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19th Century Immigration - Causes & Effects
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Public Domain
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Students will examine and interpret a population chart published in 1898 — depicting changes in the makeup of the United States across time in three categories, “foreign stock,” “native stock,” and “colored” — as well as an 1893 political cartoon about immigration. Students will also explain the causes and effects of population change in the late 19th century.

Subject:
Mathematics
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
8th grade: My place in history
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator: Michael Freydin: Adaptable to other grades. Cumulative assignment for the end of the year. During previous lessons, student have evaluated their own place in history, and in our nation’s history. This final project builds on their understanding of history by conduct an interview to connect neighborhood/family history to world history events.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
07/27/2019
AP World/H4 Family History Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator: Sean McManamon to meet NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence  for World History. Adaptable to other grades. Cumulative assignment for the end of the year. Assignment asks students to connect family history interview to World History periodization.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
09/25/2019
AP World History: Japanese Internment Project
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator David Richman for his AP World History course. Adaptable to US History. Adaptable to other grades. Assignments ask students research the effects Executive Order 9066 had on families of Japanese descent, to analyze primary sources, and to create an illustrated story book detailing Ms. Wakatsuki’s time spent at Manzanar, a Japanese internment camp.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Date Added:
09/28/2019
The African American “Great Migration” and New European Immigration
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the factors that prompted African American and European immigration to American cities in the late nineteenth centuryExplain the discrimination and anti-immigration legislation that immigrants faced in the late nineteenth century

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Samuel Finesurrey
Date Added:
05/24/2020
After Ellis Island
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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A PowerPoint presentation that takes students through a choose-your-own adventure style activity simulating the life choices of Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th/early 20th century.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Simulation
Date Added:
03/16/2018
America by the Numbers
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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America by the Numbers with Maria Hinojosa, a PBS documentary series produced by the Harlem-based Futuro Media Group, reveals how dramatic changes in the composition and demographics of the United States are playing out across the country.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Learning for Justice
Date Added:
09/29/2014
American Me: My Story, Their Story and Our Story
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Kenneth Porter for his Senior Leadership class. We all have different stories, reasons and various paths that we personally took or our relatives traversed to arrive at this nation of ours. This assignment tasks the student with researching the story of a relative/guardian who emigrated to this country. The student will learn the when, the what, the why and the how behind their story, in order to reveal to the student more about their own story.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
09/25/2019
Angel Island & The Chinese Exclusion Act
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This lesson provides students with an introduction to Angel Island. The lesson begins with students completing a timeline of Chinese immigration to America. The progression of events will help them understand the escalation of anti-Chinese sentiment in America culminating with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the first law that restricted immigration based on nationality.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 8.7, 8.8, HS.1, HS.2
Historical Knowledge: 8.22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.63, HS.64, HS.65
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.30, 8.31, 8.32, HS.67, HS.69
Social Science Analysis: 7.28, 8.33, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
Border Walls
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CC BY-SA
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This inquiry examines the 20th century history of migration from Mexico to the United States and recent efforts to limit the movement of people across the southern U.S. border. The inquiry takes its inspiration from a 2018 podcast episode by Malcom Gladwell titled, “General Chapman’s Last Stand.” The podcast is part of Gladwell’s Revisionist History series (http://revisionisthistory.com). In the podcast, Gladwell tells the story of General Leonard F. Chapman Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, who went on to serve as the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) from 1972 to 1975. Chapman is credited with reforming the INS into a more efficient and effective agency, but Gladwell argues that Chapman’s efforts also led to an unintentional increase in unauthorized immigrants. In 1970, 760,000 Mexican immigrants, or 1.4% of Mexico’s population, lived in the U.S. By 2008, there were 12.7 million Mexican immigrants in the U.S. which amounted to 11% of all people born in Mexico; an increase of almost 800% in less than 30 years. The question of how and why this happened is the central focus of this inquiry.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
03/11/2019
Chinese Exclusion Act
Read the Fine Print
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Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Chinese Exclusion Act and the Exclusion of Asians, Pacific Islanders & Chinese Women
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Signed on May 6th, 1882 by President Chester A. Arthur, the Chinese Exclusion Act was the first law to explicitly limit immigration based on race. This lesson is designed to go further in exploring the causes and effects of the Chinese Exclusion Act through analysis of primary and secondary sources. The purpose is to showcase the conditions in the US that led to a rise in xenophobia, and in turn, race-based policies that defined the Chinese American and Asian American experience in the United States. The lesson will also have students engage in critical thinking through research and a class discussion comparing and contrasting the Chinese Exclusion Act and current immigration policies or proposed immigration policies.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 5.1, 6.4, 7.5, 8.7, 8.8, HS.1, HS.2, HS.9, HS.10
Economics: 7.8
Geography: 5.13, HS.51
Historical Knowledge: 5.22, 6.20, 6.21, 8.22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.64
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.31, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 5.26, 5.27, 6.24, 6.26, 8.34, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/02/2023
Chinese Massacre of 1871 – Connecting the Past with the Present
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this lesson, students will learn about the Los Angeles Chinatown Massacre of 1871. They will examine the attitudes and policies of the time which led to the Massacre. Students will learn about recent acts of anti-Asian violence and make connections between the Chinese Massacre and recent anti-Asian violence and attacks.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: 3.2
Economics: 4.4
Historical Knowledge: 5.22
Historical Thinking: 4.19, 5.24
Social Science Analysis: 3.17, 3.18, 4.21, 4.24, 5.27, 5.28, 5.29

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
01/24/2023
Chinese Massacre of 1871: Not an Isolated Event
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this lesson, students will learn about the Los Angeles Chinese Massacre of 1871, and identify the causes by examining the attitudes and policies of the time. They will learn about and analyze other massacres that have occurred in the United States in order to gain a better and more nuanced understanding of how and why these acts of violence occur. Lastly, students will research the process for reparations and consider how to address and rectify the harm of such injustices.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: HS.2, HS.9
Geography: HS.42, HS.51
Historical Knowledge: 6.20, 6.21, 8,22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.53, HS.64, HS.65
Historical Thinking: 7.25, 8.30, 8.31, HS.67, HS.68
Social Science Analysis: 6.24, 6.26, 6.27, 6.28, 7.27, 7.28, 7.29, 7.30, 8.33, 8.34, 8.36, HS.71, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74, HS.75

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/01/2023
Columbus and the Clash of Cultures
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Educational Use
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In small groups and class discussion, students share knowledge about Christopher Columbus and his voyages, learn about the impact of Columbus, and consider some ecological and political results of the encounter.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Maxine Phillips
Date Added:
10/08/2014
Critical Perspectives on Migration in the Twenty-First Century
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CC BY-NC
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Thousands of people risk their lives daily by crossing borders in search of a better life. During 2015, over one million of these people arrived in Europe. Images of refugees in distress became headline news in what was considered to be the worst humanitarian crisis in Europe since 1945. This book provides a critical overview of recent migration flows and offers answers as to why people flee, what happens during their flight and investigates the various responses to mass migratory movements. Divided in two parts, the book addresses long-running academic, policy and domestic debates, drawing on case studies of migration in Europe, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific. Coming from a variety of different fields, the contributors provide an interdisciplinary approach and open the discussion on the reasons why migration should be examined critically.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
E-International Relations
Author:
Jakob Steiner
Laura Southgate
Marianna Karakoulari
Date Added:
03/08/2019
Diccionario de la inmigración y la Otredad en las Américas en el siglo XXI
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CC BY-NC
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Tiene como objetivo ser fuente de consulta amigable y visual para un público diverso, interesado en las expresiones sociales contemporáneas, particularmente para los estudiosos del tema que puedan poner en contexto la migración de los países latinoamericanos sin restringirla exclusivamente al cruce entre México, Centroamérica y los Estados Unidos.

[Translation:] "Dictionary of Immigration and Otherness in the Americas in the 21st Century"

Its aim is to be a friendly and visual source of reference for a diverse audience interested in contemporary social expressions, particularly for scholars of the subject who can contextualize the migration of Latin American countries without exclusively restricting it to the crossing between Mexico, Central America, and the United States.

In addition to terminology associated with migration and immigration, this Spanish-language dictionary contains profiles of all countries in the Americas, showing patterns of migration, summarizing immigration laws, and including an example of migration-related art or literature for each country.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Araceli Hernandez-Laroche
Flor Urbina Barrera
Hernandez-Laroche
Urbina Barrera
Date Added:
01/26/2024
EconGuy Videos: Immigrants and Jobs
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Many people think that immigrants take jobs from Americans. But is that true? Turns out there isn't a fixed number of jobs to be fought over by Americans and immigrants. Immigrants actually end up creating more jobs for Americans - find out how.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Saint Michael's College
Provider Set:
EconGuy Videos
Author:
Patrick Walsh
Date Added:
11/29/2013
The Economics of Immigration: A Story of Substitutes and Complements
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Educational Use
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America is a nation of immigrants, who currently make up about 13 percent of the overall population. The May 2014 issue shows how immigration affects the average American. The essay weighs the costs and benefits of immigration and discusses the concept of immigrant workers as substitutes for and complements to native-born workers.

Subject:
Economics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Page One Economics
Author:
Scott A. Wolla
Date Added:
10/09/2014