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Learning to Read Closely

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ATP as Cellular Energy
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In this seminar you will read closely and analyze the structure of ATP- Adenosine Triphosphate. You will curate your own  information about the importance of ATP in a cell by listening and reading text as to what the experts have to say.  By modeling the function of ATP in an inquiry lab you can accurately identify the  various levels of cellular work done by Adenosine Triphosphate.StandardsBIO.A.3.1.1 Describe the fundamental roles of plastids (e.g., chloroplasts) and mitochondria in energy transformations.BIO.A.3.2.1 Compare and contrast the basic transformation of energy during photosynthesis and cellular respiration.BIO.A.3.2.2 Describe the role of ATP in biochemical reactions

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Deanna Mayers
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
10/05/2017
Accessible Content for All: Building Equity & Engagement with Tech Tools
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Think about the diverse learners in your classroom. How do we engage ALL learners in the curriculum content?  In the Accessible Content for All modules, you will learn about Accessible Educational Material (AEM) and tech tools that are hidden in plain sight in your schools.  You will hear teacher accounts of using tools like read-aloud, closed captioning, and translation to increase student engagement.  These modules are self-paced and cover ways to create accessibility within Google, Microsoft, and IOS.  Peruse the modules and explore the topics you want to learn more about.  Create your own learning journey toward building accessibility, equity, and engagement in your classroom.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
SETC CWU
Rose Racicot
Linda Doehle
Dan Herlihy
Kristin Leslie
Date Added:
03/03/2023
Algebra I/II Lessons — Skew The Script
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A collection of relevant lessons to supplement your units in Algebra I/II. Mix these lessons into your course to show students the algebraic reasoning behind social issues, public health, the environment, business, sports, and more.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Skew The Script
Date Added:
01/31/2023
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
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CC BY
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In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
Analyzing Tragic Heroes in Chapters 3&4 of Things Fall Apart
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Can a person be both admirable and flawed at the same time? In this lesson, students will look more closely at the character of Okonkwo. Students will figure out what his most admirable qualities are, as well as some of his flaws. They will also decide whether Okonkwo has the potential to be a tragic hero.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Katlyn Powers
Date Added:
07/23/2020
Anime and the Art of Storytelling
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This unit is a joint exploration of the genre of Japanese animation (“anime”) and Homer’s epic poem, The Odyssey . The unit begins by questioning how stories work in general and what makes a narrative “epic” in particular. After establishing the foundations of narrative analysis and a set of concrete expectations for reading epic stories, the unit dives into the story of Odysseus, pairing it with similar anime narratives. Odysseus is a man who faces extraordinary obstacles, and this theme occurs in many anime series and movies, including Attack on Titan , Evangelion , Spirited Away , and many others. Students will study the content, looking at how the same kind of story is told in different ways with different implications, and they will also look at form: how Homer’s poetry and anime work in their own ways to achieve distinct aesthetic goals. Just as Homer’s poet shines with brilliance, there is also an enormous amount of creativity to bring to the drawn and moving image. By the end of this unit, students will have performed many exercises in close reading and analysis, culminating in their own experiment in the anime form and epic genre.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2017 Curriculum Units Volume I
Date Added:
08/01/2017
Annotating text
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Support slides for a guided lesson about annotating text. Audience 8th-10th grade students.  

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Beth Jordan
Date Added:
04/19/2019
Applying Angle Theorems
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This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to use geometric properties to solve problems. In particular, it will support you in identifying and helping students who have the following difficulties: Solving problems relating to using the measures of the interior angles of polygons; and solving problems relating to using the measures of the exterior angles of polygons.

Subject:
Geometry
Mathematics
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Arts Lessons in the Classroom: Visual Art Curriculum - Grade 1
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These active process-oriented lessons focus on concepts of line direction and type, organic shape, 3-D form, real and implied texture, secondary color, and principles of composition. Literacy-infused lessons explore text direction/spacing, observation, description, and story elements through drawing, painting, collage, clay modeling and printmaking.

The K-6 lesson handbooks were originally produced for the Lake Washington School District with grants from 4culture and ArtsWA. Encourage your colleagues, other schools, and organizations to use these materials for non-commercial, educational purposes at no cost by downloading their own copy at: http://artsedwashington.org/portfolio-items/alic-2

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Washington ArtsEd
Date Added:
09/09/2020
Baseball, Race Relations and Jackie Robinson
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Public Domain
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Students use Library of Congress primary sources to examine race relations in the mid-20th century United States through a close reading of two documents relating to Jackie Robinson's breaking of the racial...

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Lesson Plans
Date Added:
08/15/2022
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo, Exemplar Text
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This exemplar text is designed to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they’ve been practicing on a regular basis to absorb deep lessons from Kate DiCamillo’s story. By reading and rereading the passage closely and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will identify how and why the three main characters became friends.

* This text is extracted from a close reading exemplar produced and published by Student Achievement Partners

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Reading
Date Added:
11/11/2012
Begin Your Research
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Begin Research“Where Do I Start?”Do you have an assignment to write a research paper but you’re not sure where to start? Take a deep breath and begin by carefully reading the assignment requirements. This will help you understand the work you need to do.First, let’s think about what we mean when we say “research.”HOW MUCH DO YOU ALREADY KNOW?What makes a good topic?It is broad enough that you can find enough information on the subject.It is focused enough that you are not overwhelmed with too much information.The topic is interesting to you.All of the above.If you don’t know much about your topic, what resources would be most helpful when you being your research?Encyclopedias and websitesScholarly articlesNewspapers and magazinesStatistical informationIt is always a good idea to brainstorm different words for similar ideas when you first begin to research your topic.TrueFalseWhat statement below is generally true about beginning research?It is pretty easy to find information on any topic.As long as you have a good topic, researching for it will not take a long time.No matter t he assignment, good research takes time and effort.None of the above.ANSWERSAll of the above.2.1True4.3Read Your Assignment CarefullyBefore you can even begin your research, though, you need to read the assignment instructions carefully—more than once! This will help you understand the work you need to do.Highlight topic guidelines, required length, and the types of information sources allowed.Let’s take a look at a sample assignment.UNDERSTAND YOUR ASSIGNMENTLily is taking a University Studies class and must complete this assignment:In this paper, you will analyze the scientific aspects of a known environmental problem and identify and discuss at least two proposed solutions.Now, analyze this assignment step by step.Find the words that tell you what to do (think verbs!): analyze, identify, and discuss.Find the limits of the assignment: scientific aspects and two proposed solutions.Find the key theme: a known environmental problemBy reading the assignment carefully, we know that Lily has to analyze an environmental problem and identify and discuss at least two proposed solutions.Pick a Good TopicLily’s assignment is broad enough to give her some choices when picking a topic. So, what makes a good topic?It interests you! You’ll enjoy it and do a better job.It meets the requirements of your assignment.It’s broad enough to give you several search options.It’s focused enough that you’re not overwhelmed with information.HOT TIP!Explore the library’s databases to get you started.Browse newspapers and news sources.Talk to your instructors and fellow students.Consult with a librarian.TOO BROAD, TOO NARROW, OR JUST RIGHT?Air pollution in urban areasToo broadToo narrowJust rightRespiratory diseases in children in high-density urban areasToo broadToo narrowJust rightEnvironmental consequences of California’s October 2007 forest firesToo broadToo narrowJust rightPolar bear adaptation to global warming in the ArcticToo broadToo narrowJust rightRenewable energy in the United StatesToo broadToo narrowJust rightThe design and implementation of Cal-Cars—the California Cars InitiativeToo broadToo narrowJust rightANSWERSToo broad. You’d need to identify an aspect of air pollution to narrow down the scopeJust right! This is a good topic. You’ll continue to refine your ideas as you learn more about the topic.A bit narrow. It will be hard to find information on just one event. Look more broadly for information on forest fires in California or the West.Just right. There should be just enough information to get you started. You will continue to refine your ideas as you learn more about the topic.Too broad. This is a good starting place, but you’d want to focus the topic by selecting a specific renewable energy like solar power or wind.Too narrow. It’s going to be difficult to find information on such a narrow topic. Broaden the focus to look at initiatives like this one that are less regional.Identify Potential IdeasNow it’s time to really focus your topic. Browse a few resources for ideas and identify different aspects of the topic.Remember, if you pick a subject that interests you, you’ll enjoy the research process much more!Customize Your TopicLet’s say your assignment is to research an environmental issue. This is a broad starting point, which is a normal first step.One way to customize your topic is to consider how different disciplines approach the same topic in different ways. For example, here’s how your broad topic of “environmental issues” might be approached from different perspectives.Social Sciences: Economics of Using Wind to Produce Energy in the United StatesSciences: Impact of Climate Change on the Habitat of Desert Animals in ArizonaArts and Humanities: Analysis of the Rhetoric of Environmental Protest LiteratureTurn Your Topic into a QuestionWhen you’ve chosen a topic, it’s time to ask some questions. Using “environmental issues” as our general research interest, let’s ask some questions about environmental issues and agriculture.How: How do government agricultural subsidies impact the price of food?  How does the use of pesticides affect food safety?Who: Consumers, farmers, farm workersWhat: Food safety, pesticides, food prices, genetically modified food, organic farmingWhere: United States, developing nations, European UnionWhy: Why does the European Union ban the sale and distribution of genetically modified food?What’s Your Angle?Let’s say that the most interesting question that emerged from the last exercise was: “How does repeated pesticide use in agriculture impact soil and groundwater pollution?”Find Your KeywordsNow that we have our sample research question, we need to identify the key concepts and their related keywords.Using our research question, “How does repeated pesticide use in agriculture impact soil and groundwater pollution?” we might consider these keywords:A SYMPHONY OF SYNONYMSLet’s examine our research question again:How does repeated pesticide use in agriculture impact soil and groundwater pollution?Now analyze this assignment step by step:Find important words and phrases that describe this topic (you can ignore common words that don’t have a lot of meaning, such as prepositions, articles, and adjectives): pesticide, agriculture, soil, and pollution.Now, think of some synonyms for the keywords you found:pesticideagrochemicals, pest management, weed management,diazinan, malathionagriculturefarming, food crops, specific types of cropssoilclay, organic componentsgroundwater watershed, water resources, water table, aquaticspollutionenvironmental impact, degradation, exposure, acid rainWhy are synonyms necessary? You’ll often need to search for different words relating to the same concept.Dive Into a Sea of Resources!Browse through general sources to get familiar with your topic. You will find many sources for locating background information. Remember our point from earlier in this tutorial: the source you select will determine what you find. Make sure you spend your time looking in the right places.HOT TIP!Is there enough info on your topic? If not, review the earlier steps for starting your research. It’s normal to refine and revise your topic multiple times.What Do You Know?Once you’ve established your focused topic, you need to get familiar with it by doing some reading. Start with more general sources and then work up to more specific and detailed sources. Where you go next depends on how much you know.So, just how much do you know about your topic?Not All That MuchI’ve Got the BasicsI’m Ready for DetailsSounds like you need the type of information typically found in encyclopedias and websites.Sounds like you’ve got a basic understanding of your topic and just need to learn more. Check out books, magazines, and newspapers.Specific information is what you need. You’ll want to find relevant scholarly articles, statistical sources, and government publications.Matching Resources to Your Information NeedNewspaper: Current regional or local informationScholarly journal article: Detailed analysis of a complex problem.Book or book chapter: Summary of what is known about a topic.Encyclopedia or website: Factual information like names, dates, and definitions.TEST YOURSELF: WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?What are the characteristics of a good topic?(Select all that apply) It interests you.It meets the requirements of your assignment.It’s broad enough to give you several search options.It’s focused enough that you’re not overwhelmed with information.Rank the following questions in order from most general to most specific (1 being the most general):Are pesticides bad?Do video games cause violent behavior in adolescent males?Are agricultural workers in Mexico at a higher risk of health problems due to pesticide exposure because of lax government safety standards?Is there a relationship between fast food consumption and obesity?What is the best way to focus  your topic?Think about the discipline that you are researching for.Tailor your topic to the requirements of your assignment.Talk to a librarian about the resources that are available for your topic.All of the above.Pick the best set of keywords to begin searching for information on global warming.Rising ocean levels, air pollution, greenhouse gasesBiodiversity, atmospheric temperature, ozone layerGlobal climate change, greenhouse effect, atmospheric carbon dioxideEnvironment sustainability, alternative energy, biofuelsWhy is it a good idea to use different words to describe similar ideas when you are beginning research?(Select all that apply) Because there is only one right answer and you can find it by trial and error.Because  using different words will help you cast a broader net than just using the same term over and over.Different researchers might use different terms to describe the same idea.You might spell some of the words wrong and not get any results.What is the most difficult aspect of beginning to research a topic that you don’t know very much about?You don’t know enough about the topic to know what is important and what is not.You don’t understand the technical aspects of the topic.It takes a lot of time to do research.All of the above.For you, what the most difficult part about beginning your research?ANSWERSA good topic will incorporate all these characteristics.1 = Are pesticides bad?2 = Is there a relationship between fast food consumption and obesity?3 = Do video games cause violent behavior in adolescent males?4 = Are agricultural workers in Mexico at a higher risk of health problems due to pesticide exposure because of lax government safety standards?The more a research question incorporates the concepts of Who, What, When, Where, Why, and  How the more specific it will be.All of the above.4.3; think carefully about which terms are closely related to global warming.5.2 and 5.3; there may be many ways to describe a single topic. Using as many related words as possible will help you find the most information!All of the above; remember that research takes time and energy and isn’t an easy thing to do!No matter what, coming to the library and talking to a librarian will help you get started. Finding information effectively and efficientlyLevel 2 teaches you how to structure a search for the information you need to write a paper, for example. You will learn the following:how to construct a search strategy using the aspects defined in level 1how to perform a smart search using the information sources available at TU Delft LibraryDetermining search termsNow it is time to do an actual search! In level 1 you divided the search topic into its different aspects. What’s next? Are you going to use Google and type in all the aspects, like you probably do every day? What will you do with all the search results? Are you going to study them all? No, there is a smarter way!Exercise 1Plug in your earphones or turn down the volume and watch the clip ‘Web Search Strategies Explained in Plain English‘ by Commoncraft about smart searching on the web.Searching the web is very similar to searching other information sources such as Worldcat Discovery. Doing the following exercise will teach you how to apply the aspects of your search topic in a smart search. Complete the exercise on how to find suitable search terms matching the aspects of the search topic. Determining search strategyNow you are going to convert the synonyms you have found into a smart search strategy. You have to use search operators to use all the synonyms properly.Exercise 2Study the TUlib module Search operators.If you want to perform a smart search, you must combine your search terms. Complete thisexercise on combining search terms with Boolean operators.Towards information sourcesNow you have formulated a search strategy, which you will use to search the various information sources. But where to start? How do you choose which information source you want to use? This table gives an overview of the differences between Worldcat Discovery, Scopus and Google Scholar and helps you determine when to use each one.Exercise 3Watch the first two sections (“Basic searching” and “Retrieving documents”) of this video about searching in WorldCat Discovery (which includes the TU Delft Library catalogue).Watch this video with an example of a search strategy carried out in article database Scopus.Complete the exercise on carrying out your search strategy in various information sources.Now you have learned how to convert the aspects of your search topic into a search strategy and how to apply this strategy in a number of information sources.You can find other relevant information sources for your subject area in the “Useful links” overview in the section “What’s next”.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Mark McBride
Date Added:
11/17/2016
The Big Mo
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Momentum is not only a physical principle; it is a psychological phenomenon. Students learn how the "Big Mo" of the bandwagon effect contributes to the development of fads and manias, and how modern technology and mass media accelerate and intensify the effect. Students develop media literacy and critical thinking skills to analyze trends and determine the extent to which their decisions may be influenced by those who manipulate a few opinion leaders. Note: The literacy activities for the Mechanics unit are based on physical themes that have broad application to our experience in the world concepts of rhythm, balance, spin, gravity, levity, inertia, momentum, friction, stress and tension.

Subject:
Applied Science
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise Carlson
Jane Evenson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Date Added:
09/26/2008
Bill of Rights PSA
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Students will create a PSA describing their basic rights afforded to them by the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
05/19/2017
Biology
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CC BY
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Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Biology
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
A Bird’s Eye View
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SYNOPSIS: In this lesson, students learn the impacts of climate change on birds, explore the effectiveness of public art on climate change awareness, and synthesize informational texts into a persuasive or argumentative essay.

SCIENTIST NOTES: Bird species are suffering and facing extinction as a result of rising temperatures. Several species are slowly losing their range and changing shape and size. This lesson also establishes the possibility that a gradual rise in temperature could affect human survival, but it also gives students the opportunity to brainstorm and use their artistic talents to convey conservation strategies that would safeguard local wildlife and ecologically delicate species. This lesson is suggested for use in the classroom since the video, pictures, and materials are from reliable sources.

POSITIVES:
-This lesson can be used to teach students close reading or note-taking strategies.
-This lesson can be used to focus on elements of persuasive or argumentative writing techniques.
-This lesson can be easily adapted for writing workshops and the peer editing process in a multi-day or mini-unit.
-This lesson can be done in the Spring or Fall when students can also observe local birds outside, or during state testing days as an independent or partner project.
-This lesson can be used as a stand-alone lesson or as a lesson in a unit on non-fiction, birds, geography, art, or research.
-Students are given voice and choice and can work independently or in pairs.
-Students explore various media and guide their own learning with options for breadth and depth.
-Students learn about local bird species in their neighborhood and region.
-Students have two different options to create their own artistic responses.

ADDITIONAL PREREQUISITES:
-Teachers should be aware that the Audubon organization is named after John James Audubon and references his “complicated history” as an unrepentant slave owner and strong advocate for slavery. Students will explore this in the lesson, but teachers may want to preview the articles prior to the lesson.
-Students should have some basic understanding of citing sources and referencing multiple resources in writing.
-Students should have a basic understanding of the elements of persuasive or argumentative writing.
-Students should have access to devices with a strong internet connection.

DIFFERENTIATION:
-Teachers can extend the research and writing portions of the lesson, using them to teach specific elements in persuasive or argumentative writing.
-Teachers can provide paragraph or essay structures, graphic organizers, brainstorming, or outline templates for students to use.
-Teachers can read one article in the Inspire section with the class as an anchor text or to model reading and note-taking strategies.
-English teachers can choose to make the artistic element a separate class period, an extension, or extra credit activity.
-Teachers can assign other articles from the Audubon website for extension activities.
-Social studies, civics, and economics classes can extend this topic to discuss social justice, socioeconomic status, and cultural impacts. Students can research and discuss how other activists’ “complicated” backgrounds have impacted their messaging.
-Music classes can listen to bird songs of birds from the Audubon website and compare the musicality and tonality of different bird songs in the same region.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
SubjectToClimate
Author:
Yen-Yen Chiu
Date Added:
06/30/2023
Bomba: Género de música
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Students will investigate musical genres in Spanish Speaking countries in order to better understand the history and influences that created the music, as well as the cultural connections/impact of the music today. Begin studying Bomba as a class and work through the investigation process together; then students can select a different genre of music to research and explore before creating a visual essay about their topic.The complete lesson plan included is the 4th class period of a 8-10 period unit of study; the complete unit slides are included in the resource folder with all readings, videos, etc. Lessons are in Spanish, but could be adapted for an English class with Spanish translanguaging as many of the videos are included with closed captions. 

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Language Education (ESL)
Languages
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Kellie Rosenberger
Oregon Open Learning
Date Added:
06/03/2022