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Foundations of Western Culture II
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Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI.
Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Voltaire, Blake, Williams); the American Civil War and the abolition of slavery (Stowe, Whitman, Lincoln). Readings from the twentieth-century include poetry by Lowell and Walcott and fiction by Ondaatje and O.S. Card.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
History
Literature
Philosophy
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fuller, Mary
Date Added:
09/01/2002
From the Silk Road to the Great Game: China, Russia, and Central Eurasia
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This subject examines interactions across the Eurasian continent between Russians, Chinese, Mongolian nomads, and Turkic oasis dwellers during the last millennium and a half. As empires rose and fell, religions, trade, and war flowed back and forth continuously across this vast space. Today, the fall of the Soviet Union and China's reforms have opened up new opportunities for cultural interaction.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
History
Social Science
World Cultures
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Perdue, Peter
Date Added:
09/01/2003
Gender
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This course examines the definition of gender in scientific, societal, and historical contexts. It explores how gender influences state formation and the work of the state, what role gender plays in imperialism and in the welfare state, the ever-present relationship between gender and war, and different states' regulation of the body in gendered ways at different times. It investigates new directions in the study of gender as historians, anthropologists and others have taken on this fascinating set of problems.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
Gender and Sexuality Studies
History
Social Science
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ekmekcioglu, Lerna
Wood, Elizabeth
Date Added:
02/01/2017
Historical Diplomacy Simulation: Barbary Pirates Hostage Crisis - Negotiating Tribute & Trade
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Public Domain
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For almost 300 years, leaders of the North African Barbary States hired ship captains to capture foreign ships in the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean.

These captains, known as corsairs, kept the ships and cargo, then ransomed the crew or forced them to work in captivity.

This practice was a way for these semi-independent states of the Ottoman Empire to generate money. Some wealthy countries, such as Great Britain, would sign treaties with or make payments to the Barbary States, permitting their merchants to travel the seas freely. These cash payments and preferential trade agreements were called tributes.

When the United States gained its independence in 1783, it lost the protection of the British navy, and Barbary corsairs captured two American ships in 1785. As a new nation with limited revenue to support its government, the United States had limited funds to pay tribute and many Americans opposed it on principle. In 1793, Algerine corsairs captured 11 more American ships and 100 citizens, prompting a commercial and humanitarian crisis that could not be ignored.

With no navy or substantial annual revenue, how could the United States pay hefty ransom fees and prevent this from happening again?

Would the Barbary States even agree to negotiate terms when they clearly had the upper hand?

Subject:
History
Political Science
Social Science
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Case Study
Lesson Plan
Simulation
Provider:
National Museum of American Diplomacy
Author:
National Museum of American Diplomacy
Date Added:
09/27/2021
History of Media and Technology
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History of Media and Technology addresses the mutually influential histories of communications media and technological development, focusing on the shift from analog to digital cultures that began mid-century and continues to the present. The approach the series takes to the study of media and technology is a multifaceted one that includes theoretical and philosophical works, histories canonical and minority, literature and art, as well as hands-on production issues toward the advancement of student projects and research papers. The topic for this term is Eternal War.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Graphic Arts
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Coleman, Beth
Date Added:
02/01/2005
Innovation in Military Organizations
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This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
History
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Posen, Barry
Sapolsky, Harvey
Date Added:
09/01/2005
International Relations Theory in the Cyber Age
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This course examines cyber dynamics and processes in international relations from different theoretical perspectives. It considers alternative theoretical and empirical frameworks consistent with characteristic features of cyberspace and emergent transformations at all levels of international interaction. Theories examined include realism and neorealism, institutionalism and liberalism, constructivism, and systems theory and lateral pressure. The course also highlights relevant features and proposes customized international relations theory for the cyber age.
Students taking the graduate version are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through reading and individual research.

Subject:
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Choucri, Nazli
Date Added:
09/01/2015
Introduction to Global Studies
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This textbook introduces students to the basic concepts, trends, perspectives and interconnections of global society. Through readings, discussions, videos, webcasts and other activities, students examine the interdependence of people around the world and global issues that affect these relationships. It will provide an overview of the history and theoretical approaches that have created a global society through topics such as global politics, human rights, the natural environment, population, disease, gender, information technology, war and peace. This is a required course for the Global Studies Emphasis.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Minnesota State Opendora
Author:
Lori-Beth Larsen
Date Added:
09/16/2019
Introduction to Global Studies
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course introduces students to the basic concepts, trends, perspectives and interconnections of global society. Through readings, discussions, videos, webcasts and other activities, students examine the interdependence of people around the world and global issues that affect these relationships. It will provide an overview of the history and theoretical approaches that have created a global society through topics such as global politics, human rights, the natural environment, population, disease, gender, information technology, war and peace. This is a required course for the Global Studies Emphasis.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Minnesota State Opendora
Author:
Lori-Beth Larsen
Date Added:
09/16/2019
Introduction to the History of Technology
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This course is an introduction to the consideration of technology as the outcome of particular technical, historical, cultural, and political efforts, especially in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include industrialization of production and consumption, development of engineering professions, the emergence of management and its role in shaping technological forms, the technological construction of gender roles, and the relationship between humans and machines.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mindell, David
Date Added:
09/01/2006
Julius Caesar and the Fall of the Roman Republic
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This course explores the political, social, and economic factors commonly offered to explain the fall of the Roman Republic: growth of the territorial empire, increased intensity of aristocratic competition, transformation of the Italian economy, growth of the city of Rome and dependence of the urban plebs, changes in military recruitment and dependence of soldiers on their generals. There is an emphasis on the reading of ancient sources in translation, including Cicero, Sallust, Caesar, Augustus, Appian, Plutarch, and Suetonius.

Subject:
Ancient History
Arts and Humanities
History
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
02/01/2016
Lenses of Vietnam: Protest in a Democracy [Inquiry Design Model (IDM) Unit Plan]
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This inquiry takes students through an analysis and evaluation of the Compelling Question “Is protest important in a democracy?” using the Vietnam War as a lens to approach the topic. To accomplish this, students will become more media literate through evaluating sources, biases, perspectives, and the goals of creating media. Throughout the inquiry, students will engage in activities designed to promote and develop media literacy while analzying the Compelling Question and learning about the historical protests of the Vietnam Era.This inquiry is expected to take two weeks (10 periods) to complete: one 45-minute class period to stage the question, introduce the inquiry, and to review media literacy; two 45-minute class periods for each of the three supporting questions; and then three 45-minute class periods for students to write and research their argumentative thesis. If students are as of yet less familiar with media literacy, the instructor should add at least another class period, or more, introducing them more fully to this.The full unit, along with all materials and resources, is available as a PDF attachment.

Subject:
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
History
Political Science
Social Science
Sociology
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Adam MacDonald
Date Added:
06/23/2020
Lunch Poems: Dunya Mikhail
Read the Fine Print
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Iraqi poet Dunya Mikhail immigrated to the United States in 1996 after increasing harassment over her poetry, which confronts war and exile with subversive depictions of suffering. In 2001 she was awarded the UN Human Rights Award for Freedom of Writing. (28 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
04/24/2012
McNeil Island and WWII Japanese American Draft Resistance
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As a young man, Takashi Hoshizaki was imprisoned on McNeil Island, Washington in 1944 for resisting the draft for World War II.  His resistance was part of a broader legal battle for the civil rights of over 120,000 Japanese Americans, including Takashi's family, imprisoned in American concentration camps.  This lesson includes a 7-minute introduction video, lesson plan notes, activities, vocabulary, and educator resources.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Author:
Japanese American Memorial Pilgrimages
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
08/02/2023
Military Memoirs Writing Workshop
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A Part of the Military Memoirs Writing Project

Short Description:
The Military

Word Count: 2537

ISBN: 979-8-218-01360-8

(Note: This resource's metadata has been created automatically by reformatting and/or combining the information that the author initially provided as part of a bulk import process.)

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Military Memoirs Writing Project
Date Added:
06/01/2022
Narrative exposure therapy: A treatment option for survivors of war living with PTSD
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CC BY
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This resource is a video abstract of a research paper created by Research Square on behalf of its authors. It provides a synopsis that's easy to understand, and can be used to introduce the topics it covers to students, researchers, and the general public. The video's transcript is also provided in full, with a portion provided below for preview:

"More than 350 million adult survivors of war throughout the world suffer from post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) and/or major depression Most live in low- and middle-income countries While treating the systemic impact of PTSD in these areas is extremely difficult, effective treatments are available Exposure therapies, such as Narrative Exposure Therapy, can be brief, culturally sensitive and help communities affected by complex traumatic stress Exposure therapy involves imaginatively reliving the life-altering moments leading to a PTSD diagnosis Evidence suggests that exposure therapy works by reconnecting areas of the brain that stopped communicating due to experiencing one or more traumatic events Although the focus of exposure therapy is on reducing individual PTSD symptoms, the impact of therapy can extend beyond the individual level leading to better relationship functioning and social engagement Multi-level treatments like exposure therapy and relational interventions could be a powerful.."

The rest of the transcript, along with a link to the research itself, is available on the resource itself.

Subject:
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Research Square
Provider Set:
Video Bytes
Date Added:
12/04/2019
Nuclear Weapons in International Politics: Past, Present and Future
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This course will expose students to tools and methods of analysis for use in assessing the challenges and dangers associated with nuclear weapons in international politics. The first two weeks of the course will look at the technology and design of nuclear weapons and their means of production. The next five weeks will look at the role they played in the Cold War, the organizations that managed them, the technologies that were developed to deliver them, and the methods used to analyze nuclear force structures and model nuclear exchanges. The last six weeks of the course will look at theories and cases of nuclear decision making beyond the original five weapon states, and will look particularly at why states pursue or forego nuclear weapons, the role that individuals and institutions play, and the potential for both new sources of proliferation and new consequences.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Cote, Owen
Walsh, James
Date Added:
02/01/2009
Paul Revere Goes For A Ride
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This is an introductory lesson to the contributions of Paul Revere to the Patriot cause. It includes several resources for further understanding

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Date Added:
03/15/2018
Political Economy and Economic Development
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This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence.
MITx Online Version
This course is part of the Micromaster’s Program in Data, Economics, and Design of Policy through MITx Online. The course is entirely free to audit, though learners have the option to pay a fee, which is based on the learner's ability to pay, to take the proctored exam, and earn a course certificate. To access the course, create an MITx Online account and enroll in the course 14.750x Political Economy and Economic Development.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Olken, Benjamin
Date Added:
09/01/2012
Politics and Religion
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This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subject:
Anthropology
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Religious Studies
Social Science
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Tsai, Lily
Date Added:
09/01/2006