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3rd Grade History Unit Design: Native Americans of North America
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This unit on American Indians: By studying the regions of the United States and the cultures that live in each region, students are able to compare/contrast within regions and across regions how tribes used their environments, and their cultural and other contributions to American life.

Note that the emphasis here is on broader groups of tribes for each region with some instruction on specific tribes representing each region. In no way is this case study approach to learning about one tribe meant to be generalized to all tribes of that region. We understand that each tribe was and continues to be unique in its culture, practices, lifeways, and traditions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Education
Elementary Education
History
Social Science
U.S. History
World Cultures
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
10/23/2019
American Colonial Life in the Late 1700s: Distant Cousins
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This lesson introduces students to American colonial life and has them compare the daily life and culture of two different colonies in the late 1700s. Students study artifacts of the thirteen original British colonies and write letters between fictitious cousins in Massachusetts and Delaware.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Common pesticides pose threat to seed-eating songbirds
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"A recent study shows that common pesticides could seriously harm and disorient a songbird native to North America. Migratory bird populations across the world are declining. While that trend has been linked to a litany of complex factors, one of the most concerning is the widespread use of common pesticides, namely, organophosphates and neonicotinoids. Neonicotinoids, the more modern of the pair, were originally thought to be less harmful to the human and wildlife nervous system. But mounting evidence suggests that may notbe the case. One group of animals susceptible to the brain-altering effects of the pesticides are migratory songbirds. In a recent study, researchers looked at the white-crowned sparrow in particular. The white-crowned sparrow migrates as far as northern Canada during breeding season and as far south as Central Mexico in the winter. Like many other migratory birds, the sparrow relies on the rich farmland in between to rest and refuel. And that’s where danger may lie..."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Life Science
Zoology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Comparing Governments - International
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This lesson focuses on comparing and contrasting national governments in North America and/or Central America. It is the second in a sequence, the first being "Comparing Governments - Local, State, and National" by Tami Weaver and Wendy Pineda.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Tami Weaver
Wendy Pineda
Date Added:
07/15/2004
The Enslaved Family, African American Community during Slavery, African American Identity: Vol. I, 1500-1865, Primary Resources in U.S. History and Literature, Toolbox Library, National Humanities Cen
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"I never knew a whole family to live together, till all were grown up, in my life," recalls Lewis Clarke of his twenty-five years enslaved in Kentucky.1 Families were separated due to sale, escape, early death from poor health, suicide, and murder by a slaveholder, overseer, slave patroller, or other dominant person. Separation also occurred within the plantation itself, e.g., by segregating "field slaves" from "house servants," removing children from parents to live together with a slave caretaker, or bringing children fathered by the slaveholder to live in the "Big House." How, then, did the slave family provide solace and identity? "What the family does, and what the family did for African Americans," writes historian Deborah White Gray, "was create a world outside of the world of work. It allowed for significant others. It allowed a male slave to be more than just a brute beast. It allowed him to be a father, to be a son. It allowed women to be mothers and to take on roles that were outside of that of a slave, of a servant."2 When did the enslaved child realize how his or her family life differed from the slave-holder's? How did enslaved adults cope with the forced disintegration of their families? Here we read a collection of texts—two letters, a memoir, and interview excerpts—to consider these questions. (See also Theme II: ENSLAVEMENT, #2, Sale.)

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
05/03/2019
Global Nomads Group: Global Citizens in Action: Civic Engagement Curriculum (Semester-Long Program)
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Global Citizens in Action is a civic engagement curriculum that focuses on cultural exchange, media literacy, and global citizenship. Through exploring the driving question, “How do we, as youth, engage our communities to create positive social change?”

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Full Course
Interactive
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Date Added:
10/11/2013
Global Nomads Group: Science and Technology Curriculum (Year-Long Program)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Road to Doha explores critical environmental issues through addressing the driving question “How do we, as youth, impact climate change in our communities?”

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Student Guide
Date Added:
10/18/2013
Lesson 1. Hopi Place Names
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CC BY
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A guided exploration of "Hopitutskwa," the Hopi homeland, through maps and place names. Using English translations, students make inferences about the Hopi cultural relationship to landscape and place. They examine regional place names of their own home communities and create personal maps by identifying and naming places of importance in their lives.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
MAPS ETC: United States Demographics
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Educational Use
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This collection of maps from MAPS ETC show demographic information for the United states ranging from 1700 to the early 20th century.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
University of South Florida
Provider Set:
Educational Technology Clearinghouse
Date Added:
03/23/2014
Percentage of the Labour Force 15 Years and Over, Who Lived in a Different Province or Territory 5 Years Ago by 2006 Census Divisions (CDs)
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Map shows census divisions (a variably sized region ranging from 1100 and 2.5 million people) color coded by the percentage of people living in the area that lived in a different province or territory five years ago. CDs in sparsely populated regions are excluded. The map suggests that there is a great deal of migration into Alberta -- likely to work in the oil industry.

Subject:
Economics
Geoscience
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
TeachingWithData.org
Provider Set:
TeachingWithData.org
Author:
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
Statistics Canada
Date Added:
11/07/2014
Respondants' perception of the Nation's progress in coping with illegal drugs
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Statistical table showing respondents's perceptions towards the nation's progress in coping with illegal drugs.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Data Set
Provider:
TeachingWithData.org
Provider Set:
TeachingWithData.org
Author:
Bureau of Justice Statistics
The Gallup Organization
Date Added:
11/07/2014
What's In A Name?
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CC BY
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In this curriculum unit, students will learn about the origins of four major types of British surnames. They will consult lists to discover the meanings of specific names and later demonstrate their knowledge of surnames through various group activities. They will then compare the origins of British to certain types of non-British surnames. In a final activity, the students will research the origins and meanings of their own family names.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Women and Revolution: In the Time of the Butterflies
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CC BY
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Set in the Dominican Republic during the rule of Rafael Trujillo, In the Time of the Butterflies fictionalizes historical figures in order to dramatize the Dominican people's heroic efforts to overthrow this dictator's brutal regime. In the following activities, students will examine the actions of the characters in the novel and discuss an all encompassing definition for courage.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
World History: Cultures, States, and Societies (Global Remix)
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CC BY-SA
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This is a remixed version of World History: Culture, States, and Societies to 1500 by Berger, et al. It's a textbook suitable for the World History survey. I have reorganized the text in order to provide a more globally integrated narrative. Each chapter invites students to compare and contrast developments across regions during a period of time.

This version of the book retains the text of the original but with updated references to chapters. I verified and, if necessary, updated links to online resources. In cases where the exact illustration used in the original version was not available, I have substituted equivalent ones. I also created and edited segues and other “connective tissue” as well to (hopefully) ensure that this version of the book reads as smoothly as the original.

Additional changes include:

More concise lists of “key terms” in each chapter
Expanded coverage of the Persian Empire
Expanded coverage of the end of the Yuan Dynasty
Added brief overview of the early Ming Dynasty including the voyages of Zheng He
Work on this adaption was generously sponsored by a grant from Michigan Colleges Online, a project of the Michigan Community College Association.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Date Added:
02/22/2018