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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.2 - Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their develo...
7th Grade Historical Literacy Units
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7th Grade Historical Literacy consists of two 43 minute class periods. Writing is one 43 minute block and reading is another. The teacher has picked themes based on social studies standards, and a read-aloud novel based on social studies serves as the mentor text for writing and reading skills. More social studies content is addressed in reading through teaching nonfiction reading skills and discussion.
Standards reflect CCSS ELA, Reading, and Social Studies Standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
04/15/2019
Careers: What Will Future Jobs Look Like?
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CC BY-NC
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Students will examine how technology is changing or eliminated careers that currently exist. Students will draw conclusions and develop hypotheses about these current careers and the changes that could possibly occur based on technology.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
05/09/2021
The Constitution and Government of Washington State
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An integrated language arts and social studies unit designed to develop student’s literacy skills while giving them an understanding of the general purpose of government, the structure and processes of Washington’s state government, and the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. The unit culminates with an optional mock legislature simulation that has students write and argue for a bill.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Date Added:
12/05/2017
Grade 7 ELA Module 1
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In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Find the rest of the EngageNY ELA resources at https://archive.org/details/engageny-ela-archive .

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
Identifying Media Bias in News Sources for Middle School
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Every media source has a story to tell--a driving purpose. The media that people consume largely shapes their world views. The US public is becoming more divided partially due to the consumption of increasingly biased news. As a critical consumer of media, It is important to be able to separate fact from opinion. In this unit, adapted from the high school version, students will become critical consumers of news, by identifying media bias in order to become better informed citizens.  NOTE: This unit has been adapted for use at the middle school level from the resource Identifying Media Bias in News Sources by Sandra Stroup, Sally Drendel, Greg Saum, and Heidi Morris.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Journalism
Political Science
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Game
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Amanda Schneider
Megan Shinn
Heidi Morris
Sally Drendel
Sandra Stroup
Date Added:
05/13/2021
Injustice at Home | The Japanese-American Experience of the World War II Era
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As part of Washington's Kip Tokuda Memorial Civil Liberties Public Education Program, which strives to educate the public regarding the history and the lessons of the World War II exclusion, removal, and detention of persons of Japanese ancestry, KSPS Public Television and Eastern Washington educators Starla Fey, Leslie Heffernan, and Morgen Larsen have produced Injustice at Home: the Japanese American experience of the World War II Era.

This educational resource--five educational videos and an inquiry-based unit of study--will help students understand Executive Order 9066 and the resulting internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, the failure of political leadership to protect constitutional rights, the military experience of Japanese-Americans during WWII, and examples of discrimination and racial prejudice the Japanese-American community faced before, during and after WWII.

In addition, students will analyze the short and long term emotional effects on those who are incarcerated, identify the challenges that people living outside of the exclusion zone faced, examine how some Japanese Americans showed their loyalty during the period of incarceration, and learn about brave individuals who stood up for Japanese Americans during this time.

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
KSPS Public Television
Leslie Heffernan
Morgen Larsen
Starla Fey
Date Added:
03/01/2019
PEI SOLS Middle School Wetlands: Ecosystem Services
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Coastal wetlands bring many benefits to ecosystems including their ability to sequester carbon and mitigate fluctuations in sea levels. Students will understand the ecosystem benefits of coastal wetlands with a focus on the potential of estuaries for climate related planning.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
Should we remove the Electron Dam?
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 This inquiry unit leads students through the different perspectives behind a decision to have a dam removed. This unit looks at similar Washington state dam removal decisions as well as the complex issue of having the Election dam removed near Puyallup, WA. Students will be introduced to the stories and traditional ways of knowing about salmon that the Puyallup Tribe has built their culture upon. Then they will explore the science behind hydroelectricity and build models to discover how carbon neutral energy is gathered through hydro dams. This inquiry unit ends with students researching different perspectives surrounding the current (2021) decision to remove the Electron dam including: the Tribe’s Fishery department, the ecosystem, the city council, the fishermen and the hydro-electrical company who currently owns the dam. With their research, students will do a socratic seminar to mimic the court case lawsuit that is ongoing against the Electron Dam. 

Subject:
Hydrology
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Elsie Mitchell
Date Added:
06/11/2021
Sun,Moon & Earth
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CC BY-SA
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The solar system is made up of the Sun, the planets that orbit the Sun, their satellites, dwarf planets and many, many small objects, like asteroids and comets. All of these objects move and we can see these movements. We notice the Sun rises in the eastern sky in the morning and sets in the western sky in the evening. We observe different stars in the sky at different times of the year. When ancient people made these observations, they imagined that the sky was actually moving while the Earth stood still.The Moon is a natural satellite of the Earth, meaning that it orbits around the Earth.It is the only place outside of the Earth that humans have ever been! We can often see the Moon on a clear night, but it does appear to change shape during the 29 days it takes to orbit the Earth.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
aditi ghela
Date Added:
08/28/2019
Territory and Treaty Making: A study of Tribes, Westward Expansion, and Conflict
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CC BY
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This unit is focused on the examination of a single topic, in this case, the Native Americans of the inland Northwest and conflict that arose when other non-native people started to settle in the northwest, and to specifically address the native populations that lived in the inland northwest. The materials were created to be one coherent arc of instruction focused on one topic. The module was designed to include teaching notes that signal the kind of planning and thinking such instruction requires: close reading with complex text, and specific instructional strategies or protocols are described that support students’ reading and writing with evidence are described in enough detail to make it very clear what is required of students and how to support students in doing this rigorous work. Materials include summative assessment of content and process, central texts, key resources, and protocols that support and facilitate student learning.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Whittle, Whittle it Down: Summarizing
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This "jigsaw" activity will give students the opportunity to work in groups to summarize a 1 to 2 page informational text. It "jigsaws" down to 1 class summary and can be done in 2 or 3 days. This plan was designed for a class of 22 students but can be easily modified by varying group size.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/10/2013
Wildfires of Central Washington Inquiry Lesson Plan
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CC BY
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Students will be exploring the idea of ecosystems and wildfires. They will become familiar with what an ecosystem is and how to keep them healthy. Students will also see the positive and negative effects of wildfires on ecosystems. Also how wildfires influence the local government and federal government when it comes to land management.

Subject:
Life Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Amanda Jenkins
Date Added:
06/11/2021