacy—was as consequential for modern Egyptians as it was for Europeans. The values and practices introduced by the new science of archaeology played a key role in the formation of a new colonial regime in Egypt. This fact was not lost on Egyptian nationalists, who challenged colonial archaeologists with the claim that they were the direct heirs of the Pharaohs, and therefore the rightful owners and administrators of ancient Egypt’s historical sites and artifacts. As this dispute developed, nationalists invented the political and expressive culture of “Pharaonism”—Egypt’s response to Europe’s Egyptomania.

Subject:
History
Social Science
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Duke University Press
Author:
Elliott Colla
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Conserving Waterlogged Wood
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CC BY
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This video resource is presented as a real-world application of chemistry in the field of conservation archaeology. Conservator, Francis Lukezic, walks through the conservation practices for waterlogged archaeological wood and explains the chemical and cellular processes at work. Use to support Maryland/NGSS for Grades 5, MS, and HS. For 5-PS1-1 and MS-PS1-1, have students watch or perform the paper clip demonstration and discuss how the hydrogen bonding of water allows this then is disrupted by the soap; have students develop diagrams explaining the phenomenon of surface tension on the molecular level. For HS-PS2-6, have students watch or perform the sponge demonstration and discuss how the molecular structure of the wood makes it vulnerable to becoming waterlogged then brainstorm materials that are more resilient to water and discuss the uses of the materials. For interdisciplinary connections to geography and history, have students research why Maryland archaeologists do or do not discover the materials brainstormed instead of wood. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey bit.ly/3DhRumA

Subject:
Archaeology
Chemistry
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Create Your Own Time Capsule
Read the Fine Print
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Create Your Own Time Capsule is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they build a time capsule to help future generations understand how they lived. The activity begins with a brief explanation of artifacts and time capsules.Students are then given step-by-step directions for how to select significant items and build a time capsule to store them. As an example, two kids and the time capsules they built are shown.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Digging into Archaeology: A Brief OER Introduction to Archaeology with Activities
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CC BY-NC
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This book is intended for use in a variety of introductory archaeology settings, such as in lectures and lab courses. This text can complement an existing traditional text or completely replace a standard text. It can be used for its activities or as a study resource. When we wrote this text, we designed the chapters to be brief, providing concise and to-the-point information. This book is not intended to replace lectures or direct instruction from an instructor; rather, it supports learning in a variety of settings and formats. The book can be printed in whole, read digitally, or used piecemeal in either format. However you use this text, we hope that you find it serves as an instructive learning tool and that you dig archaeology as much as we do!

Subject:
Archaeology
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Amanda Walcott Paskey
AnnMarie Beasley Cisneros
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Education and Home Life for Black Sharecroppers in Southern Maryland (1870s-1920s)
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CC BY
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Consider the need for home education for Black and African-American families in Southern Maryland in the 1870s through 1920s, when public education was unavailable or inaccessible. This resource combines 3D models and 2D interaction to introduce students to Alphabet Wares/Alphabet Plates as found at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum when excavating "Sukeek's Cabin," a late-19th century home by a newly-freed family on the park grounds. Themes include unjust limitations, archaeology as a primary source, and home life in the 1870s-1920s. The resource includes simple prompts and resources for hypothesizing about archaeological findings, researching them, drawing conclusions, and suggestions for further reflection.

This resource uses Genial.ly, an online-presentation service, with additional tools by S'CAPE to increase the interactivity. Public Genial.lys may be remixed into new presentations after signing up for an account with the service.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. More of our content can be found on OER Commons, YouTube, and SketchFab. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Arts and Humanities
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
04/18/2022
Experimental Archaeology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Imagine trying to cut your hair without metal tools. How would you do it? Join JPPM's Educator Nate Salzman as he uses experimental archaeology to answer the question "How did Native Americans cut their hair before metal tools?" Use to support the Maryland Social Studies Framework for grades 3, 4, and High School. To support the grade 3 content topic "Cultural Change Over Time," have students compare the advantages/disadvantages of the results of this experiment and how they receive a hair cut; for grade 4 topic "Native Cultures," have students either hypothesize and research how Native American tribes who did not have access to shells may have cut their hair or respond to the prompt "why did European colonists use metal tools for cutting their hair while the Native Americans used shells? Would some hair styles be easier to cut with one type of tool than the other?"; finally for HS topic "Exploration, Colonization, and Global Interaction, have students respond to the prompt "with the introduction of metal tools, how might the role of 'barber' have changed within a Native American tribe? If you evaluate or use this resource, consider responding to this short (4 question) survey at bit.ly/3G6RxUa

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Arts and Humanities
Ethnic Studies
History
Social Science
World Cultures
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/02/2021
Gender stereotypes in archaeology
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This booklet is a short but informative and critical response by archaeologists to various gender stereotypes that exist in the archaeological explanation of the past, as well as in the contemporary disciplinary practice.

The booklet includes 24 commonly encountered gender stereotypes in archaeology, explained and deconstructed in 250 words by archaeologists with expertise on gender in the past and in contemporary archaeology, most of them being members of the Archaeology and Gender in Europe (AGE) Community of the European Association of Archaeologists. In addition, the stereotypes are beautifully illustrated by Serbian award-winning artist Nikola Radosavljević.

Subject:
Archaeology
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Bisserka Gaydarska
Uroš Matić
Laura Coltofean-Arizancu
Date Added:
03/23/2022
Geologic Time, Fossils, and Archaeology: Content Knowledge for Teachers
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CC BY-SA
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This article provides links to web sites about geologic time, fossils, and the archaeology and culture of the Arctic for elementary teachers.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Geoscience
Physical Science
Space Science
Technology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
Date Added:
10/17/2014
 The Global Water Challenge
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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As global population grows, so does the demand for water. Yet less than one percent of the planet’s supply is potable, and estimates suggest that 40% of humanity will not have access to clean water by 2025. Explore the complex issues surrounding this precious resource in this episode of America Abroad.

America Abroad is an award-winning documentary radio program distributed by Public Radio International (PRI) and broadcast on public radio stations nationwide. Each month, we take an in-depth look at a critical issue in international affairs and U.S. foreign policy.

To learn more visit http://www.americaabroad.org

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Date Added:
02/21/2013
How to apply paper artifact labels
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, walks through applying acid-free paper labels to artifacts. This is an alternative to labelling artifacts with permanent archival ink, and the tutorial is appropriate for both students and professional education. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, both paper and digital, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Applied Science
Archaeology
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
11/17/2021
How to pack artifact bags and boxes
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Walk through how to pack artifacts in bags and boxes for curation and storage with Sara Rivers-Cofield, Curator of Federal Collections, and Alice Merkel, Collections Assistant, at the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory. In addition, tips are offered as to how best to arrange boxes to simplify handling and, as always, best protect artifacts. The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) standards and guidelines for preparing artifact collections and their associated records, for permanent curation at the lab can be found at https://jefpat.maryland.gov/Documents/mac-lab/technical-update-no1-collections-and-conservation-standards.pdf

The MAC Lab is a state-of-the-art archaeological research, conservation, and curation facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, the State Museum of Archaeology. The MAC Lab serves as the primary repository for archaeological collections recovered from land-based and underwater projects conducted by state and federal agencies throughout Maryland.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Archaeology
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
03/30/2022