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1904 World’s Fair—Exhibition of the Igorot Filipino People
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After the Philippine-American War ended in 1902, Americans became fascinated by the natives of the newly acquired territory, which led to the development of anthropological exhibits showcasing what “primitive” life was like in the Philippines. During this time period, anthropologists adopted an evolutionary perspective rooted in white superiority. One of the exhibits featured the Igorot people, who anthropologist Albert Jenks believed were the most uncivilized tribe in the Philippines. These exhibits/human zoos sparked the creation of negative stereotypes of both the Igorot people and the Filipino community. Students will view the video segment from Asian Americans and engage in activities and discussions to explore the power of perception and its impact on shaping the identities of Asian Americans. Students will also examine the U.S. politics and scientific theories that shaped the perception of Americans and sought to justify U.S. colonization in the Pacific and the mistreatment of the Filipino community.

2021 Social Science Standards Integrated with Ethnic Studies:
Civics and Government: HS.2, HS.9
Historical Knowledge: 5.22, 6.20, 6.21, 8.22, 8.25, HS.52, HS.63, HS.64
Historical Thinking: 5.24, 7.25, 8.31, HS.67, HS.70
Social Science Analysis: 5.26, 5.27, 6.24, 7.27, 8.33, 8.34, 8.36, HS.72, HS.73, HS.74, HS.78

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
The Asian American Education Project
Date Added:
02/02/2023
American Empire
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The United States is no stranger to strange lands. From its founding as a British colony to its settlement of the West, America is rooted in a tradition of exploration, conquest, and opportunism. The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries marked a new era in American expansion. A growing US economy was hungry for more resources and new markets. Politicians pressured the government to protect and promote American interests worldwide. An expanding population was redefining American society. Each of these factors contributed to the age of American imperialism—an era of unprecedented territorial and political growth and cultural development. Following the Spanish-American War of 1898, the US emerged as a formidable world power with territories across the Pacific and Caribbean. Of course, these new borders came with growing pains. As US imperialists insisted that the country had a responsibility to civilize "inferior" peoples, opponents lobbied on behalf of the colonies, insisting that imperialism contradicted the nation's founding principles of sovereignty, equality, and democracy.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Andrea Ledesma
Date Added:
10/28/2022
Analyzing  The Roots & Effects of New Imperialism Though Historical Documents of Different Perspectives
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Description: The attached unit has incorporated Media Literacy for Social Studies by scaffolding a variety of primary source document activities of varying perspectives on New Imperialism (1850-1914) which allow the studnt to identify possible bias or misinformation. The guided questions which accompany the primary sources ask the student to explain differing responses and to think critically about why those responses may be different depending on the context. 

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Emily Wilson
Date Added:
06/29/2020
Civilization and Imperialism Sample Assignments
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This resource contains a series of sample assignments including: second-hand source excerpts about civilization with critical questions, instructions for a project about art traditions in Asia, instructions for a project about imperialism with a written and visual component, and instructions for a document-based essay about imperialism.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
01/27/2024
Consequences of Industrialization, State Expansion 1750-1900
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This lesson plan is from a unit titled Consequences of Industrialization. It explores the expansion of imperial states from 1750-1900 and the methods of that expansion. The lesson also focuses on how imperial powers have dealt with the negative consequences of imperialism on indigenous peoples in recent years. 

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Alliance for Learning in World History
Date Added:
02/02/2024
Conversations with History: Britain and America and the Making of the Modern World
Read the Fine Print
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Conversations with History host Harry Kreisler welcomes Walter Russell Mead of the Council on Foreign Relations for a discussion of the Anglo American maritime system—its origins, development, and impact on the world. The conversation touches on the unique synergy between Protestant religion and capitalism, the consolidation of Anglo American power in the process of transforming the international system, the importance of culture in international politics, and the need for a dialogue of civilizations in the 21st century. (57 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Political Science
Religious Studies
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
01/07/2007
Cuba’s Anglo-American Colony in Times of Revolution (1940-1961) – Samuel Finesurrey Ph.D.
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This digital archive is an aid in understanding how British, Canadian and especially U.S. nationals managed and, on occasion, challenged informal empire in 1940s and 1950s Cuba. Cuba’s Anglo-American Colony in Times of Revolution documents how, in the context of revolution, contact between Cubans and U.S. nationals–as well as a smaller number of British and Canadian residents–reproduced existing hierarchies, while simultaneously creating new empathies. Cuba’s Anglo-American residents managed informal empire by developing and cultivating economic, political and cultural authority on the island. These privileged outsiders were able to exert dominance through socioeconomic partnerships with Cuban powerbrokers. However, Anglo-American educators, journalists, missionaries, politicians, executives, mobsters and philanthropists crafted a diverse, and often contradictory set of alliances with Cubans. In the context of revolution, where their Cuban colleagues, classmates, students, parishioners, friends and family risked their lives and their privilege for a “new” Cuba, a significant segment of Anglo-American residents entered into cross-cultural solidarities with revolutionary actors. Based on the personal commitments they developed with Cubans, many U.S., British and Canadian nationals residing in Cuba struggled for a socioeconomic and political transformation of Cuban society, both before the revolution ousted the Batista government and after the revolutionary government had consolidated power. This archive centers a new set of actors, institutions, and relationships in the narrative of the Cuban Revolution.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Data Set
Primary Source
Author:
Samuel Finesurrey
Date Added:
01/10/2022
Economics in U.S. History
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Economics in U.S. History is comprised of seven lessons and is designed to introduce students to basic economic concepts through analyzing diverse perspectives on the subject. Students will be engaged in a dynamic, interactive, and constructivist process of exploring media representations of economic issues in U.S. history. Such issues include the free market, industrialization, and The Living Wage Campaign. The kit will teach students to identify the Ě_Ě_€ÝlanguageĚ_Ě_ĺ of construction of different media forms and to analyze and evaluate the meaning of mediated messages about economics. This kit was designed for 8th grade U.S. history, but the document-decoding approach can be adapted for and used from middle school through high school.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
History
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Chris Sperry
Cindy Kramer
Date Added:
05/09/2013
Global Perspectives on Industrialization
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This course will focus on the emergence and evolution of industrial societies around the world. The student will begin by comparing the legacies of industry in ancient and early modern Europe and Asia and examining the agricultural and commercial advances that laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution. The student will then follow the history of industrialization in different parts of the world, taking a close look at the economic, social, and environmental effects of industrialization. This course ultimately examines how industrialization developed, spread across the globe, and shaped everyday life in the modern era. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify key ideas and events in the history of industrialization; identify connections between the development of capitalism and the development of modern industry; use analytical tools to evaluate the factors contributing to industrial change in different societies; identify the consequences of industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries in different societies; critique historical interpretations of the causes and effects of industrialization; and analyze and interpret primary source documents describing the process of industrialization and life in industrial societies. (History 363)

Subject:
Economics
History
Social Science
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Industrialization and imperialism
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Thinking about how the Industrial Revolution(s) and capitalism helped catalyze far-flung imperialism during the 1800s.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sal Khan
Date Added:
07/26/2021
Intercultural Learning: Critical Preparation for International Student Travel
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International student exchanges are an increasingly popular aspect of the internationalisation of higher education around the globe. Whether as short-term mobility projects or semester long ‘study abroad’ opportunities, the benefits of such international study experiences have been well documented.

Higher education institutions, departments and disciplines, or individual academics are often tasked with preparing students for such international experiences. Such preparation often focuses on the practical and logistical aspects of student travel, overlooking a crucial dimension of student learning.

Intercultural learning: Critical preparation for international student travel aims to take students beyond practical preparation, to equip them with a critical lens through which to view and understand their international experiences. The book leads students toward a deeper understanding of culture and cultural difference through an exploration of challenging concepts such as imperialism, racism, privilege and intercultural practice.

As an adjunct to traditional approaches, the book adds a significant and valuable dimension to the process of preparing students for international study, increasing the potential for meaningful and transformative learning experiences.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
UTS ePress
Author:
Debra Miles
Narayan Gopalkrishnan
Peter Jones
Date Added:
01/01/2018
Japanese Imperialism
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An overview of Japanese Imperialism in the 19th and 20th centuries. Discussion of imperial powers in East Asia, the Opium Wars and the Meiji Restoration.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sal Khan
Date Added:
07/26/2021
Kipling, the Elton John of his age?
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Professor Elleke Boehmer discusses why Kipling's writing, and his poetry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in particular, launched him to international fame across the British Empire. By comparing him to contemporary popular figures such as Elton John and Paul McCartney, she offers insight into how Kipling's verse captured the popular imagination of the common people throughout the age of imperialism. This audio recording is part the Interviews on Great Writers series presented by Oxford University Podcasts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Elleke Boehmer, Dominic Davies
Date Added:
10/08/2012
MAIN Causes of World War I
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This is a short lesson on what are the four MAIN causes of World War I.  MAIN stands for militarism, alliance, imperialism, and nationalism.

Subject:
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Joseph Broadus
Date Added:
04/06/2020
Nature, Environment, and Empire
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This class examines the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and exploration and exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harriet Ritvo
Date Added:
10/22/2011
Opium Wars
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The British wage two wars on China to have better access to Chinese markets, especially to sell opium grown in British India.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sal Khan
Date Added:
07/26/2021
People and Other Animals
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This class provides a historical survey of the ways that people have interacted with their closest animal relatives, for example: hunting, domestication of livestock, exploitation of animal labor, scientific study of animals, display of exotic and performing animals, and pet keeping. Themes include changing ideas about animal agency and intelligence, our moral obligations to animals, and the limits imposed on the use of animals.

Subject:
Anthropology
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harriet Ritvo
Date Added:
01/01/2013
Postcolonial Women Writers
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Professor Elleke Boehmer notes the distinct lack of women writers on the Post/Colonial Writing page of the Great Writers website, and explores why this is the case. She draws attention to the phenomenon of double colonization and, taking Scottish/South African author Zoe Wicomb as an example, looks at the marketing and publishing industries to discuss why postcolonial women writers are less well-known than their male counterparts. This audio recording is part the Interviews on Great Writers series presented by Oxford University Podcasts.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Elleke Boehmer, Dominic Davies
Date Added:
10/08/2012
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 7: American Imperialism
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The American Imperialism Unit covers the Spanish-American War and the War in the Philippines. The lessons approach historical inquiry from different angles: one asks students to contrast newspaper accounts of the explosion of the Maine, while a more elaborate inquiry lesson delves into the causes of the Spanish-American War. In a third lesson students examine pro- and anti-imperialism political cartoons of the period. Finally, students are asked to interpret some of the brutal actions that took place in the Philippines.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
Date Added:
08/14/2012
The Roman Empire
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A millennium and a half after the end of the period of its unquestioned dominance, Rome remains a significant presence in western culture. This book explores what the empire meant to its subjects. The idea of Rome has long outlived the physical empire that gave it form, and now holds sway over vastly more people and a far greater geographical area than the Romans ever ruled. It continues to shape our understanding of the nature of imperialism, and thus, however subtly, to influence the workings of the world. Unlike most works on Roman history, this book does not offer a simplistic narrative, with military triumph followed by decline and fall. Instead, it analyses the origins and nature of Roman imperialism, its economic, social and cultural impact on the regions it conquered, and its continuing influence in discussions and debates about modern imperialism.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Pluto Press
Author:
Neville Morley
Date Added:
06/20/2010